Questions tagged [vocabulary]

This tag is for questions concerning the meaning and usage of individual words or a few words in conjunction with each other.

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14
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3answers
3k views

Origins of the word “hodie”

Hodie is a Latin adverb meaning "today" or "at the present time". I am rather curious as to how this word developed. Was it originally a compound of hōc and diē, which would be translated as "on this ...
25
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4answers
5k views

ATM in Vatican City: “Inserito scidulam quaeso ut faciundam cognoscas rationem”

The automated teller machines in Vatican City show this screen when awaiting a card: Could someone, quaeso, break this down word by word? There are a number of things here that I find puzzling or ...
5
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1answer
93 views

Is *rīcus attested?

The word for "rich" in most Romance languages looks something like, well, "rich". It declines like a first/second declension adjective, and seems to go back to Germanic *rīkijaz (possibly through ...
8
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3answers
514 views

How would I talk about supernatural “possession”?

Many stories, both ancient and modern, concern "possession": a supernatural entity of some sort takes over a human or animal body and controls it. Is there a Classical Latin word for this phenomenon? ...
6
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2answers
753 views

Why -ώς in αἰδώς?

The word αἰδώς means awe, shame, or respect. There are related words such as αἰδοῖος. I feel like I ought to be training my brain to recognize inflections in order to get clues as to meaning, but as ...
2
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1answer
61 views

Determining the etymology of words in Latin

I am interested in the etymology of words in Latin. Is there a resource available that could help me determine if a word is specifically from Old, New or Vulgar Latin etc. according to a time it is ...
5
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1answer
98 views

What is the present participle of fio?

Horace wrote the line brevis esse laboro, obscurus fio in De Arte Poetica Liber. I want to use the latter half of the phrase, obscurus fio, as a song title but I'd like it to be in the form of I am ...
3
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1answer
46 views

What is “cum supportatione”?

In Epistolae obscurorum virorum, letter 3: 'Mus miser est antro qui solum clauditur uno.’ Sic etiam possum dicere de me cum supportatione, venerabilis vir, quia essem pauper si haberem tantum unum ...
4
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1answer
133 views

Gen 1:28 only animals that move or all living beings?

The book of Genesis, 1:28 reads: Crescite et multiplicamini et replete terram et subicite eam et dominamini piscibus maris et volatilibus caeli et universis animantibus, quae moventur super terram ...
7
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3answers
869 views

Translate “Those in Whom Deserts Hide” into Classical Latin

I am translating the phrase Those in Whom Deserts Hide, which was inspired by a line in the poem Dionysian Dithyrambs by Nietzsche ("The desert grows: woe to him in whom deserts hide"). This ...
3
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1answer
77 views

How do you say something is “in flux” in Classical Latin?

In English we have in flux, which you can use to say that something is in a state of change. How do you use an adjective that way in Latin? Could you use fluxus in ablative/accusative case with the ...
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4answers
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How to translate “sexy”?

How would one translate “sexy” into Latin? In particular, I’m looking for a word or phrase that has a similar “slangy” feel to the English version. I’ve considered a few possibilities: Catullus 10 ...
5
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3answers
183 views

What is the best Greek word for a thrown knife?

In the Netflix show The Umbrella Academy, one character has a limited form of telekinesis: he can manipulate the movement of knives that he throws. If I wanted to give this ability a pretentious Greek ...
8
votes
3answers
243 views

Cibus sanus — healthy food?

The Duolingo Latin course uses sanus as "healthy" in connection with meals. A healthy lunch would be prandium sanum according to the course. But I always thought that sanus is only refers to ...
7
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1answer
1k views

Is this word “manuducant” a typo or an obscure word?

I have the following sentence from Euler's De Serie Lambertina (I've already asked half a dozen questions about this paper), and one of the words manuducant (manvdvcant), shown in the snippet below, ...
6
votes
2answers
364 views

Act 1, Act 2, … in a play, in Greek

In an ancient Greek play, what word would we use to refer to the different acts? Μέρος? Λόγος? Woodhouse doesn't seem to have anything relevant under the noun "act."
8
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2answers
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The best way to say Sinners

I'd like to create an aesthetic with the phrase "Remember that you must die, sinners" - targeted at the viewers. I know the first part is memento mori, but what is the best translation of &...
6
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2answers
153 views

What does causa procurans mean?

What is the definition of the expression causa procurans, and who may have been the originator of the term? I found this expression used by a number of people, but I haven't been able to find it ...
4
votes
2answers
425 views

Tables of Greek expressions for time, place, and logic

I'm trying to build my vocabulary in koine using flashcards, and so far have had pretty good success attaining a decent level of reading fluency, e.g., I can get through the first couple of chapters ...
5
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1answer
87 views

Proper way to say “Traveler's Writ/Licence/Certificate”

I am looking for more or less the 'proper' (or any good approximation) way to translate a "Traveler's Writ," as in a certificate or license given to a traveler that allows him legal access to an area. ...
3
votes
1answer
42 views

Create new word: super + portare

I want to create a new word by analogy to "support" with the prefix super-. According to Google the modern English word "support" comes from Latin supportare and is composed of sub-...
3
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1answer
112 views

What is the word for knowledge in Greek?

I read that there are two version depending on intrinsic value. So that it is either intellectual knowledge or divine knowledge, knowledge from within. And is there a difference between Ancient Greek ...
4
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2answers
97 views

Is “evidenter” the correct translation for “obviously!”?

I've searched the forum but found no answer to my question. How would one say obviously in Latin? As in answering a question with a "it's option b, obviously!" Online dictionaries have given ...
7
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1answer
355 views

In what sense is a university (universitas) a whole?

The word for a university in many languages (not Finnish though!) comes from the Latin word universitas. The word appears to mean roughly "the whole", but one might also analyze it along the ...
4
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0answers
52 views

Names for digits or numbers

How would you say "I write zeroes and ones" or "I need a fiver" or "the number seven" in Latin? There are a couple of cases where in some languages one uses instead of a ...
9
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2answers
1k views

How to say “fit” in Latin?

The English word "fit" has a number of different uses, and that makes searching difficult. I am looking for a verb or phrase to be used in a sentence like this: The souvenir does not fit in ...
25
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3answers
8k views

What is bullshit in Latin?

If a statement is blatantly wrong or shows lack of interest in the truth, one can call it bullshit in English. But how about Latin? Is there something more strong and colorful than falsus? I am not ...
5
votes
1answer
94 views

Seize your future

What would "Seize your future/the future" be in Latin? I've got Carpe futurum, but my latin is quite poor. I want to use it as a motto for an educational company. I want to use it as it ...
1
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1answer
51 views

Natural or unflavoured products

There are a number of different flavours of, say, yogurts, and one of them is plain, without any added flavours besides what is needed to make the yogurt. In English this flavour seems to be often ...
11
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3answers
496 views

Where does Pliny, or any ancient author, write about a stilus plumbeus?

Researching the history of the pencil the German speaking web is full of quotes that attribute to Pliny the mentioning of a stilus plumbeus as the historical and etymological source for the word ...
6
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1answer
211 views

Why did Romans think of novissimus as last?

In the letter of Plinius to Tacitus about his and his mother's flight, there is the following sentence: multi ad deos manus tollere, plures usquam iam deos ullos aeternamque illam et novissimam ...
2
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1answer
66 views

Translation Request, English to Latin

How can I translate this sentence to Latin, "Man in the palace! Remember death, live with fear of death. Leave us alone." I translate like that but... I don't know, I guess, I did a mistake. ...
1
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1answer
334 views

Mysterious word for “expert” in an Italian anthology's version of Sappho LP 21

In this Italian anthology, LP 21 l. 2 (the first line where the papyrus has letters) is read as containing επαβολησ (and perhaps vestigia around it). The first word in the translation is "esperta", ...
4
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1answer
86 views

What is a street sign in Latin?

It recently occurred to me that I don't know what to call a street sign in Latin. I know that a general word for "sign" is signum, but the dictionaries I consulted do not specify whether it ...
2
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1answer
45 views

Ubi jus ibi remedium

I am trying to make sense of the phrase ubi jus ibi remedium. It seems incomplete, and I feel I should add two verbs and something to separate the two sentences, for example: Ubi jus est, ibi est ...
4
votes
2answers
251 views

About supplemented word ὀλόφῳ in a fusion of Lobel-Page fragments from an Italian Sappho anthology

This Italian Sappho anthology, on p. 57-58, has a fusion of several Lobel-Page fragments (cfr this question of mine), among which is 67(a). In l. 3 of that fragment, which is l. 16 of the fusion, the ...
4
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1answer
197 views

Two kinds of falling

The English verb "fall", when the subject is a human, has two main kinds of literal1 meaning as far as I can tell: A change of position: Moving suddenly from higher elevation to lower. (The ...
5
votes
1answer
303 views

'i have never made' in latin

I've tried to search for this phrase, but I haven't found an answer. I looked it up on google translate and it says 'nunquam fecit.' I don't think it's correct.
8
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1answer
1k views

How to emphasize adjectives?

In English, and most modern European languages, we have one single word, "very," which is accepted as the regular way to make an adjective more extreme. Is there a common way to do this in Latin? Ways ...
5
votes
1answer
57 views

What is the meaning of “positive acceptus” in Gauss' Disquisitiones Arithmeticae §131?

From Gauss' Disquisitiones Arithmeticae §131: Sī p est numerus prīmus fōrmae 4n+1, erit +p, sī vērō p fōrmae 4n+3, erit -p residuum vel nōn-residuum cuiusvīs numerī prīmī quī positīvē acceptus ipsīus ...
5
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2answers
155 views

Aurora Natalis or Aurora Natalicus?

I have practically no experience with Latin, but from what I understand Aurora Borealis roughly means northern dawn, and Aurora Australis roughly means southern dawn. What would be the equivalent way ...
3
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2answers
421 views

Does “aurea” have the second meaning?

Does "aurea" have the second meaning? According to Latin Word Study Tool, aurea doesn't mean "the bridle of a horse" in the following context in my opinion: "trecenta quoque ...
5
votes
4answers
687 views

Translate “Eat, Drink, and be merry” to Latin

In the spirit of the holidays, I was thinking about how you would say Eat! Drink! Be Merry! in Latin (or written as Eat, drink, and be merry!). There are multiple words for each, but I'm not sure ...
5
votes
2answers
136 views

How would one say “Please let me do X thing”

Was wondering how one would say "Please let me do X thing" e.g. "Please let me love/win/see" Would you use some sort of impersonal construction, or would one use "permitto&...
4
votes
1answer
167 views

translation for Strength, love and courage to Latin

I would like to engrave a piece in Latin for my teenage son with our “family motto.” The motto is strength, love and courage. He is studying Latin and I want to be sure the word choice is accurate. ...
10
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1answer
179 views

Lonely vs. alone

A person is alone when there are no other people around. A person is lonely when the presence of other people is missed. Neither implies the other; you can be lonely but not alone or alone but not ...
7
votes
1answer
138 views

Composition of a word ἡμιόλιος

The Ancient Greek word ἡμιόλιος means literally "one and a half", referring to the ratio 3:2 and the interval of a perfect fifth in music. I wonder how this word is composed of: is it ἡμι- (...
13
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6answers
555 views

“Mind the gap!”

I am currently in London, and the Underground has been kind enough to repeat this warning numerous times: Please mind the gap between the train and the platform! Having heard the same phrase over ...
5
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2answers
197 views

Comparing words for resistance

The English word "resistance" is obviously etymologically related to resistentia, and I would like to understand how good of a translation resistentia. To be clear, I mean resistance in the sense of a ...
6
votes
1answer
199 views

<quality> even for being a <noun>

Salvēte omnēs, hocc erit mihi prīmum rogātum hāc in sēde. Haud dūdum vīdī quendam hominem scīscitārī, quōmodo posset Latīnē dīcī "he has a long tail, even for a cat". Ad quod rogātum cum respondēre ...

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