Questions tagged [vocabulary]

This tag is for questions concerning the meaning and usage of individual words or a few words in conjunction with each other.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
12
votes
2answers
615 views

Is the usage of “id est” in Latin exactly like the usage of “i.e.” or “that is” in English?

There was a question a little while back on the English SE asking about the "plural form of i.e." (unfortunately, it got closed because the author didn't clarify what they meant). While I was trying ...
12
votes
2answers
1k views

How to use immo?

What does the word immo really mean and how can I use it? I read this and this dictionary entry, and I was left confused. Some of the uses I can understand, but some I cannot. Either I do not have ...
12
votes
2answers
1k views

Latin words for various types of diets (carnivore, vegetarian, vegan, etc.)?

Does Latin have words for the various types of diets, e.g., "vegetarian," "vegan," etc.? St. Thomas Aquinas, seemingly referring to what we today would call a "vegan," says (Summa Theologica II-II q. ...
11
votes
5answers
2k views

What is a best man in Latin?

A very recent question asks about a phrase involving a best man. What would be a good Latin translation of "best man", the groom's assistant in a wedding? I don't think vir optimus really means this. ...
11
votes
5answers
457 views

“Mind the gap!”

I am currently in London, and the Underground has been kind enough to repeat this warning numerous times: Please mind the gap between the train and the platform! Having heard the same phrase over ...
11
votes
4answers
783 views

How do I say that something will “probably” happen in Latin?

I was recently writing in Latin and had the misfortune of getting an English construction in my head that I had a difficult time fitting into a Latin thought pattern: I will probably be there soon. ...
11
votes
1answer
1k views

How do you say “notes” in Latin?

As the title says, how do you say notes in Latin? Originally I thought it would be nota, notae, but the online Perseus latin dictionary doesn't give the same sense of the word that I would like. ...
10
votes
2answers
1k views

What is “gullible” in Latin?

Did you know that Lewis and Short's dictionary doesn't contain the word "gullible"? That is an appropriate question for the first of April, but it turns out that I indeed found no trace of that word. ...
10
votes
2answers
388 views

What does a moderator do?

Classical Latin has the word moderator, which refers to someone who manages, rules, governs, directs, or moderates. I assume it does not refer to all kinds of managers, governors and such. I also ...
10
votes
1answer
317 views

What's the the Latin word for a government minister / secretary?

According to Wikipedia, the definition of a government minister is: A minister is a politician who holds significant public office in a national or regional government, making and implementing ...
10
votes
2answers
955 views

What is touché in Latin?

What would be a good translation of "touché" from English to Latin? Translating the French participle gives tactus, but I doubt that will convey the same idea. Is there an idiomatic Latin expression ...
9
votes
4answers
626 views

A good word for waiter or waitress

What would be a good Latin word for waiter or waitress in a restaurant? I would not call them servus; I find the word inappropriate when not referring to slaves. Servitor/servitrix would be more ...
8
votes
2answers
776 views

Is there a difference between septimana and hebdomas?

My dictionary gives two translations for "week": septimāna and hebdomas (gen. hebdomadis, feminine). Is there a difference between these two words? Are there contexts where only one of them is ...
8
votes
3answers
1k views

What is Latin (and Greek) for “medium”? (Greek)

The particular sense of medium I have in mind is the one used in Water is a medium of sound propagation. But propagation implies a multiplicity of places, or at least two of them, so that if ...
8
votes
1answer
481 views

How to distinguish “lecturer” and “reader” in Latin?

Universities in the UK have two distinct titles (among others): "lecturer" and "reader". A reader is more senior than a lecturer but both are below a professor. The US (rough?) equivalents are "...
8
votes
1answer
4k views

What is “philosophy” in Latin?

The Latin word I would use for to translate "philosophy" is philosophia. But this is a transliteration of a Greek word. Is there an originally Latin word for "philosophy"? The closest word I could ...
7
votes
1answer
393 views

Classical words for spelt

The Latin Wikipedia article about spelt mentions two ancient Latin names for spelt: spelta and scandala. I have found spelta used in more recent Latin, but nothing ancient. I have never seen scandala &...
7
votes
4answers
983 views

What is “time” in “first time”?

Is there a (preferably classical) Latin word for "time"? I mean "time" in the sense it has in "The first time is easiest." or "I can't remember the last time I was here.", not in the most common ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Latin Phrase for “It goes without saying”

The title of the question pretty much sums it up. I am looking for a Latin phrase for the English expression "It goes without saying." I am not sure if an analogous expression exists- although I would ...
5
votes
2answers
130 views

What creative pursuits can I follow using the Latin Language?

While we're stuck in quarantine I have plenty of time to create. Here's what I've tried doing so far: Helping answer easy questions on the Stack Exchange Translating songs into Latin/Writing songs in ...
5
votes
1answer
110 views

What to call a visa in Latin?

Is there an established Latin word for "visa", the kind of document you need to enter some countries? The English word seems to come from the past participle of the Latin verb videre, and so does the ...
5
votes
4answers
617 views

Idiom like “Fair enough!”

If someone disagrees with you and the argument makes you change your opinion, you might say "Fair enough!" in English. This seems to be essentially equivalent to "Oh, good point! I agree." Is there a ...
5
votes
1answer
163 views

Has “tribalis” ever been used in Latin?

I was recently looking up the etymologies of some obscure words related to the English word tribe (like the adjective tribual), and I came across a Wiktionary page that asserts that there is or was a ...
5
votes
1answer
49 views

About “joyful news”

I see there's a word for it: laetificum, laetificī. Then, if there's a Latin word for "joyful news," is there also a Latin word for "sad news"?
5
votes
2answers
145 views

What should we call the space beyond the world?

To the Romans, if I understand right, the word caelum "sky" incorporated everything above the earth: the atmosphere, the space beyond it, and even the thrones of the gods. But nowadays we divide ...
4
votes
2answers
215 views

“Malo” in Motto Maelstrom

The motto for Concordia University Saint Paul (MN) reads: "In litteris proficere volo, malo diligere Jesum." The CSP website, magazine (Spring 2009), and various internet sources offer these ...
4
votes
2answers
89 views

Putting “spread” on a bread in Latin

There are various kinds of spreads one can put on a bread, made from butter, vegetable oils, or other ingredients. What would be a good general word for these products for use in contemporary Latin? ...
3
votes
1answer
313 views

Is there a Latin word for a deadline?

Is there a Latin word for "deadline", a predefined point in time before which some assignment must be complete? I have heard the literal translation linea letalis, but there are also words like ...
3
votes
1answer
187 views

What is “site” in Latin?

I have been using the simple-minded translation situs (fourth declension) for "[web]site", and I have used it to refer to this site, among others. I'm not convinced this is a good choice, as I have no ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

What does 'i' mean in Latin

I was reading a story in Latin, and part of it said "i nunc, Mercuri". I don't know what i is in Latin. By the way, this line is said in dialogue. Is it a filler word similar to the "umm" or does it ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the Latin word for “will”, as in “willpower”?

The English noun "will" has a few different meanings. One is the choice or intention to do something, as in "willing" and "free will": Latin voluntās. Another meaning, though, is more like "resolve" ...
3
votes
1answer
93 views

How to translate “pesto”?

What would be a good Latin translation for the sauce pesto? I see a couple of possible routes, but it's not clear to me at all what I should call the sauce in a modern context: It seems to come from ...
2
votes
2answers
98 views

With which verb can I borrow from other languages?

If I want to describe that the word philosophia was borrowed from Greek to Latin, which Latin verb can I use for borrowing? Verbs like commodare and mutuari sound a little weird for this kind of loan. ...
2
votes
1answer
85 views

Is there a classical Latin verb for furnishing?

I recently read a booklet called "Wolmar Schildt — sata uudissanaa" which is built around a list of a hundred neologisms by Wolmar Schildt (1810–1893), one of the most active promoters of ...
13
votes
3answers
3k views

Does liberi only refer to free children?

This issue came up in an answer and comments to this earlier question about comparing liberi and filii, and I think it's important enough to be treated in a separate question. Also, the answer to this ...
11
votes
3answers
282 views

Can “alea” refer to a physical die, or only the game of dice?

(Inspired by this question.) The common English understanding of Caesar's famous "alea iacta est" is "the die is cast", using a metaphor from the throwing of a (physical) die. The ...
11
votes
2answers
3k views

Are there any subtle differences in the greetings, “Ave” and “Salve”?

When greeting someone, are there any subtle differences between "Ave" and "Salve"? Can both be used to greet and respond? E.g. Marcus: Ave, Cicero. Cicero: Salve, Marce. Or, vice ...
10
votes
2answers
2k views

Why is there no word meaning firearm in contemporary Latin?

I noticed that there is no word meaning firearm according to this site.Why is this? I've tried synonyms such as gun and pistol but none work. Has no one gotten around to making one?
10
votes
2answers
488 views

How to answer a question?

Respondere looks like a good verb for answering, but how can I say "to answer a question"? I failed to find an answer by looking at dictionaries. These options come to mind: quaestionem respondere in ...
10
votes
2answers
4k views

Is there a plural of Jesus in Latin?

The name Iesus has peculiar declension in Latin. The declension of this word in every source that I have seen only gives singular forms. However, I can imagine situations where a plural is needed: a ...
10
votes
2answers
488 views

Difference between filiī and liberī

I was reading Orberg's Lingua Latina per se Illustrata and I found the following sentences: Marcus et Quīntus sunt dūo filiī. [...] In familia Rõmāna tres līberī sunt. Now I deduce both words ...
10
votes
3answers
1k views

Do any Latin animal names start with Q?

Ideally I'm looking for common or barnyard animals attested in the Classical period, but Late Latin or early Medieval Latin that has a good case of going back to the Classical period would suffice. I ...
9
votes
1answer
74 views

How can I say something is working (as in, not broken)?

For example, this sentence: My furnace works would be one of Furnus meus [some verb] Furnus meus [some adjective] est (i.e. "my furnace is working") What could I put in for either the verb ...
9
votes
1answer
201 views

Usage of adjective solus

I'm trying to translate the sentence "The whole state was thanking this man's brother alone." (that is, the brother the only one being thanked) My try is: Tota civitas fratri huius soli gratias agebat....
8
votes
3answers
3k views

What is the meaning and use of the word 'Duco'?

I want to confirm my understanding of the word duco. According to Wiktionary, it is a third conjugation, irregular short imperative. The examples are: I lead, guide I draw, pull I think, consider I ...
8
votes
1answer
434 views

Why “idolatria” instead of “idololatria”?

Although the idea of idolatry has been present for a long time, I believe St. Paul is the first to use the term εἰδωλολατρία, e.g. Gal 5:20. (Corrections welcome!) Two surprises come when we look at ...
8
votes
2answers
371 views

DVCITIS, DUCITIS, DŪCITIS

Are all three of these valid spellings and have I listed them in the chronological order they would have been used? DVCITIS DUCITIS DŪCITIS Would the C have been pronounced with a hard 'K', or a 'CH'...
8
votes
2answers
643 views

What's the best translation of “vindice” in Met. 1.89?

I was translating this verse, and although I came up with several candidates for translating vindice, I am still not sure about the intended meaning. Aurea prima sata est aetas, quae vindice nullo, ...
8
votes
1answer
122 views

Does “plurimi” imply “vast majority” in Augustine's Enchiridion?

In Augustine's Enchiridion, §112, he writes: Frustra itaque nonnulli, immo quam plurimi, aeternam damnatorum poenam et cruciatus sine intermissione perpetuos humano miserantur affectu, atque ita ...
8
votes
1answer
100 views

About Aristotelian ἐπιχαιρεκακία

In this passage from Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle uses the word ἐπιχαιρεκακία to mean: joy over one's neighbour's misfortune My question is, Does ἐπιχαιρεκακία have a Latin counterpart in either ...