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Questions tagged [vocabulary]

This tag is for questions concerning the meaning and usage of individual words or a few words in conjunction with each other.

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7 votes
1 answer
362 views

Is the word order of "Iura novit curia" used for emphasis?

Is the change in the word order used for emphasis, and how would we translate "iura novit curia" to English while maintaining the word order? We don't have cases and there is the danger of ...
George Ntoulos's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
220 views

Dramatis Personae but for important words

What is a phrase that acts like Dramatis Personae (for listing the important characters of a play) but for the important words? I've thought of Dramatis Vocabulum, but I'm sure there's a better answer ...
BearWizard's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
1k views

Translate "Now and Forever" into Latin

On Gary Numan's new album Intruder, he has a song called Now and Forever, which also uses that line repeatedly throughout the song. How would you express this in Latin? The lyrics are from a first-...
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,652
7 votes
1 answer
479 views

List of locations in a play (analogue of ‘Dramatis Personae’)

The phrase ‘Dramatis Personae’ is conventionally used to describe a list of characters in a play. What would be an analogous phrase to describe a list of places/locations/settings (eg ‘Elsinore, ...
Richard Inglis's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
151 views

How this phrase could be written in classical latin?

How would the phrase "Vi veri vniversum vivvs vici" be written in Classical Latin? As far as I know, it is by Christopher Marlowe, originally written as Vi veri vniversum vivus vici, used in ...
André Carneiro Costa's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
2k views

How do you say "I am vaccinated" in Latin?

How do you say that you have been vaccinated in Latin? I'm not sure how to construct this tense, and I'm not familiar with a modern Latin verb for "vaccinate".
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,652
14 votes
3 answers
2k views

Did the Romans have a word for "genius"?

I am looking for a Latin word corresponding to the common modern English sense of the word "genius", a person with extraordinary ability in a specific field. I do not want to refer to the ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
344 views

Adverbial intensifier

Populi! I try to find a word in Latin which couriers this specific sense: right, just, the very; and still found nothing. I mean that I can find it in many another languages: right here, just behind, ...
T1nts's user avatar
  • 183
5 votes
1 answer
168 views

How to say "bad batch" in Latin?

Suppose one of the four batches of amphorae produced yesterday at my pottery is discovered to be deficient and has to be thrown away instead of being sold. What should I call such a "bad batch&...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
976 views

Differences between cano and canto

In Cap. X of LLPSI, Ørberg introduces the verb cano, having introduced canto in a previous chapter. The usage of both so far is just sing, but are there more nuanced differences between the two? From ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,652
5 votes
1 answer
1k views

How do you say "anything is possible" in Latin?

If you wanted to say that anything is possible in Latin, how would you do it? One possibility I thought of was something like: Omne posse I'm not sure that omne quite captures the nuance of anything ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,652
14 votes
2 answers
1k views

What would an election campaign be called in Latin?

Our site has its first election now and the voting period starts in 12 hours. Therefore it is a good moment to figure out some of the election vocabulary in Latin. What would be a good Latin word for ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
132 views

What does "Prout necessitas ferat atque experientia suffragetur" translate to in English?

What would this latin sentence mean : "Prout necessitas ferat atque experientia suffragetur" ? No idea... Note: found in this link
Andrew's user avatar
  • 149
6 votes
1 answer
484 views

In Matthew 27, why does the Vulgate call the graves of people who were resurrected along with Jesus "monumentum", but Jesus's grave "sepulchrum"?

In Matthew 27, why does the Vulgate call the graves of people who were resurrected along with Jesus "monumentum", but Jesus's grave "sepulchrum"? Matthew 27:53 says, in Vulgate: ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
263 views

Latin justification for the English word tradent

I was reading the following thread https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/tradent.3819293/ - There it is stated that the English word tradent, according to the OED means Chiefly in Rabbinic Jewish ...
chasly - supports Monica's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
636 views

Translate "I will cast my shadow" into Latin

I want to translate I will cast my shadow into Latin. This phrase is inspired from a poem by Horace, that has the line: Pulvis et Umbra Sumus My interpretation of this is that we are simply our ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,652
5 votes
1 answer
226 views

Homeric hapax legomenon ἐγγεινομαι -- is it not real?

There is a 2018 thesis by Alexandra Kozak, "Le Dictionnaire des hapax dans la poésie grecque archaïque, d'Homère à Eschyle," freely downloadable from https://tel.archives-ouvertes.fr/tel-...
user avatar
11 votes
3 answers
4k views

Could one consider using Latin as a daily casual language these days?

I just saw a video asking like how would one say I just had an avocado toast and thought about some of the new stuff that didn't exist back then. How would we integrate new words into the Latin ...
Johhan Santana's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
839 views

What is the ancient Greek word for apprenticeship?

I'm looking for an ancient Greek word that denotes a trainee craftsman's regime of study under a master, I found the word μαθητεία but I'm unsure if that is a word in ancient Greek or only in modern ...
The Kings Raven's user avatar
28 votes
4 answers
7k views

ATM in Vatican City: "Inserito scidulam quaeso ut faciundam cognoscas rationem"

The automated teller machines in Vatican City show this screen when awaiting a card: Could someone, quaeso, break this down word by word? There are a number of things here that I find puzzling or ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
220 views

Determining the etymology of words in Latin

I am interested in the etymology of words in Latin. Is there a resource available that could help me determine if a word is specifically from Old, New or Vulgar Latin etc. according to a time it is ...
aitía's user avatar
  • 251
6 votes
2 answers
864 views

Why -ώς in αἰδώς?

The word αἰδώς means awe, shame, or respect. There are related words such as αἰδοῖος. I feel like I ought to be training my brain to recognize inflections in order to get clues as to meaning, but as ...
user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
173 views

What is the present participle of fio?

Horace wrote the line brevis esse laboro, obscurus fio in De Arte Poetica Liber. I want to use the latter half of the phrase, obscurus fio, as a song title but I'd like it to be in the form of I am ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,652
3 votes
1 answer
64 views

What is "cum supportatione"?

In Epistolae obscurorum virorum, letter 3: 'Mus miser est antro qui solum clauditur uno.’ Sic etiam possum dicere de me cum supportatione, venerabilis vir, quia essem pauper si haberem tantum unum ...
d_e's user avatar
  • 11.2k
7 votes
3 answers
933 views

Translate "Those in Whom Deserts Hide" into Classical Latin

I am translating the phrase Those in Whom Deserts Hide, which was inspired by a line in the poem Dionysian Dithyrambs by Nietzsche ("The desert grows: woe to him in whom deserts hide"). This ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,652
3 votes
1 answer
187 views

How do you say something is "in flux" in Classical Latin?

In English we have in flux, which you can use to say that something is in a state of change. How do you use an adjective that way in Latin? Could you use fluxus in ablative/accusative case with the ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,652
7 votes
1 answer
1k views

Is this word "manuducant" a typo or an obscure word?

I have the following sentence from Euler's De Serie Lambertina (I've already asked half a dozen questions about this paper), and one of the words manuducant (manvdvcant), shown in the snippet below, ...
Sam Gallagher's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
483 views

Act 1, Act 2, ... in a play, in Greek

In an ancient Greek play, what word would we use to refer to the different acts? Μέρος? Λόγος? Woodhouse doesn't seem to have anything relevant under the noun "act."
user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
1k views

The best way to say Sinners

I'd like to create an aesthetic with the phrase "Remember that you must die, sinners" - targeted at the viewers. I know the first part is memento mori, but what is the best translation of &...
Virgae's user avatar
  • 83
5 votes
2 answers
517 views

Tables of Greek expressions for time, place, and logic

I'm trying to build my vocabulary in koine using flashcards, and so far have had pretty good success attaining a decent level of reading fluency, e.g., I can get through the first couple of chapters ...
user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
163 views

What does causa procurans mean?

What is the definition of the expression causa procurans, and who may have been the originator of the term? I found this expression used by a number of people, but I haven't been able to find it ...
Expedito Bipes's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
56 views

Create new word: super + portare

I want to create a new word by analogy to "support" with the prefix super-. According to Google the modern English word "support" comes from Latin supportare and is composed of sub-...
Foivos's user avatar
  • 33
4 votes
1 answer
3k views

What is the word for knowledge in Greek?

I read that there are two version depending on intrinsic value. So that it is either intellectual knowledge or divine knowledge, knowledge from within. And is there a difference between Ancient Greek ...
ShiaForced's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
205 views

Is "evidenter" the correct translation for "obviously!"?

I've searched the forum but found no answer to my question. How would one say obviously in Latin? As in answering a question with a "it's option b, obviously!" Online dictionaries have given ...
Iza's user avatar
  • 51
4 votes
0 answers
82 views

Names for digits or numbers

How would you say "I write zeroes and ones" or "I need a fiver" or "the number seven" in Latin? There are a couple of cases where in some languages one uses instead of a ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
951 views

Seize your future

What would "Seize your future/the future" be in Latin? I've got Carpe futurum, but my latin is quite poor. I want to use it as a motto for an educational company. I want to use it as it ...
Luke Adams's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
216 views

Translation Request, English to Latin

How can I translate this sentence to Latin, "Man in the palace! Remember death, live with fear of death. Leave us alone." I translate like that but... I don't know, I guess, I did a mistake. ...
Laques's user avatar
  • 23
2 votes
1 answer
137 views

Ubi jus ibi remedium

I am trying to make sense of the phrase ubi jus ibi remedium. It seems incomplete, and I feel I should add two verbs and something to separate the two sentences, for example: Ubi jus est, ibi est ...
George Ntoulos's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
127 views

What is a street sign in Latin?

It recently occurred to me that I don't know what to call a street sign in Latin. I know that a general word for "sign" is signum, but the dictionaries I consulted do not specify whether it ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
274 views

Two kinds of falling

The English verb "fall", when the subject is a human, has two main kinds of literal1 meaning as far as I can tell: A change of position: Moving suddenly from higher elevation to lower. (The ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
445 views

'i have never made' in latin

I've tried to search for this phrase, but I haven't found an answer. I looked it up on google translate and it says 'nunquam fecit.' I don't think it's correct.
jonathan's user avatar
  • 125
6 votes
4 answers
2k views

Translate "Eat, Drink, and be merry" to Latin

In the spirit of the holidays, I was thinking about how you would say Eat! Drink! Be Merry! in Latin (or written as Eat, drink, and be merry!). There are multiple words for each, but I'm not sure ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,652
4 votes
1 answer
1k views

translation for Strength, love and courage to Latin

I would like to engrave a piece in Latin for my teenage son with our “family motto.” The motto is strength, love and courage. He is studying Latin and I want to be sure the word choice is accurate. ...
tara's user avatar
  • 41
10 votes
1 answer
333 views

Lonely vs. alone

A person is alone when there are no other people around. A person is lonely when the presence of other people is missed. Neither implies the other; you can be lonely but not alone or alone but not ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
170 views

Composition of a word ἡμιόλιος

The Ancient Greek word ἡμιόλιος means literally "one and a half", referring to the ratio 3:2 and the interval of a perfect fifth in music. I wonder how this word is composed of: is it ἡμι- (...
kore's user avatar
  • 517
5 votes
2 answers
253 views

How would one say "Please let me do X thing"

Was wondering how one would say "Please let me do X thing" e.g. "Please let me love/win/see" Would you use some sort of impersonal construction, or would one use "permitto&...
Drwhops's user avatar
  • 151
5 votes
1 answer
90 views

What is the meaning of "positive acceptus" in Gauss' Disquisitiones Arithmeticae §131?

From Gauss' Disquisitiones Arithmeticae §131: Sī p est numerus prīmus fōrmae 4n+1, erit +p, sī vērō p fōrmae 4n+3, erit -p residuum vel nōn-residuum cuiusvīs numerī prīmī quī positīvē acceptus ipsīus ...
Leaky Nun's user avatar
  • 837
2 votes
3 answers
321 views

How do I say 'There is always a reason for a drink'?

in Dutch we say 'er is altijd een reden voor een borrel', which I want engraved on a whisky glass for my friend. How do you say 'There is always a reason for a drink' in Latin? On the internet, I find ...
rieneke's user avatar
  • 29
5 votes
4 answers
1k views

What are some ancient words that mean forgiveness?

What are some ancient words that mean forgiveness? I’m looking for words that were used before the common era (before 0 CE). I’m looking for words from Latin, Greek, German, and other languages. These ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 12.1k
4 votes
1 answer
98 views

How to change the "Ex libris" (from books) used in books to get the meaning "from diaries"?

I do not know any Latin at all. Could you please help me to solve the following problem? I am wondering what would be a correct equivalent for "ex libris" used in books to change the meaning ...
Lucie P's user avatar
  • 41

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