Questions tagged [vocabulary]

This tag is for questions concerning the meaning and usage of individual words or a few words in conjunction with each other.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
5 votes
1 answer
1k views

Is "Ad astra, per sanguinem" the correct translation of "To the stars, through blood."

I am wanting to get this phrase as a tattoo. I want to make sure this is the best way to translate this to match the original meaning in English. Also, I am wondering about this alternative phrase &...
5 votes
1 answer
99 views

to make a pass at/ hit on

Has anyone in their reading come across Latin words for to ‘hit on’ in the sense of speaking or behaving in a way that shows they want to have a sexual relationship with you. [informal] ‘She was ...
9 votes
2 answers
2k views

How do you say "I am vaccinated" in Latin?

How do you say that you have been vaccinated in Latin? I'm not sure how to construct this tense, and I'm not familiar with a modern Latin verb for "vaccinate".
11 votes
3 answers
176 views

Are there any Latin words with sharply contrasting meanings?

The English word madam can mean A polite form of address for a woman or lady. (slang) A woman who runs a brothel, particularly one that specializes in finding prostitutes for rich and ...
8 votes
1 answer
1k views

How is that there are two different words, comparo, that appear to be identical?

In various dictionaries, like Lewis & Short, there are two completely separate entries for the word comparo, which otherwise appear to be identical in conjugation. How is that these two entries ...
9 votes
3 answers
2k views

What is the opposite of 'sui generis'?

Just wondering if there is an accepted opposite of this term, maybe something like 'generalis generis'?
5 votes
0 answers
102 views

Classical Translation for "aura, vibrations, feeling"

I have struggled in finding an adequate translation for the above mentioned words, that designate the subtle ambiance that something is thought to emit or convey. Like "she gives me negative ...
2 votes
1 answer
95 views

Relationship between subeo and subeor? or polliceo and polliceor?

The compound word sub+eo seems to appear in two different forms, subeo and subeor. One is a normal indicative form, the other deponent. They appear to mean more or less the same thing. What is the ...
5 votes
1 answer
90 views

What is the meaning of praeprimis?

I came across the word "praeprimis" when reading some 17th century Latin (Experimenta nova, Otto von Guericke, b. 4 ch. 15 ). To my best guess, it's a combination of "praecipue" ...
5 votes
2 answers
121 views

Translation of "The ant labors for the good of the nest"

I'm looking to translate "The ant labors for the good of the nest", or to rephrase, "The ant works for the benefit of the nest/hive/colony". So far I've come up with: formica ...
21 votes
2 answers
2k views

Are there feminine and neuter versions of "professor"?

From many verbs one can derive an agent noun for each gender: computare > computator (m), computatrix (f), computatrum (n) scribere > scriptor, scriptrix, scriptrum Some of these derivatives ...
6 votes
1 answer
197 views

What does 'spatio pollicarir emotius' mean in Otto von Guericke's Experimenta Nova?

In Otto von Guericke's Experimenta Nova (1672) he says (in reference to experiments showing how a feather floats above and sometimes is reattracted to a globe of sulphur): Filum lineum, si acumini ...
4 votes
0 answers
49 views

Is postid a derived form or an archaic form of post?

I pondered this since reading some Plautus. It seems similar to postea (post ea), just being in singular (so post id?), or perhaps it is the obsolete earlier form of post itself. Just curious if there ...
1 vote
1 answer
41 views

Meanings of 'furo'

I am finding some conflicting information about the word furo. According to Lewis and Short, it only means furo/furere, a defective 3rd conjugation word meaning to be in a rage. In L&S, only furor ...
1 vote
1 answer
101 views

What would be the name for government for, from, and by

The people Shareholders The king Investors Customers Tax payers Plus explanation. From sources, I've heard that those are Democracy Metochocracy Monarchy Ependocracy Pelatarchy What? I may be wrong....
5 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is there a Latin word for 225th anniversary?

If bicentennial is the Latin word for the 200th anniversary, what word would one use for the 225th anniversary?
9 votes
1 answer
976 views

Why 'Vir' is the only word of 2nd declension with -ir ending?

I'd like a detailed explanation of the word 'Vir' denclesion. Vir is the only word of the second denclension with 'ir' ending. What is the reason for this phenomenon? Anyone knows a research about it ...
6 votes
1 answer
292 views

Using "sānē" v. "certē" v. "profectō"?

The dictionary definitions of these three words aren't particularly helpful in figuring out when to use which one. Lewis Elementary's definition of sānē includes indeed, doubtless, by all means, ...
3 votes
1 answer
196 views

Words for "Biased Arguments" in Latin

Is there such an expression in Latin that describes the following situations: Someone using arguments based on fear, patriotism and race/nationalism instead of logic for the purpose of trying to ...
1 vote
1 answer
113 views

Interpolation of words by scholars leads to changes in the meaning

The following sentence is from "De architecture" a 1 BCE book(English translation) Uti autem Aristarchus Samius mathematicus vigore magno rationes varietatis disciplinis de eadem <re> ...
3 votes
0 answers
50 views

Reading of "licet" in the following sentence

The following sentence is from a 5th-century book [12] Rursus terra accepto solis lumine clarescit tantummodo, non relucet, luna speculi instar lumen quo illustratur emittit, quia illa aeris et aquae,...
10 votes
2 answers
3k views

Latin Phrase for "It goes without saying"

The title of the question pretty much sums it up. I am looking for a Latin phrase for the English expression "It goes without saying." I am not sure if an analogous expression exists- although I would ...
5 votes
2 answers
330 views

How do I do something "hard"?

"Hard" is sometimes used as an adverb in English to emphasize a physical action, or indicate that it was especially vigorous or forceful. For example, "he hit the ground hard when he fell", or "she ...
3 votes
1 answer
60 views

What does "passit" mean?

I encountered the word "passit" in the following statement by Lucretius: Accidere ex una flamma parva incendia passit. I cannot find the word passit in dictionaries. What does it mean?
1 vote
1 answer
51 views

Translating "I will go all the way" [duplicate]

I need help translating the English sentence "I will go all the way" into Latin. This will be used as a motto. Thanks in advance :)
2 votes
2 answers
857 views

What is the Latin word for “software”?

What is the Latin word for “software”? “Programmatura”, “corpus programmatum” and “mollopus” were suggested on Vicipaedia.
7 votes
1 answer
468 views

Where did the missing forms of nemo go?

The pronoun nemo is usually said to have only nominative, accusative and dative forms (nemo, neminem, nemini). The other forms, including plural, are easy to form, since nemo seems to come from ne+...
4 votes
1 answer
110 views

Is "Fantasia" a classical Latin word? What was its original meaning?

I'm indecisive as to what title to chose for a novel I finished writing. I went for a pseudo-Latin title : "Apex Fantasia" as it is a fantasy novel. But I still wonder if I can find ...
3 votes
1 answer
99 views

How to say "oath-breaker" in Latin?

How can I translate "oath-breaker" properly into Latin in reference to losing one's faith?
31 votes
6 answers
89k views

How do you say "yes" and "no" in Classical Latin?

I'm wondering how the Romans would have said "yes" as in "yes please" or "no" as in "no thank you". I don't know if they would have said it exactly like that, but what would they have said if they had ...
10 votes
4 answers
2k views

Tantibus: genuine Latin word, or made-up?

I came across the word tantibus while reading this page (as part of a bigger word, amalgotantibus), where it's claimed to be Latin for "nightmare"; a little bit of digging also revealed that it's the ...
3 votes
1 answer
73 views

form to learn a new word in

When I learn a new word in Latin, should I learn it in a form: excluding diacritic (pax - peace) or: including diacritic (pāx - peace) ? (question number one) I have never seen the diacritic ...
1 vote
0 answers
34 views

Ex + sisto preposition choice

Why is it exsisto instead of subsisto? Between the verbs sisto and ἵστημι there seems to be an almost perfect correspondence in meaning but the prepositions switch from exsisto to ὑφίστημι (which ...
8 votes
1 answer
126 views

many, much, a lot of in Latin

Can the Latin word multus be used both for expressing greater amounts of both countable and uncountable nouns? (in English there is many for countable, much for uncountable or the universal a lot of) ...
57 votes
5 answers
11k views

Are "-que" and "et" equivalent?

I was taught that one can use the '-que' suffix to string together multiple words, in a similar way to putting 'et' between them. Are these two equivalent? Did one have a connotation in classical (...
3 votes
0 answers
66 views

On words with non-Classical meanings in LLPSI

I found Lingua Latina per se Illustrata(LLPSI) use the word kalendārium for calendar (as in Chap. 13, and the official Latin-English wordbook), but in both dictionaries L&S and OLD there is just ...
6 votes
1 answer
347 views

How would you translate "The Adorned" for use as a collective title?

I took a few years of Latin back in high school, but my understanding of the language never really surpassed novice levels. I've been brainstorming names for a wolf pack in a story of mine; a lot of ...
2 votes
1 answer
114 views

How to express a prayer intention

I'm new-ish to speaking Latin - specifically praying in Latin. When praying with my family, we like to express prayer intentions before beginning (eg. "For so-and-so" or "For charity&...
7 votes
1 answer
112 views

To think of someone

I have been trying to translate this English phrase into Latin properly, and I started to check it in some resources. In this text it goes: "..., cum de tuis cogitas,...". And I have no idea ...
4 votes
1 answer
309 views

How does one translate "a fighting thing" and "a running away thing"?

In the same way "a thinking thing" is translated into Latin to res cogitans, how would you translate in Latin "a fighting thing" and "a running away thing"?
0 votes
0 answers
76 views

Is there a Simple Latin?

For english, a simple version of the language, called Simple English has been defined — an english-based controlled language — as an aid to teaching english to non-native speakers. Has it ever been an ...
12 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is the imperative of velle?

The conjugation tables of irregular Latin verbs that I have seen do not give any imperative forms for the verb velle. The verb nolle has the imperative forms noli and nolite, and they are fairly ...
10 votes
4 answers
340 views

Are there minimal pairs between the acute and circumflex accent?

Ancient Greek had two (*) different types of accent on long vowels: the "circumflex" accent indicates high tone on the first mora, and the "acute" accent indicates high tone on the second. (Short ...
11 votes
3 answers
445 views

The opposing meanings of the word donec?

I saw that "donec" might mean: "as long as", but it also can mean "till". In a sense those are opposing meanings. let's consider this example: I'm happy as long as there is daylight outside I'm ...
3 votes
0 answers
45 views

Are there different words for an excerpt and its location in Latin?

In Latin, locus can be the passage of a text (e.g. Cicero says he is going to translate a passage in one of his speeches and uses locus if I remember correctly) but it can also be the location of the ...
8 votes
1 answer
194 views

What was the classic term for "damnatio memoriae"?

The Wikipedia article on the subject notes that the term damnatio memoriae, referring to the relegation of a person's name to oblivion, as if they never existed, is a neo-Latin expression first ...
4 votes
1 answer
671 views

What does the word "adidum" mean?

In a book in Latin, I found the sentence "Adidum vina" — Something (?) the wines. What does "adidum" mean?
4 votes
2 answers
203 views

Is the Latin word verenda a noun? If so, which lexical root it has?

Is the Latin word verenda a noun? If so, which lexical root does it have? Deu.25:11: "Si habuerint inter se jurgium viri duo, et unus contra alterum rixari coeperit, volensque uxor alterius ...
2 votes
0 answers
52 views

How would you translate "Mentalist" into Latin?

How would mentalist be translated into Latin? There is some debate about what constitutes mentalism, but to me I would summarize as the use of psychology, cold reading, skilled intuition, and careful ...
8 votes
2 answers
534 views

How would you translate "rank" or "level" to Latin?

In English, we can talk about people or things as being at a certain level or rank. For example, in gaming systems, you might have a character or ability that is level 10, or level 20, etc. What would ...

1
2 3 4 5
16