Questions tagged [vocabulary]

This tag is for questions concerning the meaning and usage of individual words or a few words in conjunction with each other.

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On the function of dignus

Usually, when we say Marcus dignus amictiā we mean that Marcus is entitled to or worthy of friendship. Keeping the direction but increasing volume we can say "Marcus (On account of his character) ...
d_e's user avatar
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2k views

"Ghost", as in the noun

I would like to know how to say "Ghost" properly, as in I am a ghost. All I have been able to find is "Mares";"Marium";"Spectare"...etc. I would prefer if ...
PunKn303's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
406 views

What does POSSVit mean in this latin inscription that appears in a novel?

What does POSSVit mean in this latin inscription that appears in a novel? hi. does anyone know in machen's "great god pan" the latin inscription that is supposed to appear on a Roman ...
JTR777's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
139 views

What's the Difference Between αχρι and μεχρι?

This is a question about ancient Greek language. I thought this would be the best place to post the question as there are other Greek questions here and stack-exchange doesn't have a Greek forum. If ...
Phillip's user avatar
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29 views

How to say "relation" (as in diplomatic relation between parties)

How to term the connection between two entitles whether between countries or between individuals. How to say something like: "The relation between the brothers were once tense, but now they are ...
d_e's user avatar
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Greek/Latin lexical or compositorial correspondences

I'm always intrigued by lexical correspondences and kinships and the underlying etymology (where it is not completely obvious, of course), such as between English town and German Zaun, English war and ...
Lumi's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
551 views

Is there any difference between "Benedicat tibi" and "Benedicat te"? Which is the correct translation for "Bless you"?

I find that the Vulgate shows "benedicat tibi Dominus" and I read online that there are posts saying "Benedicat te" as well. I have not found that "benedico" has to go ...
Valentine Vincent's user avatar
6 votes
0 answers
95 views

"Friendless" in Latin?

I am looking for a general strategy for translating adjectives like "friendless" into Latin. My interest is general, but for concreteness I will discuss my thoughts in light of this example. ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
919 views

What is the meaning of audio?

Sometimes people use the term "hearing Mass". For example, it is used in the Six Precepts of the Church where it is a translation of the Latin "Missam audire": To hear Mass on ...
harry jansson's user avatar
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0 answers
36 views

How would I say something along the lines of "no kicks no glory", "no kickstart no glory"

The intention is to point out that there is no glory in starting your motorcycle with electricity. Starting up your engine by kicking your kickstart is the one true and pure way. I tried to figure it ...
Max Ohert's user avatar
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Is there an antonymous phrase to dies mali?

"dismal" in English was originated from Latin dies mali ‘evil days’. Is there an antonymous phrase to dies mali? If yes, is there an English word originated from that?
Tim's user avatar
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How to interpret "tertio" in the context of dates?

I often see dates expressed as, for example, tertio idus maias where idus is the feminine accusative plural and maias is the adjective agreeing with idus relating to the month of May. So, the question ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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10 votes
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Questions on reading the prologue of Aesopus Latinus via LLPSI

Duplex libelli dos est: quod risum movet  et quod prudenti vitam consilio monet. Calumniari si quis autem voluerit  quod arbores loquantur, non tantum ferae, ... (Line 3~6) Dos is explained as a ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
101 views

Why is the name of Athens (Athenae) plural?

The Latin word for Athens, Athenae, is plural. Why is this?
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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12 votes
2 answers
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Why is the Latin word for plum so close to the name of Damascus?

The Latin word for plum is damascena, and the capital of Syria is Damascus. Are these names related? Why is Latin word for plum so close to the name of Syrian capital? Did Damascus have good plums in ...
Snack Exchange's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
686 views

What does "nosse" mean?

What does nosse mean? I cannot find it in Lewis & Short. For example: Quam ob rem, quod quaesivit ex me P. Apuleius, homo et multis officiis mihi et summa familiaritate coniunctus et vobis ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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How would you properly translate "of the Gods" into Latin?

I am trying to translate the phrase "of the gods" into Latin. Google translate says it would be deorum, however I am skeptical of the accuracy of Google translate, other sources say it is ...
Devon Grant's user avatar
8 votes
0 answers
225 views

Quidquid vs quæcumque

Both quidquid and quæcumque are ways of translating English whatever or all things that [sth.], but is there any difference in meaning in that specific context? I have a vague notion, not based in ...
Rafael's user avatar
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1 vote
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The feeling of home

I believe there is an idiom in English that says: It feels like home Or something [about it] felt [somehow] like home This means when you’re at a place where you feel comfortable and as if it was ...
Samuelis Grisseldis's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
838 views

How can I express "to make a wish"?

I want a phrase for "to make a wish" instead of a single verb "to wish", in order to make the line of lyrics long enough for the music. The noun for "wish" may be optatum,...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
134 views

Was the Latin verb "stimulare" ("to stimulate", from the noun "stimulus" meaning "sting") attested in the meaning "to sting (of an insect)"?

The Latin verb "stimulare" (to urge, to stimulate) comes from the noun "stimulus" (sting of a bee or a similar animal). Was it ever attested in the meaning "to sting (of a bee)...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
1k views

Does "virtus" apply to women?

Virtus, literally "manlihood", is the origin of English virtue and is often so translated. As far as I know, virtus mainly refers to "courage", "strength" and other "...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
174 views

What is the difference between Obsculta and Exaudi?

In the Rule of St Benedict we find: Obsculta, o fili, præcepta magistri, https://www.thelatinlibrary.com/benedict.html We also have this in some prayers: Exaudī nos Domine sancte, Pater omnipotens, ...
harry jansson's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
257 views

Would a cat be considered a "bestia"?

I am trying to understand what the word "bestia" meant. Did it have the same connotations as the English word "beast" and the Croatian word "zvijer"? Would somebody who ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
3k views

What does "Potochoterophii Fohsiensis" possibly mean in a Latin cryptogram from "Cocker's Decimal Arithmetic" textbook?

I was reading an old math textbook, Cocker's Decimal Arithmetic, and came across this cryptogram: The question I have is about the beginning of the text: Anixo guo Anamfiggino Jorammi Lehkeg ...
Charles Hoffmann's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
227 views

when to use *tria* vs. *tres* and why?

"Quot liberi in familia sunt? ____[III] liberi." "Vir, puer, puella ____[III] vocabula sunt." "Rhenus et Danuvius et Tiberis ____[III] fluvii sunt." #when would I use ...
hey's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
148 views

Learning *About* Something in Latin

As I understand it, the usual verb for learning in Latin is discō. Looking at Lewis & Short on Perseus [link] it seems like this is attested with an accusative (in the sense "to learn NOUN&...
Tristan's user avatar
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1 answer
50 views

How would you translate "purposefulness"?

Purposefulness or goal-orientedness. I've seen such translations as "propositum" or "voluntas", but they seem to refer to "purpose", not to the quality of sticking to a ...
Roman Rudenko's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
167 views

Auto-antonyms in Latin

It seems there are no questions on this site about it because I can't search out. An auto-antonym (also called contronym, antagonym, Janus word, etc.) is a word whose antonym can be itself. For ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
196 views

Can 'superiore' mean 'previous years' (plural)?

Under the year 1558, George Buchanan writes (Rerum Scoticarum Historia, 1582): Hoc anno et superiore etiam, caussa religionis quodam modo iacuisse videbatur, quod morte... In the standard English ...
user558840's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
221 views

encrypt / to hide a message in Latin

What was the verb(s) the Romans used when the hide/encrypt a message in another text (and also the antonym "to decipher")? After consulting Döderlein's Hand-book of Latin Synonymes (Celare), ...
d_e's user avatar
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6 votes
3 answers
1k views

How to translate "It is easy to remember"?

"remember" here means "to call to mind", and I considered "facilis + supine" construction, but verbs for this meaning (memini, reminiscor, recordor) are all too special ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
100 views

"Receive blow in the face with hand"

In Seneca's Moral Letters 78: Athletae quantum plagarum ore, quantum toto corpore excipiunt! to receive blow in the face is plagam ore excipere: that is an ablative without preposition which would ...
d_e's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
304 views

Translation for "adventure"

One of the meanings of the word adventure is "exciting or remarkable experience", e.g. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland They were looking for adventure. Working with children can be a ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
175 views

Is there a way to say "download" and "upload" in Latin?

I checked neolatinlexicon and Google and I couldn't find anything
Nomad1004's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
130 views

Was there a Classical-era word for "lawyer" specifically?

In the time of the late Republic, an ōrātor like Cicero would give all sorts of speeches. And some of his most famous are either attacking or defending someone on trial. Was there a Classical-era word ...
Draconis's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
915 views

Is there a way to say the phrase "Buy time" in Latin?

Is there a way to say the phrase "Buy time", as in to buy oneself time? Example sentence: "He bought himself some time" or "He bought himself time"
Nomad1004's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
313 views

How do you say the verb "switch/switch to" in Latin?

I want to know how you say the idea of "switch to" in Latin. I wasn't able to find a translation For example if I want to say something like: "I was using this tool, but I switched to a ...
Nomad1004's user avatar
  • 315
1 vote
1 answer
86 views

What's the best way to say the noun "Objective" in Latin?

What's the best way to say "Objective" in Latin? As in, "Your next objective is to do [insert thing here]"?
Nomad1004's user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
2k views

Best modern translation for "Emperor"?

The word "Emperor" seems a bit hard to pin down in Latin when looking for a constant expression to use, because of its multiple synonyms that seem to have been employed frequently throughout ...
Victor BC's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
142 views

What is the best Latin translation of 'towards truth'?

I am looking to create a Substack publication where I can share articles I have written on philosophy. I want to choose a name for the website that best summarises or encapsulates the nature of the ...
Joseph's user avatar
  • 31
7 votes
2 answers
743 views

Is there a singular of 'mānēs'?

The mānēs or dī mānēs, the benevolent spirits of the underworld, are usually addressed as a collective. But what if I want to talk about one specific benevolent spirit? Is the singular (*manis perhaps?...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
72 views

What is going on with the symbol in the weight here?

So this is an image from William Musgrave's account of the Southbroom Hoard discovered outside Devizes, Wiltshire, in England in 1714. They seem to be some local's cache hidden away around the reign ...
lly's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
91 views

What would big/difficult/formal words be like in Latin?

Latin has approximately 40.000 words. A really small number for a language. How can we know when the word is "big" or formal in Latin? English uses the words from Latin to sound formal. I ...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
104 views

Morituri - Grammar

Basic, I'm sure, but I've read that this form is infinitive - to die - but also can mean 'we who are about to die'. I'm newish to Latin grammar - what is the name of the form/case(?) that could ...
alan redknap's user avatar
18 votes
3 answers
4k views

Is there a Latin equivalent for this particular nsfw term?

Thanks to Martial, I've come across a decent variety of sexual terms in Latin. Unfortunately, these words are generally difficult to look up in dictionaries, because of the archaic style Latin ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
108 views

How would you say "grass" as in "Green grass covers his grave."?

I am trying to translate some lyrics of a patriotic Croatian song in Latin. Here is what I've got thus far: Non sunt heroes, non sunt Croati, ita fortes ut Jelačić erat. Sed nunc eum atra terra tegit,...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
338 views

amatus or amatum - which one is the perfect passive participle form

I've just started studying Wheelock. In the Vocabula section, the entry for amo is amo, amare, amavi, amatum. Yet most dictionaries give the past participle as amatus. Which is correct?
Brian Birmingham's user avatar
7 votes
0 answers
65 views

16th century vocabulary - harpsichord

In a 16th century text about musical tuning by Benedetti, the author provides this diagram, which he uses to describe his process of tuning the notes on a harpsichord: In the text, he begins his ...
Thomas Nicholson's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
232 views

What is difference between adit and advenit?

In LLPSI I was introduced to two verbs "adit" and "advenit", but what is difference between them if both of them mean "to go to"? Same to "abit" and "exit&...
Umicron's user avatar
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