Questions tagged [vocabulary]

This tag is for questions concerning the meaning and usage of individual words or a few words in conjunction with each other.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
5
votes
4answers
656 views

Translate “Eat, Drink, and be merry” to Latin

In the spirit of the holidays, I was thinking about how you would say Eat! Drink! Be Merry! in Latin (or written as Eat, drink, and be merry!). There are multiple words for each, but I'm not sure ...
5
votes
1answer
83 views

translation for Strength, love and courage to Latin

I would like to engrave a piece in Latin for my teenage son with our “family motto.” The motto is strength, love and courage. He is studying Latin and I want to be sure the word choice is accurate. ...
10
votes
1answer
177 views

Lonely vs. alone

A person is alone when there are no other people around. A person is lonely when the presence of other people is missed. Neither implies the other; you can be lonely but not alone or alone but not ...
7
votes
1answer
127 views

Composition of a word ἡμιόλιος

The Ancient Greek word ἡμιόλιος means literally "one and a half", referring to the ratio 3:2 and the interval of a perfect fifth in music. I wonder how this word is composed of: is it ἡμι- (...
6
votes
2answers
132 views

How would one say “Please let me do X thing”

Was wondering how one would say "Please let me do X thing" e.g. "Please let me love/win/see" Would you use some sort of impersonal construction, or would one use "permitto&...
6
votes
1answer
54 views

What is the meaning of “positive acceptus” in Gauss' Disquisitiones Arithmeticae §131?

From Gauss' Disquisitiones Arithmeticae §131: Sī p est numerus prīmus fōrmae 4n+1, erit +p, sī vērō p fōrmae 4n+3, erit -p residuum vel nōn-residuum cuiusvīs numerī prīmī quī positīvē acceptus ipsīus ...
2
votes
3answers
155 views

How do I say 'There is always a reason for a drink'?

in Dutch we say 'er is altijd een reden voor een borrel', which I want engraved on a whisky glass for my friend. How do you say 'There is always a reason for a drink' in Latin? On the internet, I find ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

What are some ancient words that mean forgiveness?

What are some ancient words that mean forgiveness? I’m looking for words that were used before the common era (before 0 CE). I’m looking for words from Latin, Greek, German, and other languages. These ...
4
votes
1answer
75 views

How to change the “Ex libris” (from books) used in books to get the meaning “from diaries”?

I do not know any Latin at all. Could you please help me to solve the following problem? I am wondering what would be a correct equivalent for "ex libris" used in books to change the meaning ...
5
votes
1answer
109 views

What are the Latin translations of the mathematical terms differentiating, integrating and parameterizing?

I didn't find any site that translates these verbs in the mathematical sense. What are the Latin translations of these terms, and are there any sites that offer Latin translations of modern ...
4
votes
1answer
632 views

Is there a Latin word for “vessel”, as in a human receiver or holder or something

I'm looking for a Latin word for "vessel", which in English can mean a person who receives or holds something immaterial. Options I've found so far are receptor,acceptor, gerulus, and ...
4
votes
1answer
145 views

What's the meaning of onava?

This question is derived from another one posted in the Spanish Language site. In the original question OP was asking about the meaning of the word onava. We have not been able to find such word in ...
6
votes
1answer
639 views

Can we finally know the difference between these words?

There seem to be four different Latin words, all of which are common, and all of which seem to mean exactly the same thing, "finally": tandem denique demum postremo Is there any difference ...
1
vote
2answers
76 views

New Life - Latin translation

I’m looking for farm name ideas and am stuck on the concept of it being a “new life”... celebrating a changing of life’s season, etc. All I can find really is the general translation, I’m not sure how ...
9
votes
2answers
865 views

How to say that I have used up all of something?

Suppose that I have a book that has given me a lot of good hints but now I feel that I have exhausted the book and used up all it can give. Is there a Latin verb that I could use to express this? The ...
2
votes
2answers
89 views

What would be correct way to say “very fortunate “

Trying to find the correct adjective for “very lucky/very fortunate “ in feminine singular. Valde fortunata or ipsum fortunata?
6
votes
1answer
75 views

“Project Management” in Latin

I was looking for a translation for "project management" and its adjacents (project manager etc.). There's surprisingly few direct translations for "project", but I've managed to ...
5
votes
1answer
112 views

Creating a Latin motto

I want to craft a Latin motto for a literary work. This motto would mean "I seek peace, I make war by duty". I thought about this: "Pacem adfecto, officiosus bellum gero". I have ...
4
votes
1answer
440 views

Translating “cum chordis corda, cum fidibus fides”

I’m having trouble understanding the following construction: cum chordis corda, cum fidibus fides It is taken from a German manuscript by Dietericus mentioning that the human body should be like a ...
10
votes
2answers
2k views

How to say “To serve, not to be served” in Latin?

I would like to know how to translate the phrase "To serve, not to be served" in Latin. It doesn't have to be a word for word translation. But, I want to know the phrase that would give the ...
7
votes
2answers
394 views

Translation of devom

I'm looking to find the translation of devom. I have looked for a translation online and in dictionaries and come up empty. In Arthur Machen's The Great God Pan he quotes an inscription: DEVOMNODENTi ...
4
votes
1answer
152 views

What is “formatting” in Latin?

I would like to adapt the proverb dē gustibus nōn est disputandum ("there's no accounting for taste") to refer to formatting—the layout of text on a page, the font selection, the use of ...
8
votes
1answer
171 views

Difference between 'urbe' and 'oppidum'?

I have found that LLPSI uses oppidum to describe cities (at least in the early chapters) while Duolingo uses urbe. What is the difference, and which should I usually use?
6
votes
2answers
111 views

What is a “rough draft” in Latin?

Suppose I'm preparing a speech for the Senate floor, and I want to make sure it sounds just right before I present it. So I come up with a rough draft, then revise it several times until I'm satisfied ...
4
votes
2answers
169 views

A noun meaning “survivor”

I am looking for a noun meaning "survivor". It looks like the closest in meaning is the adjective superstes. Can that be used as a noun, and if so how do you decline it? Per the post on ...
3
votes
1answer
105 views

Difference between geminus and gemellus

Both geminus and gemellus seem to have similar meanings: twin-born, born together, twins. Is the main difference between these two words how they were used, or did they have additional meanings that ...
3
votes
3answers
135 views

What case does 'plus' take?

I don't have any information about what case to use with 'plus' (or 'magis'). In dictionaries usually only prepositions take some case, and it is showed in parentheses. In my language, 'more' takes ...
3
votes
0answers
33 views

What are the meanings of servus and minister in ecclesiatical latin?

Reading the answers to another question I thought about the meaning of servus and minister in christian/ecclesiastical latin. It seems to me that in classical latin servus related clearly to the legal ...
2
votes
2answers
274 views

How do I say, “In pursuit of Truth, Beauty, and Goodness”?

I know "Truth, Beauty, Goodness" is "Veritas, Bonitas, Pulcritudo." But do I need an "et" before "Pulcritudo"? When do you use and's in Latin? And how would ...
5
votes
2answers
125 views

What is the best Greek word for a thrown knife?

In the Netflix show The Umbrella Academy, one character has a limited form of telekinesis: he can manipulate the movement of knives that he throws. If I wanted to give this ability a pretentious Greek ...
7
votes
2answers
238 views

What is the source of the Greek phrase πύξ, λάξ, δάξ?

πύξ, λάξ, δάξ "by punching, kicking, and biting" is described by Wikipedia as an "epigram describing how laypersons were chased away from the Eleusinian Mysteries". Where is this ...
5
votes
0answers
78 views

Well, well, well

How to say this expression in Latin!? Expressing surprise: Well, well, well! It is here (when smth lost and found)! Expressing sarcasm: Well, well, well... And what now!? Expressing begining: Well, ...
6
votes
2answers
141 views

Confusing syntax in two sentences

I seem to be confused by the constructions of these two sentences from a Medieval Latin text: Unde vocum alia suavis est illa, scilicet quae subtilis, spissa, clara et acuta est. and Multiplicem ...
4
votes
0answers
72 views

Passage from Odington

I am looking at a short passage from Odington's treaty on music, and am unsure about the last bit, particularly the meaning of "abiectus" in this context. I admit to having limited skill reading Latin-...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

Are there any general rules for creating 'proper' Latin neologisms, beyond matching gender, number, and case?

For the sake of this question, I'm going to be using this definition of neologism, "A newly coined word or phrase." From my understanding, the loose etymology of this word is the French neo plus Greek ...
8
votes
1answer
276 views

Can “sum” and “nemo” work together to create a phrase meaning “I am no one?”

I have been trying to understand the relationship between "sum" and "nemo", to create a phrase meaning something like "I am no one". In all the contexts I personally ...
2
votes
1answer
134 views

Res vs Obiectus

What is the difference in meaning between Res and Obiectus (is it merely a matter of Language evolution Classical vs Medieval)? As a meaning I am interested in that which (the thing that) is related ...
3
votes
0answers
62 views

What is a “camarilla” in Latin?

The Spanish word camarilla means a group of conspirators meeting in secret to manipulate the political leadership. It's been borrowed into English, as well as quite a few other Romance languages, ...
6
votes
3answers
237 views

What would “opossum” be in Latin?

I was wondering how one would translate the word "opossum" into Latin. It derives from Native American names for opossum meaning variably "white dog" and "white animal," so it could be translated ...
9
votes
2answers
1k views

What should an epidemic be called in Latin?

Is there a good Latin word for an epidemic or even a pandemic? The word epidemia is probably easily understood by most, but it doesn't seem to be a classical one. The adjective epidemus is attested ...
3
votes
2answers
169 views

“Man to Man” in Latin?

I've been spending a lot of time on this one but not quite sure how you would preserve the idiomatic connotation of the phrase "man to man". I'm planning to use it in a sentence like "they were ...
6
votes
1answer
100 views

Mountains and Mountain Ranges: Names

I have been recently enjoying Mark Walker's delightful translation of Professor Tolkien's masterpiece, The Hobbit (Hobbitus Ille). I was especially charmed by Tolkien's maps, translated into Latin (...
3
votes
1answer
87 views

I’m exploring names for a fictional space agency. Which would be more correct?

I’d like it to have the acronym "ET" Would it be better for it to be: excelsior terra or excelsior tellus I’m sure that there are better ways to express this though I have always liked the ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Latin word for “liar”

Is there a succinct pronoun for a person who is a liar? You could make a phrase for a person who lies using mentior, or construct a sentence about the lie itself with mendacium, but what a single word ...
5
votes
1answer
131 views

Translate compound word “airship” to Latin

Is there a more idiomatic way to translate "airship" than something like navis aeris (maybe this already is natural to a native speaker)? A compound word like "Airship" in English feels like a more ...
4
votes
1answer
72 views

Translating “lesson” into Latin

Salvete, How do people normally translate "lesson" into Latin for use in modern conversation? English and many other languages derive their word from lectio (reading), so I suppose that would only be ...
18
votes
1answer
2k views

Are there Latin words known only by reconstruction from Romance languages?

I presume that many Latin words made it to the Romance languages, but were never attested in writing, whether because they were limited to Vulgar Latin or just because by chance no writer used them ...
2
votes
3answers
76 views

How do I know the difference between crying out, crying tears, and war cry?

All the words just say cry. I want to find a word that means crying as in crying tears, but all I see are words for war cry and crying out.
4
votes
2answers
120 views

How would the Romans have borrowed the word “Dune”?

Following up on my previous question about a latin word for "dunes", how would the Romans have adopted and latinized a word of Germanic origin like "dune"? I found a few examples of similar sounding ...
6
votes
1answer
503 views

Is there a Latin word for “dune”?

Did the Romans have a word for "dune", as in sand dunes? There are plenty of words relating to sand itself, but I can't find anything specifically about dunes. There is a placed called Arenae Montes (...

1
2 3 4 5
13