Questions tagged [verbs]

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5
votes
1answer
162 views

Does “Sum faber” necessarily mean “I am a craftsman,” or can it mean “My name is Faber”?

I understand that a legitimate, though perhaps uncommon, way to introduce oneself in Latin is: [Ego] sum Iulius I also know that in Latin, as in English, people's names are often connected to ...
8
votes
2answers
267 views

Latin for English “has been” + adjective?

I'm trying to say in Latin, "Our garden has been full of junk for three years" and I can't figure out what tense to put the verb in. In English, "has been" expresses present tense with perfective ...
7
votes
1answer
120 views

What is the purpose of repeating prepositions?

In Lingua Latina per se illustrata, chapter 7, there are several examples of phrases where a compound verb, using a preposition as a prefix, is used in conjunction with a lone preposition: Quid ...
6
votes
2answers
138 views

Can the verb auxiliari take an accusative object?

The verb auxiliari is used with dative to indicate the entity that benefits from the help. For example, tibi auxilior means "I help you". Can use an accusative object to express how the help is given? ...
4
votes
1answer
847 views

What is a “second-person singular future active indicative” verb?

Does it means a verb that should be used with a subject that is second-person and singular? What does "future active indicative" mean? For example, I know "acuēs" roughly means "sharpen", but what's ...
8
votes
2answers
642 views

How do you translate the phrase “regnum obtinuerat”?

I'm reading Jason and the Argonauts from Fabulae Faciles, and I come across this phrase really often. I'll provide an example. Erant olim in Thessalia duo fratres, quorum alter Aeson, Pelias alter ...
8
votes
1answer
788 views

How many distinct forms does a typical Latin verb have?

I thought I read somewhere that Latin verbs usually have about 150 different endings, but when I looked over a paradigm table I only found around 90. How many distinct forms do you need to memorize, ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

Three forms of a Latin verb?

Why do Latin to English dictionaries list three forms of a Latin verb? I've seen this other places like grammar books too. For example: sedeō, sēdī, sessum: to sit. There's no Latin keyboard for ...
7
votes
3answers
193 views

Can I contract with an irregular perfect stem in v?

I know that if I have a regular first conjugation verb, I can contract some forms. For example, amavisti and amaverunt can become amasti and amarunt, and I have come across such forms repeatedly. Can ...
11
votes
1answer
727 views

What are the key differences between the main Latin verbs meaning “to kill”?

I'm a student and my class laughs when we learn a new verb for "to kill". Just to list some of them: necare interficere extinguere There are of course many others. What are the key differences ...
19
votes
4answers
393 views

Did the Romans derive verbs from names?

I know the Romans did derive verbs from nouns (laudare, finire, lucere…), but did they ever derive verbs from names? The Greeks did, for example forming homerizein (ὁμηρίζ&...
11
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2answers
2k views

Which verb for drinking is least related to alcohol?

In English, like in many other languages, "to drink" often means "to drink alcohol". I dislike this connotation, and I would like to be able to talk about drinking with minimal alcoholic connotations. ...
8
votes
2answers
855 views

How do you parse “futurum est” in Matthew 2:13?

I'm a little confused about a verse in Matthew 2 of the Vulgate Bible. Futurum est enim ut Herodes quærat puerum ad perdendum eum. (Matthew 2:13) Douay-Rheims translates this as, "For it will ...
7
votes
1answer
554 views

Perfect passive forms like “amatus fuit”

The normal way of forming the perfect passive system is: perfect passive participle + a form from the present system of sum, e.g. amatus est, amatus erat, amatus sit, amatus esset. But one ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

What are the future imperatives of sum?

I have a book: 501 Latin Verbs: fully conjugated. In the conjugations for the verb sum, it leaves out the future imperatives. Are there no future imperatives for sum? So how would, "You must be noun/...
9
votes
3answers
398 views

How can I tell if -ere is getting substituted for -erunt?

There's an alternate form of the third person plural perfect active indicative. Instead of, say, habuerunt, a poet might write habuere, to make the word fit with the meter, but that looks like the ...
15
votes
3answers
534 views

Was the plural future imperative ever used?

In Latin today, we ran across the word "esto", which our teacher told us is the future singular imperative of "sum, esse". When I half-jokingly asked what the plural was, he thought for a few seconds ...
13
votes
5answers
4k views

Why is there no future perfect subjunctive in Latin?

Why is there no future perfect subjunctive verb form in classical Latin? I can't think of a time it would be used, but I can think of an English translation: "if subject were to have verbed, then ...
17
votes
1answer
526 views

How can I say “undo” in Latin?

The question of how to express my username, Undo, in Latin recently came up in chat. As Ben Kovitz notes, Latin seems to lack the word 'defacio' or similar. How can I say my name, the verb "undo", in ...
8
votes
3answers
761 views

Instances of the future passive infinitive

Throughout my time studying Latin in school, one grammatical construction in particular has always intrigued me to an extent — the future passive infinitive (eg. amatum iri). Whenever it came up (...
9
votes
1answer
98 views

Technique to find first principal parts when later parts change spelling? E.g. find 'nanciscor' from 'nactus'

I am tutoring a friend who is preparing for a graduate school translation exam, of the "unseen passage, dictionary allowed, time limit imposed, be accurate" variety. We came across nacti in ...
13
votes
1answer
156 views

Can a verbum deponens go along with an accusativus?

In Plinius I encountered: "Confitentes iterum ac tertio interrogavi supplicium minatus" Is supplicium some sort of accusativus belonging to minatus, which comes from deponens minor? If a form is ...
17
votes
1answer
221 views

Can I passivize a verb with two objects with respect to either one?

If I have a transitive verb with one object, passivizing an active sentence is straightforward. For example, "te amo" becomes "(a me) amaris". But how to passivize a verb that has two objects? For ...
16
votes
2answers
143 views

What is the difference in meaning or nuance between 'premō' and 'imprimō' in the sense of 'I press'?

Wiktionary shows that both premō and imprimō can mean (among other things) "I press." Looking at the formation of the latter word, the prefix im-, can negate the root word. How this applies to this ...

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