Questions tagged [verbs]

Questions concerning verbs: words describing action.

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How things change in Latin

After having provided an answer to Draconis’ question ( Did Latin have any ergative verbs? ), I was wondering about the subtle meaning differences involved in triads like {aperit/se aperit/aperitur}, ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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Paradigm of (reduplicated) "fhefhaked"?

Do we have any reasonable speculations about a possible paradigm of archaic fhefhaked? I found an unreduplicated paradigm on Wikipedia, but I cannot judge its validity: 1st Sing. *fēkai 2nd Sing. ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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Why does "urgueo" exist as a variant of "urgeo"?

The rule I learned for the pronunciation of the digram "gu" before a vowel in Latin was /gw/ after "n", vs. g + vocalic u anywhere else. But I just discovered the exception urgueo /urgweoː/. This is a ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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Is "dante" a participle in Ps 103:28

What parts of the verb are dante and aperiente in Ps 103:28 (Vulgate)? dante te illis colligent aperiente te manum tuam omnia implebuntur bonitate. My guess is the ablative of the present participle (...
user558840's user avatar
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What is the best Latin counterpart for 'reach' or 'contact'?

In English you can use the verbs "reach" or "contact" to mean being in contact with someone without specifying the method. When you don't want to specify whether you are writing a ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
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Can a finite verb modify another verb as if it were a gerund? (De manibus delapsa arma ceciderunt)

How should we interpret the connection between delapsa and ceciderunt in the following: de manibus audacissimorum civium delapsa arma ipsa ceciderunt (Cic. De Officiis) Naturally I could not see ...
d_e's user avatar
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ante solem occasum vs. *ante diem adventum

The intransitive verbs that typically enter into constructions with perfect participles of the so-called "dominant" type are deponent: e.g., ante Ciceronem mortuum, post Ciceronem natum, etc....
Mitomino's user avatar
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Cur coniugationes systematis praesentis sunt tam dissimiles cum eae cum coniugationibus systematis perfecti comparentur?

TL;DR & the actual question For those who don't need an explanation of all verb endings and the ways in which they differ from each other, my question follows below. For those who might need a ...
Ethan Bierlein's user avatar
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What combinations of tenses appear in periphrasis?

Periphrastic verb forms, specifically a participle plus an auxiliary verb, are very common in English ("I am writing now"). They also appear in Latin and Ancient Greek and a number of Romance ...
Draconis's user avatar
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Homeric verbs that never take the augment

I've been making some recordings of grammar drills for Homeric Greek (1, 2), and have been wrestling with the question of how to deal with cases where the user is supposed to produce some Greek, but ...
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What would the perfect stem of 'apparere' be?

Lewis and Short only give present stem forms of the verb appărĕre, appărio. They say, quite rightly so, that it comes from ad+părĕre, and one would therefore expect the conjugation to be as that ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
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Verbal Adjective of Necessity vs. Possibility

Greek distinguishes between verbal adjectives ending in -τέος and verbal adjectives ending in -τός. The latter (according to Smyth) express either possibility or the perfect passive participle (e.g. '...
Michael's user avatar
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When and how did the distinction between the gerund and the gerundive develop?

The gerund and the gerundive look similar and have similar meanings, but they are still distinct as any Latin grammar will tell us. But how did classical Latin come to have these two close but ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes
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Latin verbs describing bodily sensing vs. intellectual sensing

For each of the 5 senses, does Latin have distinct verbs for the intellectual act that follows from the bodily act of sensation? For example: Bodily act of sensing Corresponding act of intellect to ...
Geremia's user avatar
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Did meminisse ever had a present tense?

The verb meminī, meminisse, *mementus ever have any sort of (morphologically) present tense? If not, why not? If so, at what point was it lost in Latin? Bonus points: if the present tense had ...
Draconis's user avatar
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Anticausative/Mediopassive constructions in perfect form?

I was wondering what is the correct analysis/interpretation of exstincta sunt in the following text from Cicero: quarum rerum recordatio et memoria si una cum illo occidisset, desiderium ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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1 vote
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Gerund vs infinitive

I'm currently reading Ad Alpes and came across the following sentence: "Nonne sunt qui putent earum volatu res futuras portendi?" Now, as I understand it the meaning of this sentence is: &...
William's user avatar
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On the (necessary or typical?) relationship between double accusative and causation

I was wondering if there is a syntactic/semantic generalization that can account for the so-called "double accusative" predicative frame in Latin (verbs with person & thing (docere ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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Is the Greek infinitive regular?

My general understanding of Greek verbs is that if you know the six principal parts, you should be able to infer all forms of the verb (although there may be complications such as contractions, the ...
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