Questions tagged [vocabulary]

This tag is for questions concerning the meaning and usage of individual words or a few words in conjunction with each other.

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4
votes
2answers
81 views

Is “evidenter” the correct translation for “obviously!”?

I've searched the forum but found no answer to my question. How would one say obviously in Latin? As in answering a question with a "it's option b, obviously!" Online dictionaries have given ...
7
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1answer
311 views

In what sense is a university (universitas) a whole?

The word for a university in many languages (not Finnish though!) comes from the Latin word universitas. The word appears to mean roughly "the whole", but one might also analyze it along the ...
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0answers
42 views

Names for digits or numbers

How would you say "I write zeroes and ones" or "I need a fiver" or "the number seven" in Latin? There are a couple of cases where in some languages one uses instead of a ...
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2answers
1k views

How to say “fit” in Latin?

The English word "fit" has a number of different uses, and that makes searching difficult. I am looking for a verb or phrase to be used in a sentence like this: The souvenir does not fit in ...
24
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3answers
8k views

What is bullshit in Latin?

If a statement is blatantly wrong or shows lack of interest in the truth, one can call it bullshit in English. But how about Latin? Is there something more strong and colorful than falsus? I am not ...
5
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1answer
80 views

Seize your future

What would "Seize your future/the future" be in Latin? I've got Carpe futurum, but my latin is quite poor. I want to use it as a motto for an educational company. I want to use it as it ...
1
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1answer
51 views

Natural or unflavoured products

There are a number of different flavours of, say, yogurts, and one of them is plain, without any added flavours besides what is needed to make the yogurt. In English this flavour seems to be often ...
11
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3answers
492 views

Where does Pliny, or any ancient author, write about a stilus plumbeus?

Researching the history of the pencil the German speaking web is full of quotes that attribute to Pliny the mentioning of a stilus plumbeus as the historical and etymological source for the word ...
5
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1answer
191 views

Why did Romans think of novissimus as last?

In the letter of Plinius to Tacitus about his and his mother's flight, there is the following sentence: multi ad deos manus tollere, plures usquam iam deos ullos aeternamque illam et novissimam ...
2
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1answer
63 views

Translation Request, English to Latin

How can I translate this sentence to Latin, "Man in the palace! Remember death, live with fear of death. Leave us alone." I translate like that but... I don't know, I guess, I did a mistake. ...
1
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1answer
334 views

Mysterious word for “expert” in an Italian anthology's version of Sappho LP 21

In this Italian anthology, LP 21 l. 2 (the first line where the papyrus has letters) is read as containing επαβολησ (and perhaps vestigia around it). The first word in the translation is "esperta", ...
8
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3answers
941 views

How to translate “sexy”?

How would one translate “sexy” into Latin? In particular, I’m looking for a word or phrase that has a similar “slangy” feel to the English version. I’ve considered a few possibilities: Catullus 10 ...
4
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1answer
85 views

What is a street sign in Latin?

It recently occurred to me that I don't know what to call a street sign in Latin. I know that a general word for "sign" is signum, but the dictionaries I consulted do not specify whether it ...
2
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1answer
42 views

Ubi jus ibi remedium

I am trying to make sense of the phrase ubi jus ibi remedium. It seems incomplete, and I feel I should add two verbs and something to separate the two sentences, for example: Ubi jus est, ibi est ...
4
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2answers
250 views

About supplemented word ὀλόφῳ in a fusion of Lobel-Page fragments from an Italian Sappho anthology

This Italian Sappho anthology, on p. 57-58, has a fusion of several Lobel-Page fragments (cfr this question of mine), among which is 67(a). In l. 3 of that fragment, which is l. 16 of the fusion, the ...
4
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1answer
194 views

Two kinds of falling

The English verb "fall", when the subject is a human, has two main kinds of literal1 meaning as far as I can tell: A change of position: Moving suddenly from higher elevation to lower. (The ...
5
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1answer
295 views

'i have never made' in latin

I've tried to search for this phrase, but I haven't found an answer. I looked it up on google translate and it says 'nunquam fecit.' I don't think it's correct.
8
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1answer
1k views

How to emphasize adjectives?

In English, and most modern European languages, we have one single word, "very," which is accepted as the regular way to make an adjective more extreme. Is there a common way to do this in Latin? Ways ...
5
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1answer
55 views

What is the meaning of “positive acceptus” in Gauss' Disquisitiones Arithmeticae §131?

From Gauss' Disquisitiones Arithmeticae §131: Sī p est numerus prīmus fōrmae 4n+1, erit +p, sī vērō p fōrmae 4n+3, erit -p residuum vel nōn-residuum cuiusvīs numerī prīmī quī positīvē acceptus ipsīus ...
5
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2answers
155 views

Aurora Natalis or Aurora Natalicus?

I have practically no experience with Latin, but from what I understand Aurora Borealis roughly means northern dawn, and Aurora Australis roughly means southern dawn. What would be the equivalent way ...
3
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2answers
417 views

Does “aurea” have the second meaning?

Does "aurea" have the second meaning? According to Latin Word Study Tool, aurea doesn't mean "the bridle of a horse" in the following context in my opinion: "trecenta quoque ...
4
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4answers
668 views

Translate “Eat, Drink, and be merry” to Latin

In the spirit of the holidays, I was thinking about how you would say Eat! Drink! Be Merry! in Latin (or written as Eat, drink, and be merry!). There are multiple words for each, but I'm not sure ...
5
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2answers
133 views

How would one say “Please let me do X thing”

Was wondering how one would say "Please let me do X thing" e.g. "Please let me love/win/see" Would you use some sort of impersonal construction, or would one use "permitto&...
4
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1answer
115 views

translation for Strength, love and courage to Latin

I would like to engrave a piece in Latin for my teenage son with our “family motto.” The motto is strength, love and courage. He is studying Latin and I want to be sure the word choice is accurate. ...
10
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1answer
178 views

Lonely vs. alone

A person is alone when there are no other people around. A person is lonely when the presence of other people is missed. Neither implies the other; you can be lonely but not alone or alone but not ...
7
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1answer
134 views

Composition of a word ἡμιόλιος

The Ancient Greek word ἡμιόλιος means literally "one and a half", referring to the ratio 3:2 and the interval of a perfect fifth in music. I wonder how this word is composed of: is it ἡμι- (...
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6answers
544 views

“Mind the gap!”

I am currently in London, and the Underground has been kind enough to repeat this warning numerous times: Please mind the gap between the train and the platform! Having heard the same phrase over ...
5
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2answers
189 views

Comparing words for resistance

The English word "resistance" is obviously etymologically related to resistentia, and I would like to understand how good of a translation resistentia. To be clear, I mean resistance in the sense of a ...
6
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1answer
195 views

<quality> even for being a <noun>

Salvēte omnēs, hocc erit mihi prīmum rogātum hāc in sēde. Haud dūdum vīdī quendam hominem scīscitārī, quōmodo posset Latīnē dīcī "he has a long tail, even for a cat". Ad quod rogātum cum respondēre ...
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3answers
165 views

How do I say 'There is always a reason for a drink'?

in Dutch we say 'er is altijd een reden voor een borrel', which I want engraved on a whisky glass for my friend. How do you say 'There is always a reason for a drink' in Latin? On the internet, I find ...
17
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1answer
1k views

Are there feminine and neuter versions of “professor”?

From many verbs one can derive an agent noun for each gender: computare > computator (m), computatrix (f), computatrum (n) scribere > scriptor, scriptrix, scriptrum Some of these derivatives ...
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0answers
46 views

What are some ancient words that mean forgiveness?

What are some ancient words that mean forgiveness? I’m looking for words that were used before the common era (before 0 CE). I’m looking for words from Latin, Greek, German, and other languages. These ...
4
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1answer
75 views

How to change the “Ex libris” (from books) used in books to get the meaning “from diaries”?

I do not know any Latin at all. Could you please help me to solve the following problem? I am wondering what would be a correct equivalent for "ex libris" used in books to change the meaning ...
5
votes
1answer
110 views

What are the Latin translations of the mathematical terms differentiating, integrating and parameterizing?

I didn't find any site that translates these verbs in the mathematical sense. What are the Latin translations of these terms, and are there any sites that offer Latin translations of modern ...
4
votes
1answer
77 views

Proper way to say “Traveler's Writ/Licence/Certificate”

I am looking for more or less the 'proper' (or any good approximation) way to translate a "Traveler's Writ," as in a certificate or license given to a traveler that allows him legal access to an area. ...
8
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3answers
469 views

How would I talk about supernatural “possession”?

Many stories, both ancient and modern, concern "possession": a supernatural entity of some sort takes over a human or animal body and controls it. Is there a Classical Latin word for this phenomenon? ...
4
votes
1answer
636 views

Is there a Latin word for “vessel”, as in a human receiver or holder or something

I'm looking for a Latin word for "vessel", which in English can mean a person who receives or holds something immaterial. Options I've found so far are receptor,acceptor, gerulus, and ...
4
votes
1answer
147 views

What's the meaning of onava?

This question is derived from another one posted in the Spanish Language site. In the original question OP was asking about the meaning of the word onava. We have not been able to find such word in ...
6
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1answer
647 views

Can we finally know the difference between these words?

There seem to be four different Latin words, all of which are common, and all of which seem to mean exactly the same thing, "finally": tandem denique demum postremo Is there any difference ...
5
votes
1answer
544 views

Are there any words in Latin that are “light”?

In Latin, every syllable is either "light" or "heavy". A "heavy" syllable is one that has a long vowel and/or a coda consonant, and a "light" syllable is anything else. This distinction is important ...
4
votes
1answer
169 views

Inaccurate translation of phrases in Latin with word “defender”

I'm trying to translate the following words to Latin (see blockquote). And I've used various translation tools, but I have a strong feeling it's inaccurate. These ones I would like to have correctly ...
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2answers
88 views

New Life - Latin translation

I’m looking for farm name ideas and am stuck on the concept of it being a “new life”... celebrating a changing of life’s season, etc. All I can find really is the general translation, I’m not sure how ...
6
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1answer
236 views

What does “Filiane” mean?

I am learning Latin from Collar and Daniell's FIRST YEAR LATIN. In LESSON IV: THE GENITIVE CASE TO DENOTE POSSESSION, an exercise is given (sentence translation). Some examples: Līberatne? Līberō, ...
12
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3answers
6k views

What is the difference between Iesus and Jesu?

In the Latin version of the Gloria, the name Jesus is rendered as "Domine Fili unigenite Jesu Christe". However, in the Latin Vulgate, the name of Jesus is rendered as "Iesus". What is the name of ...
4
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0answers
163 views

How would you translate γέγονεν in John 1:15?

I'm translating the 15th verse of John 1, and I'm curious to know the nuances of translating the phrase ὁ ὀπίσω μου ἐρχόμενος ἔμπροσθέν μου γέγονεν, and especially the word γέγονεν. Below is the NA28 ...
4
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3answers
224 views

Best Latin translation of an English Phrase “Always Present, Never Seen”

I am designing some potential products for my organization, and I want to include a version that includes a tag line written in Latin of one of the our organizational values. The phrase I'm looking ...
9
votes
1answer
152 views

What word did the Romans use to describe a hot, dry, sandy desert?

Did the Romans during the classical era have a word for a dry, hot, desert? There is desertum, but that is more "wilderness" than explicitly desert in the sense we might think of today. ...
8
votes
2answers
866 views

How to say that I have used up all of something?

Suppose that I have a book that has given me a lot of good hints but now I feel that I have exhausted the book and used up all it can give. Is there a Latin verb that I could use to express this? The ...
4
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0answers
72 views

Passage from Odington

I am looking at a short passage from Odington's treaty on music, and am unsure about the last bit, particularly the meaning of "abiectus" in this context. I admit to having limited skill reading Latin-...
8
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1answer
294 views

Can “sum” and “nemo” work together to create a phrase meaning “I am no one?”

I have been trying to understand the relationship between "sum" and "nemo", to create a phrase meaning something like "I am no one". In all the contexts I personally ...

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