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Questions tagged [vocabulary]

This tag is for questions concerning the meaning and usage of individual words or a few words in conjunction with each other.

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7 votes
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Is there a way to say the phrase "Buy time" in Latin?

Is there a way to say the phrase "Buy time", as in to buy oneself time? Example sentence: "He bought himself some time" or "He bought himself time"
Nomad1004's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
326 views

How do you say the verb "switch/switch to" in Latin?

I want to know how you say the idea of "switch to" in Latin. I wasn't able to find a translation For example if I want to say something like: "I was using this tool, but I switched to a ...
Nomad1004's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
93 views

What's the best way to say the noun "Objective" in Latin?

What's the best way to say "Objective" in Latin? As in, "Your next objective is to do [insert thing here]"?
Nomad1004's user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
2k views

Best modern translation for "Emperor"?

The word "Emperor" seems a bit hard to pin down in Latin when looking for a constant expression to use, because of its multiple synonyms that seem to have been employed frequently throughout ...
Victor BC's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
146 views

What is the best Latin translation of 'towards truth'?

I am looking to create a Substack publication where I can share articles I have written on philosophy. I want to choose a name for the website that best summarises or encapsulates the nature of the ...
Joseph's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
749 views

Is there a singular of 'mānēs'?

The mānēs or dī mānēs, the benevolent spirits of the underworld, are usually addressed as a collective. But what if I want to talk about one specific benevolent spirit? Is the singular (*manis perhaps?...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
76 views

What is going on with the symbol in the weight here?

So this is an image from William Musgrave's account of the Southbroom Hoard discovered outside Devizes, Wiltshire, in England in 1714. They seem to be some local's cache hidden away around the reign ...
lly's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
92 views

What would big/difficult/formal words be like in Latin?

Latin has approximately 40.000 words. A really small number for a language. How can we know when the word is "big" or formal in Latin? English uses the words from Latin to sound formal. I ...
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4 votes
1 answer
131 views

Morituri - Grammar

Basic, I'm sure, but I've read that this form is infinitive - to die - but also can mean 'we who are about to die'. I'm newish to Latin grammar - what is the name of the form/case(?) that could ...
alan redknap's user avatar
20 votes
3 answers
4k views

Is there a Latin equivalent for this particular nsfw term?

Thanks to Martial, I've come across a decent variety of sexual terms in Latin. Unfortunately, these words are generally difficult to look up in dictionaries, because of the archaic style Latin ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
136 views

How would you say "grass" as in "Green grass covers his grave."?

I am trying to translate some lyrics of a patriotic Croatian song in Latin. Here is what I've got thus far: Non sunt heroes, non sunt Croati, ita fortes ut Jelačić erat. Sed nunc eum atra terra tegit,...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
369 views

amatus or amatum - which one is the perfect passive participle form

I've just started studying Wheelock. In the Vocabula section, the entry for amo is amo, amare, amavi, amatum. Yet most dictionaries give the past participle as amatus. Which is correct?
Brian Birmingham's user avatar
7 votes
0 answers
67 views

16th century vocabulary - harpsichord

In a 16th century text about musical tuning by Benedetti, the author provides this diagram, which he uses to describe his process of tuning the notes on a harpsichord: In the text, he begins his ...
Thomas Nicholson's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
279 views

What is difference between adit and advenit?

In LLPSI I was introduced to two verbs "adit" and "advenit", but what is difference between them if both of them mean "to go to"? Same to "abit" and "exit&...
Umicron's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
266 views

Translating "I came, I saw, I cried" in Latin for a yearbook quote

I am searching for a yearbook quote, and had the idea of modifying the quote "Veni vidi vici", by replacing the last verb with "I cried". Having searched, online, I have found the ...
Juju1234's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
349 views

How to say 'that' as a conjunction as in "I'm pleased that it is friday"?

I see this use of 'that' in English sentences all the time connecting subordinate clauses and such. I was wondering how'd you say something like "I'm pleased that it is Friday" or "He ...
MWB_Primus's user avatar
12 votes
1 answer
3k views

What is the Latin word for zebra?

I was searching for animals in Latin, and I ended up finding that the Romans knew zebras, and they used them to pull chariots. They also had the name "hippotigris". However, I couldn’t find ...
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5 votes
3 answers
1k views

Translating English Mother Quotes

I am getting a tattoo for my mother who passed 3 years ago. I think any of the following would be beautiful: “A mother/Your mother is always with you” “A mothers love never dies” “A mothers love lives ...
emma's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
465 views

Translation of 'nothing'

What is the most accurate translation of the phrase, 'from nothing, [back] to nothing.'? my own attempt is 'Ex nihilo in nihilum' Does that sound right?
Cervantes's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
198 views

Differences between natio, populus, vulgus, cultus, and societas?

Is there a distinct differentiation between the words natio, populus, vulgus, cultus, and societas in classical Latin? I'm encountering conflicting definitions in various dictionaries.
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0 votes
1 answer
57 views

Can uppercase j be used to replace uppercase i letter on a monument inscription?

I have seen it repeatedly on two grave inscriptions. Both were called Ida but there was Jda on the grave inscription. They lived in the 19th and 20th centuries in the Central Europe. Is this a ...
Janko's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
217 views

What does "1" mean in vocabulary entries?

On p24 in Keller's Learn to Read Latin: ambulo, ambulire, ambulivi, amhulitum (1-intr.) walk amo, amare, amavi, amatus (1-tr.) love cogito (1-tr.) think; ponder do, dare, dedi, datus give, grant ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 1
6 votes
2 answers
508 views

What is the latin preposition for "Upon"?

as in the phrase "you want to Call upon my skill". There seem to be lots of prepositions that translate as "on" (which upon is a more formal and abstract form of), but I'm not sure ...
Jayber's user avatar
  • 61
5 votes
1 answer
153 views

Why do words starting with vu- all have alternative forms starting with vo-?

As far as I can see, every Latin word that starts with vu- has a collateral form starting with vo-. It's not many, but these at least: vulgus, vulnus, vulpes, vultur, vultus, and indeed vulva, where ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
125 views

Is etymology the best way or a good way to build Latin vocabulary? [closed]

I heard that the best way to improve English vocabulary is from the etymology's perspective. That refers to a lot of prefixes and roots that originated in Latin and Greek. Is etymology also the best ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
1 answer
69 views

Can 𝘱𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘪𝘢 mean "Calm, self-possessed waiting"?

Patientia come from passio (to suffer, bear); it means the ability to bear suffering. But can patientia in Latin also mean "Calm, self-possessed waiting" (OED's sense 1c)?
Geremia's user avatar
  • 3,700
6 votes
1 answer
471 views

Latin terms for cities and nations (in general)

I'm making a map of Italic tribes before Roman expansion started truly kicking off outside of Latium (c. 400-350 BC), and I've decided, for immersion's sake, to translate even the key, not just ...
MMastro1610's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
642 views

Is there a Latin parallel to the TLG website?

The TLG (=Thesaurus Linguae Graecae) is an incredibly helpful tool for understanding how an author uses a certain word. For example, if I wanted to learn how the word ἀνάπαυσις was used by Clement of ...
Sam Y.'s user avatar
  • 183
5 votes
2 answers
1k views

The Celtic word "al" in Latin?

I found a strange word while I read my Latin–Portuguese dictionary (Dicionário latino-português por F. R. Dos Santos Saraiva). The word is "al". The dictionary says that it's a Celtic word ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
63 views

Possibility of Vulgar Latin or Old Romanian origins of "Akoldo" and "Dir" in medieval Primary Chronicles of Kievan Rus

The names "Akoldo" (that's how he was called for the first time, and later he is mentioned as Askold) and "Dir" are mentioned as the first Varangian rulers of Kiev in the medieval ...
Damir's user avatar
  • 109
4 votes
1 answer
86 views

Help with translating "focused on humans" or "caring about people" from English to Latin?

I'm hoping to riff off of the US Military's "Sempre Fidelis/Sempre Fi", I want to show that we should always focus on/care about humans/people (instead of technology, or shareholders, or ...
Alex Kinman's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
52 views

Compounds in -ια and -σις

I greatly enjoy finding properly constructed (i.e. non hybrid grammatically ancient) equivalents to pseudo-classic neologisms. That is the background. I was wondering what the proper translation would ...
Ruh Muhaccer's user avatar
16 votes
1 answer
4k views

Both "fēmina" and "mulier" mean "woman": what's the difference?

The word fēmina is used with the meaning "woman": Of human beings, a female, woman (cf.: uxor, mulier, matrona; conjux, marita) (Lewis and Short) (Fēmina also means "female" when ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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9 votes
2 answers
311 views

What are the types of hair in latin?

What would be the adjectives to describe someone's hair? The only I know is "crispus" "curled" Could i just translate the adjectives in English into latin? Straight hair= capillus ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
55 views

generatio = childbirth or also education/raising of children?

Generatio means "a begetting", but does that include the whole process of conceiving, bearing, birthing, and educating the child?
Geremia's user avatar
  • 3,700
2 votes
2 answers
114 views

Was the Greek preposition "ἀνά" used in Latin?

A dictionary says that "ana tres uncias" was used by the Roman doctor Celsus. I googled this and didn't find anything. Was this Greek preposition used in Latin?
user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
342 views

I would like help with a translation for “remember your purpose” or something similar

After a particularly painful life shakeup, I want a tattoo that reminds me every day what I am supposed to do going forward. I would like it to be “remember your purpose” or “remember why” or ...
Paperpanda's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
331 views

Is there a latin helper word that can used with infinitives (and implies that the subsequent word may be an infinitive)?

As I'm working on vocabulary, I'm doing all I can on my flashcards to stay "in Latin" as much as possible (as opposed to English translations), and also to use as much "natural" ...
Josh's user avatar
  • 793
4 votes
1 answer
129 views

Translating command "Be of highest value!" to Latin for jewelery engraving

What is the most accurate translation for the command "Be of highest value!"? The meaning of the phrase is to behave as someone who brings out the best in others. As in, be the highest value ...
julian soro's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
175 views

Is there a zeroth Greek number noun below trias, dyas, monas?

I gave a list number-based nouns borrowed from Greek as an answer to a question on using numbers as nouns: monas, dyas, trias, tetras, pentas, hexas, heptas, octas, enneas, decas… One can conceivably ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
709 views

How do you say "chicken" in Latin?

I know which words to use for specific types of chicken: gallīna is a female (adult) chicken (hen). gallus is a male (adult) chicken (cock, rooster); it also is used for the male (cock) of other ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
128 views

How to translate "to turn on/out the light, the TV, in latin?

Since electricity is something new,how can we express this in latin? I guess the verbs accendo and solvo aren't exactly precise.
user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
666 views

How to say "patience" in latin in the modern sense of "virtue of waiting or being able to wait"?

Despite its similarity, the latin word patientia doesn't have the meaning of "patience" as the virtue or ability of waiting, but means more the virtue or ability of suffering r bearing ...
Juan G. C.'s user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
56 views

Why is the phrase negotiorum gestio instead of alienorum gestio?

In Law negotiorum gestio is a form of agency wherein a gestor acts on behalf and for the benefit of a principal without the latter's prior consent. For example, while you are traveling abroad, a ...
George Ntoulos's user avatar
12 votes
2 answers
3k views

Is *Moscovia* a latinists' invention?

Quoting this article on Grammatica Russica by Heinrich Wilhelm Ludolf: The Russian city of Novgorod (literally ‘new town’) becomes (in the ablative case) Novogorodio. Moscow is Moscovia, though it ...
Roger V.'s user avatar
  • 357
6 votes
3 answers
845 views

What does 'scrinaria' mean?

The following line occurs in an early Christian commentary on Genesis: Quid est enim aliud hodieque gens ipsa, nisi quaedam scrinaria Christianorum, bajulans legem et prophetas ad testimonium ...
Moshe Wise's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
189 views

Word for "once" as a logical precondition born of experience?

In English we sometimes use the word "once" to indicate a logical precondition born of experience. For example, "once you know you to ride a bike, you never forget" or "once ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 7,077
6 votes
1 answer
202 views

Tam multīs pugnīs

In this sentence of the story "Veturia", on p. 27 of the Fābulae Syrae: Magnus igitur Volscōrum numerus, Coriolānō duce, Rōmam oppugnavit; castrīs circā urbem positīs, tam multīs pugnīs ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
8 votes
3 answers
2k views

How do you describe someone as a shapeshifter in Latin?

Greco-Roman mythology is full of many examples of shape-changing. If you look only at Zeus/Jupiter alone, there are countless examples of him changing himself or changing others. Did the Romans have a ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,652
-2 votes
2 answers
141 views

Is it possible to search for words by definition on Wiktionary?

... Or are there better alternative to Wiktionary for looking up words by definition online.
TI. CVRIVM NAVISSIMVS's user avatar

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