Questions tagged [vocabulary]

This tag is for questions concerning the meaning and usage of individual words or a few words in conjunction with each other.

44 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
9
votes
1answer
278 views

The opposing meanings of the word donec?

I saw that "donec" might mean: "as long as", but it also can mean "till". In a sense those are opposing meanings. let's consider this example: I'm happy as long as there is daylight outside I'm ...
7
votes
0answers
254 views

Size of Latin vocabulary by period

What is the size of attested (or accepted) Latin vocabulary by period (Old, Classical, Late etc.)? I am specifically interested in the Classical period, but I have added the other ones to the ...
6
votes
0answers
93 views

How does Homer say “finger” and “leg?”

The English-Greek dictionary by Woodhouse translates finger as "δάκτυλος." However, the Homeric dictionary by Cunliffe doesn't have this word, and searching in the text of Homer doesn't seem to turn ...
5
votes
0answers
71 views

Well, well, well

How to say this expression in Latin!? Expressing surprise: Well, well, well! It is here (when smth lost and found)! Expressing sarcasm: Well, well, well... And what now!? Expressing begining: Well, ...
5
votes
0answers
48 views

Old illustrated books showing daily life in ancient Greece or Rome

When I was learning French, I found it very helpful to work on my vocabulary using a picture book called First Thousand Words in French. For example, it would have something like a full-page picture ...
5
votes
0answers
50 views

Is *rīcus attested?

The word for "rich" in most Romance languages looks something like, well, "rich". It declines like a first/second declension adjective, and seems to go back to Germanic *rīkijaz (possibly through ...
5
votes
0answers
157 views

How do you call your aunt's or uncle's spouse?

In Latin, a paternal aunt is an 'amita', a paternal uncle is a 'patruus', a maternal aunt is a 'matertera' and a maternal uncle is an 'avunculus'. However, how do you call each of these people's ...
5
votes
0answers
47 views

damnatio memoriae

The Wikipedia article on the subject notes that the term damnatio memoriae, referring to the relegation of a person's name to oblivion, as if they never existed, is a neo-Latin expression first ...
5
votes
0answers
74 views

Does Latin offer a single word referring back to the preceding *two* names mentioned?

Background. The following is correct standard English: (0) He read the poems of Catullus, Juvenal, Horace, and Virgil. He intentionally memorized only poems of the latter two. The following uses ...
5
votes
0answers
151 views

“Purissimum penem” in Suetonius's Life of Horace

Suetonius, in his Vita Horati, reports that the emperor Augustus jokingly referred to Horace as a purissimus penis: Praeterea saepe eum inter alios iocos purissimum penem et homuncionem ...
4
votes
0answers
61 views

Passage from Odington

I am looking at a short passage from Odington's treaty on music, and am unsure about the last bit, particularly the meaning of "abiectus" in this context. I admit to having limited skill reading Latin-...
4
votes
0answers
55 views

Opposing meanings of the suffix -gena

I recently came across the word "deigena" while reading c. 2, lectio 4 of Aquinas's Commentary on the Divine Names of [Pseudo-]Dionysius. This led me to discover what seems to be a productive suffix ...
4
votes
1answer
67 views

Proper way to say “Traveler's Writ/Licence/Certificate”

I am looking for more or less the 'proper' (or any good approximation) way to translate a "Traveler's Writ," as in a certificate or license given to a traveler that allows him legal access to an area. ...
4
votes
0answers
134 views

Are there Classical Latin words whose meanings are unknown to us?

Are there any attested Classical Latin words whose meanings are unknown to us? Given the intensive study of the Classical Latin corpus and the many methods of getting at the meanings of words (...
4
votes
0answers
212 views

Seeking simple Latin translation for motto “fire, flow, transcendence”

I am in a community of flow artists and fire performers. I'm putting together a "coat of arms" of sorts for this community, and would like to include a motto in Latin. The motto in English would be ...
4
votes
0answers
718 views

How to translate “sexy”?

How would one translate “sexy” into Latin? In particular, I’m looking for a word or phrase that has a similar “slangy” feel to the English version. I’ve considered a few possibilities: Catullus 10 ...
4
votes
0answers
50 views

Comparing citizens and subjects

There is a difference between a citizen and a subject. Roughly, a citizen holds some power in the state (through voting or otherwise), whereas a subject is subordinate to their leader and has no say. (...
4
votes
0answers
92 views

Is Pluto a planet(a)?

Judging by Lewis and Short (and other sources), planeta means a wandering star and was borrowed from Greek. Apparently the word is post-classical, and the classical expression is stellae errantes/...
4
votes
0answers
81 views

Translating “star” (actor, musician, or similar)

What would be a good Latin translation of a "star", a famous actor, musician or other such person? I am looking for a good translation for modern use, but of course an attested ancient choice of words ...
3
votes
0answers
28 views

What are the meanings of servus and minister in ecclesiatical latin?

Reading the answers to another question I thought about the meaning of servus and minister in christian/ecclesiastical latin. It seems to me that in classical latin servus related clearly to the legal ...
3
votes
0answers
61 views

What is a “camarilla” in Latin?

The Spanish word camarilla means a group of conspirators meeting in secret to manipulate the political leadership. It's been borrowed into English, as well as quite a few other Romance languages, ...
3
votes
0answers
38 views

προσώπατα versus πρόσωπα, προσώπασι versus προσώποις in Homer

I'm working on learning Homeric vocabulary, and for this purpose I've written a script using CLTK to search for forms of a particular word through the Iliad and Odyssey. The idea is that I don't want ...
3
votes
0answers
72 views

Gen 1:28 only animals that move or all living beings?

The book of Genesis, 1:28 reads: Crescite et multiplicamini et replete terram et subicite eam et dominamini piscibus maris et volatilibus caeli et universis animantibus, quae moventur super terram ...
3
votes
0answers
80 views

How would you translate γέγονεν in John 1:15?

I'm translating the 15th verse of John 1, and I'm curious to know the nuances of translating the phrase ὁ ὀπίσω μου ἐρχόμενος ἔμπροσθέν μου γέγονεν, and especially the word γέγονεν. Below is the NA28 ...
3
votes
0answers
116 views

Does *meditari* mean “measure”?

Does meditari have a meaning like "measure"? Using Google (I don't know which dictionary it's quoting), I see ... However I don't think I'm seeing that in a Latin dictionary, e.g. Lewis and Short or ...
3
votes
0answers
116 views

How the Greek word “oikonomia” got meaning of “thrift”?

Some dictionaries seems to include the word "thrift" at the end of definition for oikonomia (good examples here and here): Greek oikonomia "household management, thrift. I would like to know the ...
3
votes
0answers
58 views

meaning of “status” and “condiciones”

I'm reading Olaus Magnus's 1550 Historia de gentibus septentrionalibus, earumque diversis statibus, condicionibus, moribus, ritibus, superstitionibus, disciplinis, exercitiis, regimine, victu, bellis, ...
3
votes
0answers
506 views

What is the best Latin word for “career”?

What would be the best Latin word(s) for "career", to be used together with a specification such as "academic", "military", or "industrial"? The Roman phrase cursus honorum might refer too ...
3
votes
0answers
43 views

Can we find a quotation from an author containing the word μεγαρτός?

I ran into this this morning, and had an exchange in comments with the other answerer (after answering myself). The word μεγαρτός, I'm fairly certain, means "envied", being the -τος verbal adjective ...
3
votes
0answers
24 views

Are there meaningful differences in meaning and usability between 'calculare' and 'computare'?

Is there any meaningful difference, from the point of view of classical philology (not from the point of view of contemporary usages and dictionaries which more or less seem to consider them synonyms) ...
2
votes
0answers
43 views

Duumvir vs Duovir

A Duumvir, or Duovir, is one member of a two-man council. Why are there two spellings, what does the nuance imply, and which one is correct under which circumstance?
2
votes
0answers
67 views

Discere and Studere

When "discere" can be synonymous with "studere"? I read an old book saying that: "discere" and "studere" aren't usually synonymous, but they can be in some particular contexts. I'd like to know in ...
2
votes
0answers
240 views

What is “sense of humour” in Latin?

What would be a good classical Latin translation of "sense of humour"? I can find words for "humour", but I am not sure how to go about "sense of". Would one of the humour words be adequate on its own ...
2
votes
0answers
397 views

Latin translation of the word “software”?

Would it be correct to translate software (soft-ware) as "mollis mercimonium" ?
2
votes
0answers
66 views

What is “cold war”?

How should I translate "cold war" in Latin? I can see two ways to approach this, using a classical phrase for a similar hostile political situation, or finding a suitable adjective for "cold" to go ...
2
votes
0answers
56 views

Translation of Odyssey Book I lines 52–54

I wasn't entirely happy with any of the translations I found online, so I was forced to attempt my own: "...crafty Atlas, who knows the full depths of the sea, and holds, himself, the towering ...
2
votes
0answers
60 views

Has linguistic agglutination played any provable role in Ancient Greek's conduciveness to complex philosophical ideas and concepts?

My last question received a comment from Joonas Ilmavirta that just made me think about a fantastical, if in any way true, possibility: I would add that Greek tends to favor compound words far more ...
1
vote
1answer
300 views

Mysterious word for “expert” in an Italian anthology's version of Sappho LP 21

In this Italian anthology, LP 21 l. 2 (the first line where the papyrus has letters) is read as containing επαβολησ (and perhaps vestigia around it). The first word in the translation is "esperta", ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Untraceable word in a combination of LP fragments

LP 68(b) and 69 have been combined into a single text by the impression that they were «ex eadem parte papyri» and by the one letter split between the two. The resulting text, found in 6.A.iv here, ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

Natural or unflavoured products

There are a number of different flavours of, say, yogurts, and one of them is plain, without any added flavours besides what is needed to make the yogurt. In English this flavour seems to be often ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

How to translate “associative movement”

How could we translate "associative movement" in Latin? I know "association" is usually "consociatio", but what about the adjective? "Associative movement" means (more or less) the fact that people ...
1
vote
0answers
100 views

What is the relation between -men and -mentum?

When answering this question about incrementum, I recalled the similarity of the suffixes -mentum and -men. If the linked Wiktionary pages are to be trusted, they are etymologically related, both ...
1
vote
0answers
280 views

List of false friends

Is there a short list of the most common false friends for translating Latin into English?
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Looking for Personal Lexicon / Dictionary Program

I'm trying to find a personal lexicon/dictionary/language study/flash card program - preferably one that makes allowances (ie has a place to enter) all of the forms of a word (noun declensions, verb ...