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Questions tagged [vocabulary]

This tag is for questions concerning the meaning and usage of individual words or a few words in conjunction with each other.

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How were those shrine niches originally called?

A recent excavation in Pompeii revealed a rather rare blue (caeruleum?) shrine. In this there are 3 niches of red color. How those are called in Latin? (Image taken from here - pompeiisites.org)
d_e's user avatar
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1 vote
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63 views

What are the meaning and function of -ne in superne and pone?

What are the meaning and function of -ne in superne and pone? Oxford Latin Dictionary seems to say that the senses of -ne is related to making questions, and it is hard for me to relate its senses ...
Tim's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
106 views

What is the full word of clitic -ce?

Oxford Latin Dictionary says -ce particle. Deictic particle, usu. enclitic (cf, Osc. iuc, nom. sg, f. = ea); added to demonstratives and in classical L, reduced to -c (hic, iliic; hinc, ...
Tim's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
58 views

Clean the house

A friend of mine put a reminder to clean his house before going out, in the inner-facing side of the front door. As a humorous note, he wrote it in Latin, attached to a well-known quote: Memento mori....
Rafael's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
134 views

Translate phrase from Stephen King novel

In Stephen King's novel Song of Susannah, aka Dark Tower book 6, he has the phrase: In the Kingdom of Ago, the clocks tick... but their hands never move. I am translating this to Latin but find some ...
Adam's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
71 views

ūro vs adūro in Ritchie's Fabulae faciles (Hercules, §22)

I read in Ritchie's Fabulae faciles ([Hercules, §22], macrons are mine): (Hercules is about to attack the hydra) Mox mōnstrum inuēnit, et quamquam rēs erat magnī perīculī, collum ēius sinistrā ...
suizokukan's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
255 views

Examples where a derived noun and a passive form in '-or' are unrelated

It recently occurred to me that rigor is both a noun ("stiffness") and a verb form ("I am moistened"). Are there other similar examples of pairs in Latin with a noun and a passive ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
432 views

Having a hard time finding classical examples of eo (the verb)

I am having a hard time finding examples of the word eo (to go). For example, I searched Perseus for both it and isse in multiple plays of Plautus like Pseudolus, Menaechmi, Miles Gloriosus, and a lot ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
289 views

Can facio be used to express visiting someone?

In Duolingo's Latin course, they have examples like the following: Cliens patronum facit. The answer they expect you to choose is, "the client visits the patron". Can facio be used to mean ...
Adam's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
77 views

Differences between φρονεω and νοεω

What is the difference between the meaning of these two words? How is it different when I φρονεω vs when I νοεω? So far as I understand it, νοεω is from the νους or καρδια, and φρονεω is from the φρην....
Phillip's user avatar
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3 votes
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Why is computatorium considered to be a better word than computatrum? (For the English word "computer")

I was watching a Luke Ranieri video in which he mentioned that computatrum isn't a very good word for computer, and that computatorium is much better, and that people should stop using computatrum. ...
Nomad1004's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
114 views

Introduction in Latin

I want to find the proper correlative/translation for the phrase "introduce yourself" in latin. Can you think of the phrase? Thanks in advance.
Dachi Pachulia's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
328 views

Reading latin texts as a beginner

I am a beginner in Latin. I don't have a lot of vocabulary. I am trying to read a book and learning the basics at the same time. With this method, I except to have a greater vocabulary. But the ...
mle's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
200 views

Incomplete word

This is in an astronomy book from 1672. I would need help please identifying the word that ends the second line and begins the third. There seems to be a misprint and a word missing its beginning but ...
Pierre Paquette's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
63 views

On the function of dignus

Usually, when we say Marcus dignus amictiā we mean that Marcus is entitled to or worthy of friendship. Keeping the direction but increasing volume we can say "Marcus (On account of his character) ...
d_e's user avatar
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6 votes
3 answers
2k views

"Ghost", as in the noun

I would like to know how to say "Ghost" properly, as in I am a ghost. All I have been able to find is "Mares";"Marium";"Spectare"...etc. I would prefer if ...
PunKn303's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
422 views

What does POSSVit mean in this latin inscription that appears in a novel?

What does POSSVit mean in this latin inscription that appears in a novel? hi. does anyone know in machen's "great god pan" the latin inscription that is supposed to appear on a Roman ...
JTR777's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
174 views

What's the Difference Between αχρι and μεχρι?

This is a question about ancient Greek language. I thought this would be the best place to post the question as there are other Greek questions here and stack-exchange doesn't have a Greek forum. If ...
Phillip's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
29 views

How to say "relation" (as in diplomatic relation between parties)

How to term the connection between two entitles whether between countries or between individuals. How to say something like: "The relation between the brothers were once tense, but now they are ...
d_e's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
79 views

Greek/Latin lexical or compositorial correspondences

I'm always intrigued by lexical correspondences and kinships and the underlying etymology (where it is not completely obvious, of course), such as between English town and German Zaun, English war and ...
Lumi's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
731 views

Is there any difference between "Benedicat tibi" and "Benedicat te"? Which is the correct translation for "Bless you"?

I find that the Vulgate shows "benedicat tibi Dominus" and I read online that there are posts saying "Benedicat te" as well. I have not found that "benedico" has to go ...
Valentine Vincent's user avatar
6 votes
0 answers
99 views

"Friendless" in Latin?

I am looking for a general strategy for translating adjectives like "friendless" into Latin. My interest is general, but for concreteness I will discuss my thoughts in light of this example. ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
934 views

What is the meaning of audio?

Sometimes people use the term "hearing Mass". For example, it is used in the Six Precepts of the Church where it is a translation of the Latin "Missam audire": To hear Mass on ...
harry jansson's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
37 views

How would I say something along the lines of "no kicks no glory", "no kickstart no glory"

The intention is to point out that there is no glory in starting your motorcycle with electricity. Starting up your engine by kicking your kickstart is the one true and pure way. I tried to figure it ...
Max Ohert's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
89 views

Is there an antonymous phrase to dies mali?

"dismal" in English was originated from Latin dies mali ‘evil days’. Is there an antonymous phrase to dies mali? If yes, is there an English word originated from that?
Tim's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
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How to interpret "tertio" in the context of dates?

I often see dates expressed as, for example, tertio idus maias where idus is the feminine accusative plural and maias is the adjective agreeing with idus relating to the month of May. So, the question ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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10 votes
3 answers
258 views

Questions on reading the prologue of Aesopus Latinus via LLPSI

Duplex libelli dos est: quod risum movet  et quod prudenti vitam consilio monet. Calumniari si quis autem voluerit  quod arbores loquantur, non tantum ferae, ... (Line 3~6) Dos is explained as a ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
116 views

Why is the name of Athens (Athenae) plural?

The Latin word for Athens, Athenae, is plural. Why is this?
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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12 votes
2 answers
3k views

Why is the Latin word for plum so close to the name of Damascus?

The Latin word for plum is damascena, and the capital of Syria is Damascus. Are these names related? Why is Latin word for plum so close to the name of Syrian capital? Did Damascus have good plums in ...
Snack Exchange's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
728 views

What does "nosse" mean?

What does nosse mean? I cannot find it in Lewis & Short. For example: Quam ob rem, quod quaesivit ex me P. Apuleius, homo et multis officiis mihi et summa familiaritate coniunctus et vobis ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
198 views

How would you properly translate "of the Gods" into Latin?

I am trying to translate the phrase "of the gods" into Latin. Google translate says it would be deorum, however I am skeptical of the accuracy of Google translate, other sources say it is ...
Devon Grant's user avatar
8 votes
0 answers
229 views

Quidquid vs quæcumque

Both quidquid and quæcumque are ways of translating English whatever or all things that [sth.], but is there any difference in meaning in that specific context? I have a vague notion, not based in ...
Rafael's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
90 views

The feeling of home

I believe there is an idiom in English that says: It feels like home Or something [about it] felt [somehow] like home This means when you’re at a place where you feel comfortable and as if it was ...
Samuelis Grisseldis's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
862 views

How can I express "to make a wish"?

I want a phrase for "to make a wish" instead of a single verb "to wish", in order to make the line of lyrics long enough for the music. The noun for "wish" may be optatum,...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
138 views

Was the Latin verb "stimulare" ("to stimulate", from the noun "stimulus" meaning "sting") attested in the meaning "to sting (of an insect)"?

The Latin verb "stimulare" (to urge, to stimulate) comes from the noun "stimulus" (sting of a bee or a similar animal). Was it ever attested in the meaning "to sting (of a bee)...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
1k views

Does "virtus" apply to women?

Virtus, literally "manlihood", is the origin of English virtue and is often so translated. As far as I know, virtus mainly refers to "courage", "strength" and other "...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
238 views

What is the difference between Obsculta and Exaudi?

In the Rule of St Benedict we find: Obsculta, o fili, præcepta magistri, https://www.thelatinlibrary.com/benedict.html We also have this in some prayers: Exaudī nos Domine sancte, Pater omnipotens, ...
harry jansson's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
270 views

Would a cat be considered a "bestia"?

I am trying to understand what the word "bestia" meant. Did it have the same connotations as the English word "beast" and the Croatian word "zvijer"? Would somebody who ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
3k views

What does "Potochoterophii Fohsiensis" possibly mean in a Latin cryptogram from "Cocker's Decimal Arithmetic" textbook?

I was reading an old math textbook, Cocker's Decimal Arithmetic, and came across this cryptogram: The question I have is about the beginning of the text: Anixo guo Anamfiggino Jorammi Lehkeg ...
Charles Hoffmann's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
272 views

when to use *tria* vs. *tres* and why?

"Quot liberi in familia sunt? ____[III] liberi." "Vir, puer, puella ____[III] vocabula sunt." "Rhenus et Danuvius et Tiberis ____[III] fluvii sunt." #when would I use ...
hey's user avatar
  • 21
4 votes
1 answer
149 views

Learning *About* Something in Latin

As I understand it, the usual verb for learning in Latin is discō. Looking at Lewis & Short on Perseus [link] it seems like this is attested with an accusative (in the sense "to learn NOUN&...
Tristan's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
56 views

How would you translate "purposefulness"?

Purposefulness or goal-orientedness. I've seen such translations as "propositum" or "voluntas", but they seem to refer to "purpose", not to the quality of sticking to a ...
Roman Rudenko's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
179 views

Auto-antonyms in Latin

It seems there are no questions on this site about it because I can't search out. An auto-antonym (also called contronym, antagonym, Janus word, etc.) is a word whose antonym can be itself. For ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
198 views

Can 'superiore' mean 'previous years' (plural)?

Under the year 1558, George Buchanan writes (Rerum Scoticarum Historia, 1582): Hoc anno et superiore etiam, caussa religionis quodam modo iacuisse videbatur, quod morte... In the standard English ...
user558840's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
235 views

encrypt / to hide a message in Latin

What was the verb(s) the Romans used when the hide/encrypt a message in another text (and also the antonym "to decipher")? After consulting Döderlein's Hand-book of Latin Synonymes (Celare), ...
d_e's user avatar
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6 votes
3 answers
1k views

How to translate "It is easy to remember"?

"remember" here means "to call to mind", and I considered "facilis + supine" construction, but verbs for this meaning (memini, reminiscor, recordor) are all too special ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
100 views

"Receive blow in the face with hand"

In Seneca's Moral Letters 78: Athletae quantum plagarum ore, quantum toto corpore excipiunt! to receive blow in the face is plagam ore excipere: that is an ablative without preposition which would ...
d_e's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
374 views

Translation for "adventure"

One of the meanings of the word adventure is "exciting or remarkable experience", e.g. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland They were looking for adventure. Working with children can be a ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
206 views

Is there a way to say "download" and "upload" in Latin?

I checked neolatinlexicon and Google and I couldn't find anything
Nomad1004's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
145 views

Was there a Classical-era word for "lawyer" specifically?

In the time of the late Republic, an ōrātor like Cicero would give all sorts of speeches. And some of his most famous are either attacking or defending someone on trial. Was there a Classical-era word ...
Draconis's user avatar
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