Questions tagged [translation]

For questions regarding translating, either from or to Latin. N.B. Questions must show some effort!

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8
votes
1answer
756 views

Help with translating “For those about to die, we salute you” ?

I want to riff off the famous saying "those about to die salute you". According to wikipedia the original is: "Ave, Imperator, morituri te salutant" ("Hail, Emperor, those who are about to die ...
4
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1answer
114 views

Translating “Through Intellect, Strength” into Latin

Per Intellectum, Vis What would you fix? Trying to come up with a theme / catchphrase for a family event. I want to signify respect for education, the scientific method and observation.
5
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1answer
180 views

How to say, “Many are not one?” Pluribus non paribus unum?

How to say, "Many are not one?" Is it: pluribus non paribus unum?
5
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2answers
197 views

How do you translate “the principle of explosion” into Latin?

How to say "the principle of explosion"? Would it be principium crepitum? The principle of explosion usually is understood to mean ex contradictione sequitur quodlibet, yet I'm very curious as to how ...
8
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1answer
1k views

What would “I Discover” be in Latin?

I need the Latin for "I Discover" - as in "I learn new things, by gathering information about it and/or trying it myself (by trial and error)". I've looked for it in several online dictionaries, but ...
11
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4answers
774 views

How do I say that something will “probably” happen in Latin?

I was recently writing in Latin and had the misfortune of getting an English construction in my head that I had a difficult time fitting into a Latin thought pattern: I will probably be there soon. ...
6
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1answer
109 views

“Genius without verification/proof” in Latin

Is "Ingenium sine demonstratione" a proper translation of "Genius without verification/proof"? It's basically a German phrase ("Genie ohne Nachweis") that was used to describe Ludwig Wittgensteins ...
14
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2answers
483 views

“If and only if”

In mathematical literature "if and only if" (sometimes abbreviated as "iff"1) is a relatively common phrase. Saying "A if and only if B" means that A and B are equivalent logical statements. This is ...
4
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1answer
52 views

Eleatic arguments (argumenta Eleatica)?

I want to know how to say "Eleatic arguments" as well as how to say "Eleatistic arguments". Right now, all I can come up with for the former is "argumenta Eleatica", and I have no clue about the ...
10
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2answers
6k views

Translating “idiot”

What would be a good classical Latin word for "idiot"? The Latin word idiota seems to refer to an uneducated layman, whereas the English "idiot" means someone of low intelligence. That is, the Latin ...
4
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0answers
81 views

Translating “star” (actor, musician, or similar)

What would be a good Latin translation of a "star", a famous actor, musician or other such person? I am looking for a good translation for modern use, but of course an attested ancient choice of words ...
7
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1answer
2k views

What is “menu” in Latin?

What would be a good Latin word for "menu" in the sense of a list of foods and drinks in a restaurant? My dictionary suggests index ciborum, and another option would be to replace index with tabula. ...
7
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1answer
561 views

Modus Barbara, Modus Celarent, et Modus Darii: (Modi Barbara, Celarent, et Darii)?

Modus Barbara, Modus Celarent, and Modus Darii are names of valid syllogisms in the medieval taxonomy of valid syllogisms. I'm wondering how to say: "Moduses Barbara, Celarent, and Darii." As far as I'...
5
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5answers
220 views

Happily necessary condition for lamentable hypothetical result

How would you translate this famous English sentence into Latin? I don't think I've come across the Latin grammatical conventions to express this kind of causal relation between the protasis and ...
2
votes
1answer
259 views

What is a “roll call” in Latin?

I am looking for a word, verb or noun, to describe reading a list of names out loud to figure out who is present. The Finnish word is "nimenhuuto", and it seems that the English phrase seems to be "...
7
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2answers
124 views

How to translate “main”?

I am looking for a Latin adjective — or several adjectives if no single one is enough — meaning "main". I might want to talk about a main building or the main idea of a theory. The only ...
5
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3answers
230 views

How to translate “Rochester Catholic Schools” into Latin

I need a bit of help with translating the following phrase from English into Latin: Rochester Catholic Schools How would Rochester Catholic Schools be properly translated into Latin?
11
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1answer
419 views

In search of a Latin idiom expressing suspicion, i.e., a translation of “I smell a rat” or “something smells fishy”

Is there a Latin idiom, preferably one that was in currency in the classical period, that expresses the speaker's suspicion that something pertinent is being maliciously concealed from him? For ...
6
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2answers
281 views

Quomodo in Latinum vertitur “alternative facts”?

How would you translate "alternative facts" into Latin, in the sense used infamously today by Kellyanne Conway? My first thought is res ad libitum but that too strongly suggests making up facts willy-...
6
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2answers
95 views

Approaches to translating “without + verb”

I was recently doing a translation of a phrase like the following: You can see everything without blinking. Here was my briefly considered attempt: Omnia sine nictatione videre vales. I was ...
6
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4answers
489 views

How to say “as” emphatically?

Consider the sentence "Marcus spoke as a manager". Imagine that Marcus was speaking at a company event, and he gave his speech as a manager, not as a coworker — as a representative of the ...
8
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2answers
234 views

Translating “taller by a head”

In English one can write either of these to indicate a height difference: Marcus is taller than Gaius by a head. Marcus is a head taller than Gaius. I am looking for an idiomatic way to ...
10
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1answer
240 views

Is there a Latin construction for “she must be” as in “I bet she is”/“She probably is”?

Say my friend is supposed to meet me, but she's late, and I think it's because she was reading, I might say, "She must have been reading." Is there a way to express this in Latin other than something ...
5
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2answers
824 views

How do you say, “I want to leave the room”?

If you wanted to translate the sentence, "I want to leave the room", from English to Latin, how would you do it? I'm not sure which words to choose for "leave" and "room". I made a few guesses as to ...
7
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2answers
3k views

Expressing the relationship “his” in latin

So I have the following sentence which I have to translate into Latin: The farmer gives his daughter water. The parts which I found easy: Agricola ... aquam dat. I don't know how to express "his" ...
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2answers
909 views

Hogwarts Motto from J.K. Rowling's “Harry Potter” series

Hogwarts, the School of Witchcraft and Wizardry in the Harry Potter books, has the following Latin motto: Draco dormiens numquam titillandus. Most online sources translate this as "Never tickle a ...
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3answers
1k views

Phrase grammar, curae or curo

I have a phrase and I'm concerned with grammar. Which one would be more proper? et ego non curae or et ego non curo Phrase meaning would be "I don't care."
6
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1answer
68 views

Translating “Repurposes and depends on production of…”

I wish to translate: Repurposes and depends on production of... Word for word, the following represents my current effort: Redivivus ("Recycle" but not specifically "Recycles" as required.) OR ...
11
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1answer
13k views

Most accurate Latin word for “book” in this context

The English word "book" has many potential Latin translations, such as liber, monumentum, carta, codex, and volumen. If, in this context, the book refers to a textbook or collection of stories, what ...
9
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1answer
843 views

How to translate “the Force” from Star Wars?

In Star Wars movies — and other media — there is an important concept called the Force. It is a magical energy field surrounding everything and giving special abilities for those who ...
6
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1answer
185 views

“Us versus them” - opposite of “noster”?

Noster can mean "one of us" in a symbolic way; L&S mentions that noster eris "you will be one of us" was a set expression for welcoming a deserter into the army, for instance. The English ...
5
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5answers
3k views

Translate “Sharing is Caring” into Latin

I have been trying to find an accurate translation of something my grandmother always said: "Sharing is Caring" or "To Share is to Care", into Latin. However online translators seem very inconsistent ...
7
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2answers
183 views

“To be” and a commentator on Aquinas

Father David Burrell, a well-known philosopher and theologian who has written on Thomas Aquinas, has discussed Aquinas' view of God, or at least of what could or could not be properly said about God. ...
7
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1answer
962 views

How to write “knowledge to all” in classical latin?

How to write "knowledge to all" in Classical Latin? Google translate gave me "In omni scientia". But I also had "Omnes enim scientiae" or "Omnis enim scientia" and a scholar gave me "Scientia per ...
5
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2answers
580 views

Translating “machines” and “people”

What are the Latin words for machines and people? I want to use them as names of wireless networks. I am not sure how accurate Google translate is, but it suggests machinae and populo. Are those even ...
6
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1answer
163 views

Toilet paper orientation

Toilet paper orientation is the source of some amount of debate, and it turns out it even has a dedicated Wikipedia page. For reasons partly beyond my comprehension, I would like to describe this ...
8
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2answers
918 views

On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog

I would like to know whether the adage above could be translated into Latin to make it sound more profound. The user Sam K has suggested the following translation: In interneto, nemo scit te canem ...
4
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4answers
910 views

How to describe collaboration?

I am looking for ways to describe collaboration in Latin. My main interest is scientific collaboration, if the type matters. I would like to have both a verb "to collaborate" and a noun "collaboration"...
10
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3answers
271 views

For the sake of the plot

In my Sanskrit dictionary, the Latin phrase metri causa ("for the sake of the metre") is used to alert the reader to forms which may be used irregularly in order to fit the metre. For example, in the ...
6
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2answers
418 views

How does this phrase for most decorated sportsperson translate?

My secondary (middle and high) school has a trophy awarded to the most decorated sportsperson at sports day. From my vague memories, the trophy, and its subsequent winner, are called the Victor ...
5
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1answer
138 views

How to say “that can be arranged”?

The phrase "that can be arranged" can be useful, and I would like to know an idiomatic way to put it in Latin. This phrase could be a response to "can we meet tomorrow at ten?", "I'd like to eat ...
2
votes
1answer
146 views

Simple translation from Polish and English to Latin

I have totally no clue about Latin language, but I need translation for the title to my music project. The answer is not "Magnum Opus Dei". I would like to know what's in Latin: Polish - Wielkie ...
2
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0answers
592 views

Untranslated (but important) content in Latin? [closed]

I have renewed my self-studies of Latin and I have observed that the greatest effect (and motivation) of studies comes from trying to translate important texts from the foreign language to English or ...
8
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1answer
5k views

How to say 'Such is life'?

As an expression of the fact that much of life is beyond one's control, the English phrase 'Such is life.', or 'That's the way the cookie crumbles.', or, more vulgarly, 'Shit happens.' is common. How ...
4
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2answers
198 views

How do you say “You can't automatize a mess”?

I don't know if phrase translation requests are on-topic but I would really like to know is there's a way to convey this meaning in Latin: "You can't automatize a mess" or "Disorder cannot be ...
4
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1answer
649 views

Trying to translate “Best Man, True Friend, Bad Influence” into latin for an inscription

I'm trying to translate "Best Man - True Friend - Bad Influence" into Latin for a gift inscription for (unsurprisingly) my best man. So far I've got to "Optimum Vir - Verum Amicus - Malum Auctoritas." ...
7
votes
1answer
524 views

“Music and Beer” in Latin?

I need to create a family logo for the wedding of a Classics prof. I'd like the phrase to be "Music and Beer." I don't speak Latin and I'm getting strange results from Google translate depending on ...
5
votes
3answers
654 views

How to say “don't rock the boat” in Latin?

A friend is interested in conveying the sense of "don't rock the boat", but in Latin. Is there an equivalent saying in Latin, or a phrase which would convey the correct meaning?
12
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2answers
990 views

What's the correct way to say, in Latin, “creation within God” & “creation through God”?

A great swath of Christendom has, from as early as Augustinus Hipponensis, held that God created the universe ex nihilo, "from/ out of nothing." One of the motivations behind this has been to refute ...
7
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1answer
213 views

How to describe the SE voting system in Latin?

I would like to express the following ideas in Latin, for the purpose of describing this site: Through voting, the best answers rise to more visible positions at the top of the page. You can vote on ...