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Questions tagged [vocabulary]

This tag is for questions concerning the meaning and usage of individual words or a few words in conjunction with each other.

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Meaning of 'illesas' in Magna Carta

In the Magna Carta, article 1, it says In primis concessisse Deo et hac presenti carta nostra confirmasse, pro nobis et heredibus nostris in perpetuum quod Anglicana ecclesia libera sit, et habeat ...
LarsH's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
2k views

Is "Ad astra, per sanguinem" the correct translation of "To the stars, through blood."

I am wanting to get this phrase as a tattoo. I want to make sure this is the best way to translate this to match the original meaning in English. Also, I am wondering about this alternative phrase &...
KyotoSunsetDreams's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
1k views

How is that there are two different words, comparo, that appear to be identical?

In various dictionaries, like Lewis & Short, there are two completely separate entries for the word comparo, which otherwise appear to be identical in conjugation. How is that these two entries ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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5 votes
0 answers
116 views

Classical Translation for "aura, vibrations, feeling"

I have struggled in finding an adequate translation for the above mentioned words, that designate the subtle ambiance that something is thought to emit or convey. Like "she gives me negative ...
Ruh Muhaccer's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
113 views

What is the meaning of praeprimis?

I came across the word "praeprimis" when reading some 17th century Latin (Experimenta nova, Otto von Guericke, b. 4 ch. 15 ). To my best guess, it's a combination of "praecipue" ...
Sam Gallagher's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
140 views

Translation of "The ant labors for the good of the nest"

I'm looking to translate "The ant labors for the good of the nest", or to rephrase, "The ant works for the benefit of the nest/hive/colony". So far I've come up with: formica ...
Caw's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
200 views

What does 'spatio pollicarir emotius' mean in Otto von Guericke's Experimenta Nova?

In Otto von Guericke's Experimenta Nova (1672) he says (in reference to experiments showing how a feather floats above and sometimes is reattracted to a globe of sulphur): Filum lineum, si acumini ...
Sam Gallagher's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
55 views

Is postid a derived form or an archaic form of post?

I pondered this since reading some Plautus. It seems similar to postea (post ea), just being in singular (so post id?), or perhaps it is the obsolete earlier form of post itself. Just curious if there ...
VivatLinguaLatina's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
79 views

Meanings of 'furo'

I am finding some conflicting information about the word furo. According to Lewis and Short, it only means furo/furere, a defective 3rd conjugation word meaning to be in a rage. In L&S, only furor ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
139 views

What would be the name for government for, from, and by

The people Shareholders The king Investors Customers Tax payers Plus explanation. From sources, I've heard that those are Democracy Metochocracy Monarchy Ependocracy Pelatarchy What? I may be wrong....
user4951's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
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Is there a Latin word for 225th anniversary?

If bicentennial is the Latin word for the 200th anniversary, what word would one use for the 225th anniversary?
Michael Barnett's user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
1k views

Why 'Vir' is the only word of 2nd declension with -ir ending?

I'd like a detailed explanation of the word 'Vir' denclesion. Vir is the only word of the second denclension with 'ir' ending. What is the reason for this phenomenon? Anyone knows a research about it ...
Paulo Ferr's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
217 views

Words for "Biased Arguments" in Latin

Is there such an expression in Latin that describes the following situations: Someone using arguments based on fear, patriotism and race/nationalism instead of logic for the purpose of trying to ...
stats_noob's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
145 views

Interpolation of words by scholars leads to changes in the meaning

The following sentence is from "De architecture" a 1 BCE book(English translation) Uti autem Aristarchus Samius mathematicus vigore magno rationes varietatis disciplinis de eadem <re> ...
Abhishek Yadav's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
60 views

Reading of "licet" in the following sentence

The following sentence is from a 5th-century book [12] Rursus terra accepto solis lumine clarescit tantummodo, non relucet, luna speculi instar lumen quo illustratur emittit, quia illa aeris et aquae,...
Abhishek Yadav's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
94 views

What does "passit" mean?

I encountered the word "passit" in the following statement by Lucretius: Accidere ex una flamma parva incendia passit. I cannot find the word passit in dictionaries. What does it mean?
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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1 answer
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Translating "I will go all the way" [duplicate]

I need help translating the English sentence "I will go all the way" into Latin. This will be used as a motto. Thanks in advance :)
dms93's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
103 views

Relationship between subeo and subeor? or polliceo and polliceor?

The compound word sub+eo seems to appear in two different forms, subeo and subeor. One is a normal indicative form, the other deponent. They appear to mean more or less the same thing. What is the ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
194 views

Is "Fantasia" a classical Latin word? What was its original meaning?

I'm indecisive as to what title to chose for a novel I finished writing. I went for a pseudo-Latin title : "Apex Fantasia" as it is a fantasy novel. But I still wonder if I can find ...
user11151's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
143 views

to make a pass at/ hit on

Has anyone in their reading come across Latin words for to ‘hit on’ in the sense of speaking or behaving in a way that shows they want to have a sexual relationship with you. [informal] ‘She was ...
Jonathan Hadfield's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
298 views

How to say "oath-breaker" in Latin?

How can I translate "oath-breaker" properly into Latin in reference to losing one's faith?
David's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
76 views

form to learn a new word in

When I learn a new word in Latin, should I learn it in a form: excluding diacritic (pax - peace) or: including diacritic (pāx - peace) ? (question number one) I have never seen the diacritic ...
user1257's user avatar
  • 115
1 vote
0 answers
50 views

Ex + sisto preposition choice

Why is it exsisto instead of subsisto? Between the verbs sisto and ἵστημι there seems to be an almost perfect correspondence in meaning but the prepositions switch from exsisto to ὑφίστημι (which ...
George Ntoulos's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
607 views

many, much, a lot of in Latin

Can the Latin word multus be used both for expressing greater amounts of both countable and uncountable nouns? (in English there is many for countable, much for uncountable or the universal a lot of) ...
user1257's user avatar
  • 115
3 votes
0 answers
73 views

On words with non-Classical meanings in LLPSI

I found Lingua Latina per se Illustrata(LLPSI) use the word kalendārium for calendar (as in Chap. 13, and the official Latin-English wordbook), but in both dictionaries L&S and OLD there is just ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
359 views

How would you translate "The Adorned" for use as a collective title?

I took a few years of Latin back in high school, but my understanding of the language never really surpassed novice levels. I've been brainstorming names for a wolf pack in a story of mine; a lot of ...
Coyoteskip's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
153 views

How to express a prayer intention

I'm new-ish to speaking Latin - specifically praying in Latin. When praying with my family, we like to express prayer intentions before beginning (eg. "For so-and-so" or "For charity&...
James P's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
365 views

How does one translate "a fighting thing" and "a running away thing"?

In the same way "a thinking thing" is translated into Latin to res cogitans, how would you translate in Latin "a fighting thing" and "a running away thing"?
Ansonī Bōdo's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
148 views

Is there a Simple Latin?

For english, a simple version of the language, called Simple English has been defined — an english-based controlled language — as an aid to teaching english to non-native speakers. Has it ever been an ...
pápilió's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
50 views

Are there different words for an excerpt and its location in Latin?

In Latin, locus can be the passage of a text (e.g. Cicero says he is going to translate a passage in one of his speeches and uses locus if I remember correctly) but it can also be the location of the ...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
828 views

What does the word "adidum" mean?

In a book in Latin, I found the sentence "Adidum vina" — Something (?) the wines. What does "adidum" mean?
pápilió's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
71 views

How would you translate "Mentalist" into Latin?

How would mentalist be translated into Latin? There is some debate about what constitutes mentalism, but to me I would summarize as the use of psychology, cold reading, skilled intuition, and careful ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,652
8 votes
2 answers
626 views

How would you translate "rank" or "level" to Latin?

In English, we can talk about people or things as being at a certain level or rank. For example, in gaming systems, you might have a character or ability that is level 10, or level 20, etc. What would ...
Adam's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
39 views

What would be the Latin equivalent of the English noun, "reflex"?

The English word "reflex" comes from the late Latin word reflexus, to bend back, turn away. Is there a Latin noun equivalent to reflex in the modern sense? Classical is preferred, but any ...
Adam's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
205 views

hoc pacto a synonym for quo modo?

I am working through the notorious Rosetta Stone Latin and they have the phrase "hoc pacto" seemingly as a synonym for quo modo. So, for example, there are sentences like: Solum hoc pacto ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
173 views

Expressions of contempt or credulity in Latin

I am looking for a Latin equivalent of ‘my eye/ my arse’ as an expression of contempt or incredulity in Latin or less emphatic ‘I don’t think! e.g. He’s a model of good behaviour, my eye/ my arse/ I ...
Jonathan Hadfield's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
248 views

First Declension Singular, Gen or Dat?

I'm learning the first declension and I am confused on how the word "terrae" is used as a genitive but can be used as a dative. How do I translate if I am given just the word "terrae?&...
Evans's user avatar
  • 51
3 votes
1 answer
255 views

Nomen agentis of 'Quaerere'

Everybody knows words like Terminator, Navigator, Laudator, ... For verbs from the a conjugation is seems pretty simple to build the Nomen Agentis, what about words like 'Quaerere'? I thought about ...
Cyb3rKo's user avatar
  • 626
5 votes
1 answer
130 views

What people are considered to be part of "populus"?

Lewis and Short give the following in the dictionary entry for populus: The people, opp. to the Senate, in the formula senatus populusque Romanus (abbreviated S. P. Q. R.), saep.; cf.: “et patres in ...
Adam's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
512 views

How do you say “mask” in Latin?

What would be an appropriate Latin word to refer to the kind of mask you wear to fend of COVID-19? Dictionaries give me “persona” as the appropriate word for mask, but that seems that this would ...
Florianus's user avatar
  • 483
5 votes
1 answer
123 views

How to say something is on discount

"Discount" in the regular meaning: a product now costs less than it used to (usually deliberately by the seller). I saw facio pretium is a phrase meaning "to set a price". So maybe ...
d_e's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
51 views

Sources for listings of alternative forms of common words

Do you know any good sources for listings of alternative forms of common words. For example most websites, books and tables only show "meo" for the Ablative of "meus", but there ...
Cyb3rKo's user avatar
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9 votes
2 answers
284 views

Are “magna” and “maxima” incorrectly translated in these examples? (Seneca Epistula I)

I am reading the Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium by Seneca, both in the original Latin and in various translations for comparison/understanding (English, French, Italian, German). For the following ...
polygokko's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
189 views

To think of someone

I have been trying to translate this English phrase into Latin properly, and I started to check it in some resources. In this text it goes: "..., cum de tuis cogitas,...". And I have no idea ...
StackOverflowUser's user avatar
11 votes
2 answers
1k views

Latin to Latin Dictionary

I have a few Latin to English and English to Latin dictionaries, but I was wondering whether there is such a thing as a Latin to Latin dictionary, and, if so, where one might be found. There are, of ...
Vtex's user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
346 views

Translation of Fratres Occasi

Someone in my organization is trying to sell memorial challenge coins with the text "Fratres Occasi", which they claim means "Fallen Brothers". This seems, not right to me. My ...
user10786's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
548 views

What would be the best word for "destroyer"?

There are a few different words I've found with the meaning of "one who destroys or ruins", though most are fairly rare or only poetical. Is there a more commonly used word that I am missing?...
Adam's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
1k views

What is the best way to say "OK" in Latin as an exclamation?

The word "Ok" in English can be used in multiple ways, though one of the most simple is as an exclamation that one was told something. As an example: Iulius: Marcus, I had your toga dry-...
Adam's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
58 views

What is the best Latin counterpart for 'reach' or 'contact'?

In English you can use the verbs "reach" or "contact" to mean being in contact with someone without specifying the method. When you don't want to specify whether you are writing a ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
2k views

How do say something like "for a good time, call Aemilia" in Latin?

Here in the US, a cliched bit of graffiti you can often find written on the stall of a public bathroom is: For a good time, call Aemilia. The phrase implies that calling Aemilia will result in some ...
Adam's user avatar
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