Questions tagged [vocabulary]

This tag is for questions concerning the meaning and usage of individual words or a few words in conjunction with each other.

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5
votes
2answers
772 views

What is an umbrella in Latin?

I realize that the English word "umbrella" smells like a diminutive of umbra, "shadow". However, all mentions of an "umbrella" from ancient Rome or Greece I have found concern protection from the Sun, ...
3
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1answer
68 views

How is time period expressed in Latin?

How is time period expressed in Latin, e.g. "from Jan 1 to Mar 31"? I notice there are two prepositions meaning "from", "ab" and "ex". What's their difference? Which should I use for time period?
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2answers
245 views

What is oculus a diminutive of?

My Latin teacher has said that osculum is the diminutive of os, describing the way one puckers one's mouth when kissing, and that the -culus ending is a diminutive. So what is oculus a diminutive of?
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3answers
108 views

A word for national and other cuisines

I am looking for a word for "cuisine". For example, I don't know how to say the following in Latin: I like Nepalese cuisine, but I haven't found any suitable restaurants here. I don't know which ...
6
votes
1answer
95 views

What is an academic fellow?

What is the Latin word used for a fellow of a college or an academic society? In particular, are there attested uses somewhere to be found? I am looking for a translation of "fellow" which is or has ...
2
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1answer
108 views

How to capture the meaning and connotation of Self-respect, Compassion, Curiosity?

I have a friend who asked me for help translating some words into Latin (because I took a few courses over a decade ago...), which the internet does for us, but we're not sure that the web is ...
4
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1answer
695 views

Is “adeptus astra telepathica” grammatically correct?

In the multimedia franchise Warhammer 40,000, a space empire known as the Imperium of Man uses various Latin phrases to name their various government departments. I looked these up in Latin ...
2
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1answer
131 views

Is there any other latin translation for the english term, “Butterfly” aside from Papilio?

For some reason I was looking through my older notes on Latin translations and saw that Gloria worked as a translation for Butterfly. I've been looking all through the net to confirm my suspicions ...
4
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4answers
742 views

Is there a Latin verb for enabling?

This question is based on the same book "Wolmar Schildt — sata uudissanaa" my question yesterday. The second of the two words that caught my attention was the Finnish verb "mahdollistaa", which was ...
2
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1answer
118 views

Is there a classical Latin verb for furnishing?

I recently read a booklet called "Wolmar Schildt — sata uudissanaa" which is built around a list of a hundred neologisms by Wolmar Schildt (1810–1893), one of the most active promoters of ...
3
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2answers
78 views

A polite word for female facilities

What would be a good Latin word for "women", "ladies", "female(s)", or the like when I want to indicate the gender designation of a sauna or a toilet? In English I would choose "ladies", or perhaps in ...
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0answers
67 views

Is there a neuter noun (word) that has different nominative and accusative form? [duplicate]

I thought neuter noun's accusative and nominative forms are always the same but is there any exception? I need any neuter word that has different nominative and accusative form. Doesn't matter if it's ...
9
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1answer
2k views

Did the Romans have a word for “volcano”? How did they describe Vesuvius?

I'm curious to know whether the Romans had a word for "volcano", and, more specifically, whether they thought of Mount Vesuvius as a volcano.1 After the eruption of AD 79, I'm sure they had some ...
5
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3answers
224 views

Different registers of urination

In English and Finnish (and probably most languages) there are different verbs for urination to be used under different circumstances: clinical: urinate, mictuate; virtsata childish: pee, wee; ...
6
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3answers
432 views

How would you say 'caring man'; Homo ________?

I think the trait that really distinguishes the better part of humanity from the rest of the animal kingdom is the capacity to love and care. Homo Sapiens means "wise man". How would you say "caring"...
4
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3answers
313 views

Creating a “fictional” last name, meaning “wild card”

I am on a quest to create a new last name for myself. I like the idea of "wildcard," particularly in the computing sense: as a placeholder for anything, however I want something that sounds more ...
9
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3answers
833 views

What is an eve?

It is New Year's Eve today, and there are other eves throughout the year. What would be a good Latin translation for "eve"1? The English word appears to be etymologically related to "evening" and ...
3
votes
1answer
102 views

How to translate “pesto”?

What would be a good Latin translation for the sauce pesto? I see a couple of possible routes, but it's not clear to me at all what I should call the sauce in a modern context: It seems to come from ...
10
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1answer
3k views

What is the difference between Spiritus and Anima?

Both spiritus and anima seem to have the definition of soul, but it is mentioned on numerous sites that they are different from one another. What is the difference?
4
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3answers
269 views

What is plant-based or vegetarian food?

Is there a Latin adjective which means "vegetarian" or "plant-based" and can be applied to food? In this context, I don't need to make a distinction between vegetarian and vegan, for example; I just ...
5
votes
1answer
168 views

What is Latin for “relate”?

I mean that sense of relate which we find in: A relates to B as C does to D. or when we speak of A and B's relation, meaning whatever may be said of A and B without further specification. If ...
4
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1answer
200 views

Meaning and etymology of 'vinnola' or 'vinola' or 'vinnus' (music term)?

I stumbled onto the word 'vinola' or 'vinnola' and the allegedly related 'vinnus' in treatises on medieval chant. I don't see these words in Wiktionary or any online dictionaries. Does anybody know ...
4
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1answer
159 views

A correct title for the book from the Evil Dead movies?

In the Evil Dead movies the infamous book is given an inconsistently spelled name, which vanished in the other installments. The scripts for the original movie and the remake titled it "Naturan ...
3
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2answers
266 views

How to translate “fan”?

What would be a good Latin translation for "fan", a fanatic supporter or follower of a sports team, an artist, or some such thing? I realize that the English word is short for "fanatic", which in ...
5
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2answers
286 views

Is there a colorful term for an uninvited guest?

Is there a colorful Latin term for an uninvited guest? Of course I can say something like conviva non invitatus, but I wonder if there is something less boring, akin to the English "gatecrasher" or ...
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0answers
509 views

Latin translation of the word “software”?

Would it be correct to translate software (soft-ware) as "mollis mercimonium" ?
6
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1answer
424 views

What does “ratio doloris” mean?

What does ratio doloris mean? I want to translate ratio doloris from Latin to English in all contexts for which it would make grammatical sense, because I want to know if -is is the correct suffix for ...
5
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1answer
264 views

Different levels of friends

Are there Latin words for friends of different depth? A more shallow friend might perhaps be called "mate" or "pal", and a deeper one "friend". Perhaps a shallow friend could also be called "...
5
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1answer
95 views

What is the meaning of the phrase “solitō māiōre”?

A fellow member of a Latin Discord server I participate in posted this link to an article with a question regarding how one would interpret the phrase "solitō māiōre". Despite our efforts to interpret ...
5
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1answer
175 views

Latin for one who doesn't believe in unicorns?

What word could we use to describe someone who doesn't believe in unicorns? Ideally, looking for a (newly made or existing) Latin-based word.
6
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1answer
107 views

A rough comparison of different derivatives of plere

There seems to be a large number of verbs derived from plere, all meaning "to fill" to some extent: plere, supplere, complere, implere, explere, opplere. I understand that replere means "to refill" ...
2
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1answer
67 views

How to translate “clearance”?

How could I translate the word "clearance" to Latin? I mean it in the sense of a security clearance, a background check to gain authorization to access some information or a location. The most fitting ...
3
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1answer
149 views

Is the phrase 'Nec mea dona tibi studio disperta fideli' incorrect?

What is the difference between Ne mea dona tibi studio disperta fideli and Nec mea dona tibi studio disperta fideli and is the latter version, which differs in the single letter 'c' only, ...
3
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1answer
246 views

What is “spam”?

Having taken care of some spam profiles on this site recently, I started to wonder how "spam" might best be translated to Latin. Since the word "spam" itself appears not to have a Latin origin, the ...
4
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1answer
295 views

How would you translate Marcus Aurelius's self-description from Greek into Latin?

Marcus Aurelius describes himself succinctly and humbly in the third book of his Meditations. I would like to come up with a Latin translation, but have a few questions on diction. ἔτι δὲ ὁ ἐν σοὶ ...
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0answers
68 views

What is “cold war”?

How should I translate "cold war" in Latin? I can see two ways to approach this, using a classical phrase for a similar hostile political situation, or finding a suitable adjective for "cold" to go ...
3
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1answer
217 views

What is “site” in Latin?

I have been using the simple-minded translation situs (fourth declension) for "[web]site", and I have used it to refer to this site, among others. I'm not convinced this is a good choice, as I have no ...
6
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1answer
59 views

Translating 'multos labores subierunt'

I am trying to translate the following sentence: Diu in undis errabant et multos labores subierunt. I am able to translate the first part as: For a long time the ship was wandering in the waves ...
4
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1answer
107 views

Is this meaning of usury coming from Latin?

In this paper there is a quotation from an early 20th century document by an economist (italics in original): No bank should be allowed to charge any such percentage as 7% for its services. The ...
2
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2answers
108 views

With which verb can I borrow from other languages?

If I want to describe that the word philosophia was borrowed from Greek to Latin, which Latin verb can I use for borrowing? Verbs like commodare and mutuari sound a little weird for this kind of loan. ...
4
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1answer
285 views

Maple trees in Ancient Rome

I was reading about maple trees this afternoon, and I was delighted to find out that the genus name is "Acer", named after the Latin adjective meaning "sharp", because maple wood was firm, sharp, and ...
5
votes
1answer
80 views

When did “comment” stop meaning “lie”?

A commentum (from comminiscor) is, according to the Elementary Latin Dictionary: an invention, fabrication, pretence, fiction, falsehood At some point, a commentarium (and, I presume, its cognate ...
7
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2answers
469 views

Belonging in the sense of belonging somewhere

What is a Latin phrase to express the sense of belonging to a particular place? How can this be translated from English to Latin?
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6answers
555 views

“Mind the gap!”

I am currently in London, and the Underground has been kind enough to repeat this warning numerous times: Please mind the gap between the train and the platform! Having heard the same phrase over ...
8
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1answer
117 views

asustilbar (?): a strange word from the Tractatus de Herbis

There is a following illustration (f. 28r) in the Tractatus de Herbis: (Here is a link to an image with high resolution.) It is written in Wikipedia that "Apparently the artist has confused his ...
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0answers
115 views

What is the relation between -men and -mentum?

When answering this question about incrementum, I recalled the similarity of the suffixes -mentum and -men. If the linked Wiktionary pages are to be trusted, they are etymologically related, both ...
3
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1answer
59 views

How to say pattern recognizer/analyzer or describe someone who can differentiate patterns?

How to say pattern recognizer/analyzer or describe someone who can differentiate patterns? The closest thing that I could find was homo analyticus. Are there any better descriptors available? Homo ...
8
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1answer
396 views

What is the difference between ira and furor?

The words ira and furor are quite similar, but apparently not synonymous. I found myself unable to give a clear comparison of the two words. How would you describe the difference between the meanings ...
2
votes
1answer
87 views

What is whole grain?

How do you say "whole grain" in Latin? The expressions in Romance languages are fairly similar, and based on them I would guess granum integrum. For example, I might say panem grani integri edere malo....
8
votes
1answer
399 views

Can infans refer to children who can speak?

The word infans means basically "speechless", as the connection to the verb fari immediately suggests. One specific meaning of this word is a small child (III in the linked L&S entry). I assume ...

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