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Questions tagged [vocabulary]

This tag is for questions concerning the meaning and usage of individual words or a few words in conjunction with each other.

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Quidquid vs quæcumque

Both quidquid and quæcumque are ways of translating English whatever or all things that [sth.], but is there any difference in meaning in that specific context? I have a vague notion, not based in ...
Rafael's user avatar
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7 votes
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67 views

16th century vocabulary - harpsichord

In a 16th century text about musical tuning by Benedetti, the author provides this diagram, which he uses to describe his process of tuning the notes on a harpsichord: In the text, he begins his ...
Thomas Nicholson's user avatar
6 votes
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99 views

"Friendless" in Latin?

I am looking for a general strategy for translating adjectives like "friendless" into Latin. My interest is general, but for concreteness I will discuss my thoughts in light of this example. ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
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189 views

How does Homer say "finger" and "leg?"

The English-Greek dictionary by Woodhouse translates finger as "δάκτυλος." However, the Homeric dictionary by Cunliffe doesn't have this word, and searching in the text of Homer doesn't seem to turn ...
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Why is the phrase negotiorum gestio instead of alienorum gestio?

In Law negotiorum gestio is a form of agency wherein a gestor acts on behalf and for the benefit of a principal without the latter's prior consent. For example, while you are traveling abroad, a ...
George Ntoulos's user avatar
5 votes
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116 views

Classical Translation for "aura, vibrations, feeling"

I have struggled in finding an adequate translation for the above mentioned words, that designate the subtle ambiance that something is thought to emit or convey. Like "she gives me negative ...
Ruh Muhaccer's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
74 views

What are some loanwords in Latin where there is no native synonym?

My question about a Latin word for "tattoo" prompted some surprise in me that the Romans didn't borrow a word for tattoo. One would think that some group of people they interacted with who ...
Adam's user avatar
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5 votes
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Latin "Basic" Colors and Shades

Salvete Omnes, While I am working on a Minecraft resource pack that changes the Latin, which hopefully fixes some rough spots in it, I came back to a problem which strikes me occasionally with colors ...
NanoEta's user avatar
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5 votes
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109 views

Well, well, well

How to say this expression in Latin!? Expressing surprise: Well, well, well! It is here (when smth lost and found)! Expressing sarcasm: Well, well, well... And what now!? Expressing begining: Well, ...
TrmIntrs2's user avatar
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5 votes
0 answers
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Old illustrated books showing daily life in ancient Greece or Rome

When I was learning French, I found it very helpful to work on my vocabulary using a picture book called First Thousand Words in French. For example, it would have something like a full-page picture ...
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5 votes
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Does Latin offer a single word referring back to the preceding *two* names mentioned?

Background. The following is correct standard English: (0) He read the poems of Catullus, Juvenal, Horace, and Virgil. He intentionally memorized only poems of the latter two. The following uses ...
guest's user avatar
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1 answer
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Translation for "adventure"

One of the meanings of the word adventure is "exciting or remarkable experience", e.g. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland They were looking for adventure. Working with children can be a ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
134 views

Translate phrase from Stephen King novel

In Stephen King's novel Song of Susannah, aka Dark Tower book 6, he has the phrase: In the Kingdom of Ago, the clocks tick... but their hands never move. I am translating this to Latin but find some ...
Adam's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
29 views

How to say "relation" (as in diplomatic relation between parties)

How to term the connection between two entitles whether between countries or between individuals. How to say something like: "The relation between the brothers were once tense, but now they are ...
d_e's user avatar
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4 votes
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Is there an antonymous phrase to dies mali?

"dismal" in English was originated from Latin dies mali ‘evil days’. Is there an antonymous phrase to dies mali? If yes, is there an English word originated from that?
Tim's user avatar
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116 views

Why is the name of Athens (Athenae) plural?

The Latin word for Athens, Athenae, is plural. Why is this?
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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Is postid a derived form or an archaic form of post?

I pondered this since reading some Plautus. It seems similar to postea (post ea), just being in singular (so post id?), or perhaps it is the obsolete earlier form of post itself. Just curious if there ...
VivatLinguaLatina's user avatar
4 votes
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58 views

What is the best Latin counterpart for 'reach' or 'contact'?

In English you can use the verbs "reach" or "contact" to mean being in contact with someone without specifying the method. When you don't want to specify whether you are writing a ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
72 views

Can δῖος legitimately be translated as "boundless?"

Homer uses the set phrases ἅλα δῖαν and ἠῶ δῖαν to describe the sea and the dawn. Some 19th century commentators and translators (Buckley) think δῖαν should be read here as "boundless." The ...
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4 votes
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Names for digits or numbers

How would you say "I write zeroes and ones" or "I need a fiver" or "the number seven" in Latin? There are a couple of cases where in some languages one uses instead of a ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
80 views

Passage from Odington

I am looking at a short passage from Odington's treaty on music, and am unsure about the last bit, particularly the meaning of "abiectus" in this context. I admit to having limited skill reading Latin-...
Thomas Nicholson's user avatar
4 votes
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298 views

Are there Classical Latin words whose meanings are unknown to us?

Are there any attested Classical Latin words whose meanings are unknown to us? Given the intensive study of the Classical Latin corpus and the many methods of getting at the meanings of words (...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
230 views

How did the Greek word "oikonomia" get the meaning of "thrift"?

Some dictionaries seem to include the word "thrift" at the end of the definition for oikonomia. I found some good examples on the Online Etymology Dictionary and on Merriam-Webster: Greek ...
user3789797's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
458 views

Seeking simple Latin translation for motto "fire, flow, transcendence"

I am in a community of flow artists and fire performers. I'm putting together a "coat of arms" of sorts for this community, and would like to include a motto in Latin. The motto in English would be ...
Matt Storer's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
66 views

meaning of "status" and "condiciones"

I'm reading Olaus Magnus's 1550 Historia de gentibus septentrionalibus, earumque diversis statibus, condicionibus, moribus, ritibus, superstitionibus, disciplinis, exercitiis, regimine, victu, bellis, ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
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4 votes
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53 views

Comparing citizens and subjects

There is a difference between a citizen and a subject. Roughly, a citizen holds some power in the state (through voting or otherwise), whereas a subject is subordinate to their leader and has no say. (...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
198 views

Differences between natio, populus, vulgus, cultus, and societas?

Is there a distinct differentiation between the words natio, populus, vulgus, cultus, and societas in classical Latin? I'm encountering conflicting definitions in various dictionaries.
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3 votes
0 answers
58 views

Clean the house

A friend of mine put a reminder to clean his house before going out, in the inner-facing side of the front door. As a humorous note, he wrote it in Latin, attached to a well-known quote: Memento mori....
Rafael's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
101 views

Why is computatorium considered to be a better word than computatrum? (For the English word "computer")

I was watching a Luke Ranieri video in which he mentioned that computatrum isn't a very good word for computer, and that computatorium is much better, and that people should stop using computatrum. ...
Nomad1004's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
63 views

On the function of dignus

Usually, when we say Marcus dignus amictiā we mean that Marcus is entitled to or worthy of friendship. Keeping the direction but increasing volume we can say "Marcus (On account of his character) ...
d_e's user avatar
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3 votes
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709 views

How do you say "chicken" in Latin?

I know which words to use for specific types of chicken: gallīna is a female (adult) chicken (hen). gallus is a male (adult) chicken (cock, rooster); it also is used for the male (cock) of other ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
60 views

Reading of "licet" in the following sentence

The following sentence is from a 5th-century book [12] Rursus terra accepto solis lumine clarescit tantummodo, non relucet, luna speculi instar lumen quo illustratur emittit, quia illa aeris et aquae,...
Abhishek Yadav's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
73 views

On words with non-Classical meanings in LLPSI

I found Lingua Latina per se Illustrata(LLPSI) use the word kalendārium for calendar (as in Chap. 13, and the official Latin-English wordbook), but in both dictionaries L&S and OLD there is just ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
99 views

What are the meanings of servus and minister in ecclesiatical latin?

Reading the answers to another question I thought about the meaning of servus and minister in christian/ecclesiastical latin. It seems to me that in classical latin servus related clearly to the legal ...
K-HB's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
78 views

What is a "camarilla" in Latin?

The Spanish word camarilla means a group of conspirators meeting in secret to manipulate the political leadership. It's been borrowed into English, as well as quite a few other Romance languages, ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
65 views

προσώπατα versus πρόσωπα, προσώπασι versus προσώποις in Homer

I'm working on learning Homeric vocabulary, and for this purpose I've written a script using CLTK to search for forms of a particular word through the Iliad and Odyssey. The idea is that I don't want ...
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3 votes
0 answers
187 views

Discere and Studere

When "discere" can be synonymous with "studere"? I read an old book saying that: "discere" and "studere" aren't usually synonymous, but they can be in some particular contexts. I'd like to know in ...
Quidam's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
814 views

What is the best Latin word for "career"?

What would be the best Latin word(s) for "career", to be used together with a specification such as "academic", "military", or "industrial"? The Roman phrase cursus honorum might refer too ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
89 views

What is "cold war"?

How should I translate "cold war" in Latin? I can see two ways to approach this, using a classical phrase for a similar hostile political situation, or finding a suitable adjective for "cold" to go ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
45 views

Can we find a quotation from an author containing the word μεγαρτός?

I ran into this this morning, and had an exchange in comments with the other answerer (after answering myself). The word μεγαρτός, I'm fairly certain, means "envied", being the -τος verbal adjective ...
MickG's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
33 views

Are there meaningful differences in meaning and usability between 'calculare' and 'computare'?

Is there any meaningful difference, from the point of view of classical philology (not from the point of view of contemporary usages and dictionaries which more or less seem to consider them synonyms) ...
guest's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
77 views

Differences between φρονεω and νοεω

What is the difference between the meaning of these two words? How is it different when I φρονεω vs when I νοεω? So far as I understand it, νοεω is from the νους or καρδια, and φρονεω is from the φρην....
Phillip's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
50 views

Are there different words for an excerpt and its location in Latin?

In Latin, locus can be the passage of a text (e.g. Cicero says he is going to translate a passage in one of his speeches and uses locus if I remember correctly) but it can also be the location of the ...
user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
71 views

How would you translate "Mentalist" into Latin?

How would mentalist be translated into Latin? There is some debate about what constitutes mentalism, but to me I would summarize as the use of psychology, cold reading, skilled intuition, and careful ...
Adam's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
39 views

What would be the Latin equivalent of the English noun, "reflex"?

The English word "reflex" comes from the late Latin word reflexus, to bend back, turn away. Is there a Latin noun equivalent to reflex in the modern sense? Classical is preferred, but any ...
Adam's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
65 views

Duumvir vs Duovir

A Duumvir, or Duovir, is one member of a two-man council. Why are there two spellings, what does the nuance imply, and which one is correct under which circumstance?
user65023's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
165 views

Does *meditari* mean "measure"?

Does meditari have a meaning like "measure"? Using Google (I don't know which dictionary it's quoting), I see ... However I don't think I'm seeing that in a Latin dictionary, e.g. Lewis and Short or ...
ChrisW's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
84 views

Translation of Odyssey Book I lines 52–54

I wasn't entirely happy with any of the translations I found online, so I was forced to attempt my own: "...crafty Atlas, who knows the full depths of the sea, and holds, himself, the towering ...
DukeZhou's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
87 views

Has linguistic agglutination played any provable role in Ancient Greek's conduciveness to complex philosophical ideas and concepts?

My last question received a comment from Joonas Ilmavirta that just made me think about a fantastical, if in any way true, possibility: I would add that Greek tends to favor compound words far more ...
ΥΣΕΡ26328's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
220 views

Determining the etymology of words in Latin

I am interested in the etymology of words in Latin. Is there a resource available that could help me determine if a word is specifically from Old, New or Vulgar Latin etc. according to a time it is ...
aitía's user avatar
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