Questions tagged [translation]

For questions regarding translating, either from or to Latin. N.B. Questions must show some effort!

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14
votes
2answers
482 views

“If and only if”

In mathematical literature "if and only if" (sometimes abbreviated as "iff"1) is a relatively common phrase. Saying "A if and only if B" means that A and B are equivalent logical statements. This is ...
13
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2answers
277 views

Is there a Latin word for “respectively”?

I am looking at some English translations of Latin texts (direction which I think is important to highlight), and I'm not sure there is an equivalent word in Latin. Example 1: English: These ...
12
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2answers
986 views

What's the correct way to say, in Latin, “creation within God” & “creation through God”?

A great swath of Christendom has, from as early as Augustinus Hipponensis, held that God created the universe ex nihilo, "from/ out of nothing." One of the motivations behind this has been to refute ...
12
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2answers
393 views

General principles for translating non-Latin names into Latin

I am engaged in several translation projects on the side which often involve translating names that do not have a Roman equivalent. Certain names obviously come from or have obvious equivalents in ...
11
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4answers
773 views

How do I say that something will “probably” happen in Latin?

I was recently writing in Latin and had the misfortune of getting an English construction in my head that I had a difficult time fitting into a Latin thought pattern: I will probably be there soon. ...
11
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2answers
2k views

How to say “Luke, I am your father” in Latin?

I have found very diverse translations online: Luke, sum ipse patrem te Luca, pater tuus sum (or in a different order) Luke, ego patrem tuum sum My guess First, the Latin name Luke seems to be ...
11
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2answers
907 views

Hogwarts Motto from J.K. Rowling's “Harry Potter” series

Hogwarts, the School of Witchcraft and Wizardry in the Harry Potter books, has the following Latin motto: Draco dormiens numquam titillandus. Most online sources translate this as "Never tickle a ...
11
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1answer
419 views

In search of a Latin idiom expressing suspicion, i.e., a translation of “I smell a rat” or “something smells fishy”

Is there a Latin idiom, preferably one that was in currency in the classical period, that expresses the speaker's suspicion that something pertinent is being maliciously concealed from him? For ...
11
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1answer
13k views

Most accurate Latin word for “book” in this context

The English word "book" has many potential Latin translations, such as liber, monumentum, carta, codex, and volumen. If, in this context, the book refers to a textbook or collection of stories, what ...
11
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1answer
11k views

A correct latin translation of “By the power of truth, I, a mortal, have conquered the universe”

If you've read the V for Vendetta comics you may remember the quote "Vi veri vniversum vivus vici", which is supposed to mean "By the power of truth, I, a mortal [/ while living], have conquered the ...
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2answers
5k views

Happy Birthday and the accusative of exclamation

I'd like to say "Happy Birthday [to you]!" in Latin. I see two possibilities in Traupman's Conversational Latin: Fēlīx nātālis tibi! Fēlīcem nātālem [tibi exoptō]! The first is used in ...
10
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2answers
4k views

How do you say, “I will remember you”, or “I will never forget you,” in Latin?

I'm trying to write a letter to a friend in Latin, but I do not trust google translate. Help?
10
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3answers
873 views

Latin for clockwise/anticlockwise?

I'm trying to express 'clockwise' and 'anti-clockwise' in Latin, for which there are not likely to be classical precedents. Other languages generally seem to lack such brief and simple expressions : ...
10
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2answers
988 views

Help your friends, harm your enemies

"Help your friends, harm your enemies." I have heard this was a motto of Roman life and foreign policy. It is the definition of justice that begins the discussion in Plato's Republic. I believe that ...
10
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2answers
6k views

Translating “idiot”

What would be a good classical Latin word for "idiot"? The Latin word idiota seems to refer to an uneducated layman, whereas the English "idiot" means someone of low intelligence. That is, the Latin ...
10
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1answer
240 views

Is there a Latin construction for “she must be” as in “I bet she is”/“She probably is”?

Say my friend is supposed to meet me, but she's late, and I think it's because she was reading, I might say, "She must have been reading." Is there a way to express this in Latin other than something ...
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3answers
269 views

For the sake of the plot

In my Sanskrit dictionary, the Latin phrase metri causa ("for the sake of the metre") is used to alert the reader to forms which may be used irregularly in order to fit the metre. For example, in the ...
10
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1answer
356 views

Is there a latin word for 'plausible deniability'?

Plausible deniability in English is a condition in which a subject can safely and believably deny knowledge of any particular truth that may exist so as to shield the subject from any responsibility ...
9
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2answers
396 views

What is a runny nose?

I got a cold, and the most irritating symptom so far is a runny nose (rhinorrhea). But what is "runny nose" in Latin? It can be a noun, a verb, or any kind of way to describe the situation. I don't ...
9
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3answers
222 views

Speaking about an inflected word in Latin

In English, it is fairly common to write/say such sentences as the following: What is the possessive case of she? Should I use who or whom after man? What is the past participle of run? These kinds ...
9
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2answers
794 views

Translating a line of dialogue as though spoken a thousand years ago into Latin for a book

I am writing a book set in the present day with a very old character (thousands of years old). A modern day human asks him: "Do you speak Latin, like really speak Latin?" His response would be in ...
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2answers
1k views

I Can't See the Wood for the Trees

In a recent conversation, with Joonas (CHAT), about chess, the well-known English idiom "can't see the wood for the trees" came up. This phenomenon--whether caused by a lack of intuition; succumbing ...
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2answers
318 views

Classical Latin translations from extant Greek sources (or vice versa)

Are there any ancient works, or parts of ancient works, which we possess in both Greek and Latin -- i.e. both the original and a translation, made in antiquity, into the other language? I know there ...
9
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2answers
163 views

How should I translate “for” in this sentence?

This room is for talking about Latin[.SE]. Now, I've got most of this translated. The only thing I'm stumbling on is how to translate "for". I see two options, but neither is very good: "pro" -- It ...
9
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2answers
131 views

How to select dictionary translations

I was looking for a translation of the word "government" and I found in Pons dictionary (German–Latin) that it could be regnum or imperium. On the other hand, I also checked it in Collins ...
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2answers
570 views

How can I translate “Who cares for the carers?”

Trying for a pithy bit of Latin to echo "Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?" Carers as in doctors / nurses etc. Sorry, to clarify... My understanding / interpretation is that "who guards the guards?" ...
9
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1answer
121 views

What word did the Romans use to describe a hot, dry, sandy desert?

Did the Romans during the classical era have a word for a dry, hot, desert? There is desertum, but that is more "wilderness" than explicitly desert in the sense we might think of today. Another ...
9
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1answer
843 views

How to translate “the Force” from Star Wars?

In Star Wars movies — and other media — there is an important concept called the Force. It is a magical energy field surrounding everything and giving special abilities for those who ...
9
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1answer
160 views

Translating “something leads to something”

How can I translate sentences like "poverty leads to hunger" to Latin? There are several possible verbs for leading, and my first choice is ducere, but I am not sure if it can be used in this sense. ...
8
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1answer
864 views

Why was ante tribus translated as “fifteen years ago”?

In an answer I posted here, I provided someone else's translation which translated ante tribus as "fifteen years ago". The translation provided in the question also translated tribus the same way: ...
8
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2answers
121 views

“How does/can one …” translation to Latin

How does one translate to Latin sentences like: How does one do that? One could try but he would fail. Can one do this? I.e. sentences using one as subject, where particular subject is not really ...
8
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2answers
918 views

On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog

I would like to know whether the adage above could be translated into Latin to make it sound more profound. The user Sam K has suggested the following translation: In interneto, nemo scit te canem ...
8
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3answers
208 views

How to translate phrases using “prospectus”

I want to translate two phrases: The view [with the meaning of "focus"] to all. I'm thinking: prospectus omnium And the opposite: The view to [only] the strong ones. I think prospectus ...
8
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2answers
234 views

Translating “taller by a head”

In English one can write either of these to indicate a height difference: Marcus is taller than Gaius by a head. Marcus is a head taller than Gaius. I am looking for an idiomatic way to ...
8
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2answers
2k views

Translating “fake news” in Latin

For this trending modern (or rather contemporary idiom), I have two possible translations, but am not sure which one better suits the specificity of Latin: audītiōnēs falsae (or falsae ...
8
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1answer
5k views

How to say 'Such is life'?

As an expression of the fact that much of life is beyond one's control, the English phrase 'Such is life.', or 'That's the way the cookie crumbles.', or, more vulgarly, 'Shit happens.' is common. How ...
8
votes
1answer
1k views

What would “I Discover” be in Latin?

I need the Latin for "I Discover" - as in "I learn new things, by gathering information about it and/or trying it myself (by trial and error)". I've looked for it in several online dictionaries, but ...
8
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1answer
754 views

Help with translating “For those about to die, we salute you” ?

I want to riff off the famous saying "those about to die salute you". According to wikipedia the original is: "Ave, Imperator, morituri te salutant" ("Hail, Emperor, those who are about to die ...
8
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1answer
196 views

How complex a motion event can be in Classical Latin

How natural would you judge the translation of the following English sentence into Latin? He still wandered on, out of the little high valley, over its edge, and down the slopes beyond. 'Ulterius ...
7
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6answers
1k views

How to say 'striped' in Latin

I'm looking for a way to describe striped cloth — that is, with regular stripes all over, or like the stripes on the flag of the USA. I'm well aware of the stripe on a toga, angusticlavus, etc. But ...
7
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3answers
1k views

Phrase grammar, curae or curo

I have a phrase and I'm concerned with grammar. Which one would be more proper? et ego non curae or et ego non curo Phrase meaning would be "I don't care."
7
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2answers
19k views

Don't let the bastards grind you down

The intertubes are awash with grammatically incorrect "translations" of the phrase "don't let the bastards grind you down" (please pardon my French :-) Can someone please provide a correct and ...
7
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2answers
778 views

What is the meaning of “the new darkness” in Latin?

I am looking for a Latin phrase for The new darkness as in the arising of a negative political movement, a "new" darkness. The best I can find is tenebrae ex hodiernae as if "born ...
7
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2answers
179 views

Translating “We are her sword” into Latin

I'm trying to translate a sentence "We are her sword". It's supposed to be a motto for a warriors' guild under leadership of a female elf warrior in our tabletop RPG game. Other than the obvious ...
7
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4answers
605 views

Looking for the proper Latin phrasing of “Man's defender”

I was looking for the proper way to convey the idea of someone being a defender of people's rights,freedoms, and safety. In this context "Man" would be the same as "mankind" or "people." Maybe "...
7
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3answers
209 views

How would you translate “Not a second wasted”?

In the sense of "every second employed productively" as a motto, so brevity is important. It's a little tongue-in-cheek. I don't mean something like "every second between now and then is important". ...
7
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2answers
124 views

How to translate “main”?

I am looking for a Latin adjective — or several adjectives if no single one is enough — meaning "main". I might want to talk about a main building or the main idea of a theory. The only ...
7
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2answers
3k views

Expressing the relationship “his” in latin

So I have the following sentence which I have to translate into Latin: The farmer gives his daughter water. The parts which I found easy: Agricola ... aquam dat. I don't know how to express "his" ...
7
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2answers
617 views

Is this translation of “new mind/attitude” correct?

I've been trying to find a proper translation for a phrase that means something like "a new mind" or "a new attitude", etc. I would like to use it as an inspiration for a company-name. The words that ...
7
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3answers
255 views

Can one recreate the ambiguity of the (incorrect) sentence “You can learn writing.” in Latin?

It seems (to me at least) that with regard to the English sentence You can learn writing. the following is true: Strictly speaking, the sentence is grammatically incorrect w.r.t. standard modern ...

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