Questions tagged [translation-explanation]

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Using perfect participle as perfect active participle

Is perfect participle, in spite of the general notion, used both as perfect passive participle and perfect active participle? Spinoza, Ethics, De Dei, Propositio 15, Scholium: nam omnes qui ...
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62 views

The Nominative Case Uses

Spinoza writes in the last passage of Ethics: Cum contra sapiens, quatenus ut talis consideratur, vix animo movetur, sed sui et Dei et rerum aeterna quadam necessitate conscius nunquam esse desinit,...
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272 views

Translation of the Sator Square

The wikipedia page on the Sator Square (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sator_Square) says that the sentence "SATOR AREPO TENET OPERA ROTAS" is a grammatical sentence and translates it as "The farmer ...
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4answers
82 views

Ethics of Spinoza - Translation of “sit” and “satis”

Spinoza's ethics, On the God, Proposition 8, Scholium 2: ut satis attendenti sit manifestum 4 translations of this sentence: White: as is evident to any one who pays a little attention ...
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1answer
158 views

Can “nemo” be an adjective?

I subscribe to a "Latin word of the day" email, which sends me a random vocabulary word and an example sentence every day. Last night's email had this: pecco, to sin. Nemo accusator caret culpa; ...
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69 views

Cum = When (Imperfect Subjunctive)

North & Hillard Ex 196: the following is to be translated into Latin: "He had almost reached the top of the alps, when some old men came to him in the guise of envoys..." Ans: " nam ad summas ...
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1answer
52 views

Lost and Confused

In North & Hillard Ex. 195 the following is to be translated into Latin: "All order thus being lost, Nicias surrendered at discretion. He and Demosthenes, being condemned to death, died by poison."...
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5answers
183 views

How does one “imitate into everything”?

"Good King Wenceslas" is a classic Christmas song, but its melody was taken from an older song: "Tempus Adest Floridum", from the Finnish carol book Piae Cantiones ("Pious Songs"). The first few ...
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144 views

Reflexive Pronouns

North & Hillard; Ex. 195: the following is to be translated into Latin: "But, since his men had found no water to drink for many hours, they could not be restrained from rushing into the water, ...
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2answers
185 views

“Malo” in Motto Maelstrom

The motto for Concordia University Saint Paul (MN) reads: "In litteris proficere volo, malo diligere Jesum." The CSP website, magazine (Spring 2009), and various internet sources offer these ...
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63 views

Present or imperfect subjunctive in this translation exercise?

In North & Hillard; Ex 191, Q10: the student is required to translate: "He refused to fight until reinforcements came." An awkward one: the student has to remember to use "negavit" (he denied ...
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223 views

N & H Waxing Poetry: Why is “clam deductus est” used to translate “was led aside”?

In North & Hillard, Ex. 191, q. 3, the following English sentence needs to be translated into Latin: While the conspirators gathered round Caesar, Antonius was led aside by Trebonius. The ...
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449 views

Arx celebris fontibus

I bought yesterday a bottled mineral water, of the Harrogate brand, which label states: Harrogate's motto 'Arx celebris fontibus' translates as 'a citadel famous for its springs'. (this is the ...
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275 views

habitabat = dwelt?

Estne hic error translationis? Genesis 25:11 (Vulgata) dicit: et post obitum illius benedixit Deus Isaac filio eius qui habitabat iuxta puteum nomine Viventis et videntis. Anglice autem (Douay ...
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1answer
53 views

Say One Thing, Do another

Happy New Year. Now it's back to work on the Roman frontier. North & Hillard Ex. 218: An Indian Chief was taken prisoner by the Spaniards, and because he was a man of influence among the ...
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1answer
162 views

What is the difference between Libera and Libra?

I noticed a company's name Libratone emphasizing that their company name meant "set sound free." "LIBRA•TONE Our mission is in our name; Libratone – set sound free." Does Libera work as well here?...
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447 views

Why is “et sine ipso factum est nihil quod factum est” translated into past tense?

I'm a beginner and noticing "est" a present tense verb, being translated in dozens of resources as "was." Why? et sine ipso factum est nihil quod factum est = and without him nothing was made that ...
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1answer
82 views

Does this translate to “son in law”?

I have a translation for the following Latin text "Rex, ne speraveris generum mortali stirpe creatum, ..." that is as follows "King, do not hope for a son in law born as a mortal.". Is this ...
3
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37 views

Appropinquaretur

The rarely observed imperfect-subjunctive-passive creates a knotty problem. North & Hillard, Ex215: "Had we only kept to the main road, we should already be approaching the city." This is an ...
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75 views

Future-Perfect?

In North & Hillard, Ex 215, the following sentence: There can be little doubt that the guides, whether through treachery or ignorance, were mainly responsible for the disaster. is translated ...
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1answer
50 views

Parsing pro rata temporis

Recently when reading some material related to research grants, I came across the Latin phrase pro rata temporis in English text. It was easy enough to understand in the context. For example, a 600&...
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1answer
244 views

Fore or not Fore?

North & Hillard Ex. 230 includes the line: "By his advice the confederates bound themselves to resist to the death,". This, translated, in the Answer Book, as: "euis autem consilio socii se ...
5
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1answer
145 views

Why add “ei” to a sentence with “imperare” and “parere”?

In North & Hillard, Ex. 20, Q. 2, the student is invited to translate this sentence into Latin: Those who wish to command ought to learn to obey. I gave this translation: qui imperare volunt ...
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3answers
109 views

Two possible translations of a hymn: which is most likely right?

I came across this catholic hymn, whose text can be found in various versions online, and I found the following: Jesu, rex admirabilis, Et triumphator nobilis, Dulcedo ineffabilis, Totus ...
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2answers
3k views

Why *In medias res* and not *In media res*?

Wikipedia gives literal translation as: Into the middle of things. As far as I am aware into – in takes accusative. Plural accusative of medium seems to be media, not medias Even if I am ...
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2answers
753 views

Is the sentence “omnis res est” (“every thing is”) grammatical?

Is the sentence omnis res est ("every thing is") grammatical? Likewise, are sentences like aliqua res est and nulla res est grammatical?
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159 views

Why is the Latin title of “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” so verbose?

Terence Tunberg's translation of Dr. Seuss's How the Grinch Stole Christmas has a rather prolix title: Quomodo Invidiosulus Nomine Grinchus Christi Natalem Abrogaverit whose literal translation is:...
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342 views

Why “a man” instead of “to a man” in this translation?

Cornēliō, virō magnae sapientiae, dabō pulchrum librum novum is rendered into English as "To Cornelius, a man of great wisdom, I will give this fine new book" on this page of Latin translation ...
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166 views

Should motum be translated as emotions?

Calvin's commentary on Romans 1:18 (Latin, English translation by MacKenzie): Ira, ἀνθρωποπαθῶς, more Scripturae pro ultione Dei: quia Deus puniens, prae se fert (nostra opinione) irascentis faciem....
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216 views

How to translate these few lines? Met. 1.94–96

I came across a passage that is quite difficult to understand. Unlike most passages that I ask about, it is hard for me to make an attempt. nondum caesa suis, peregrinum ut viseret orbem, ...
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343 views

“Esto mihi in rupem praesidii et in domum munitam…”

I have a question about a translation of the phrase mentioned in the title, which comes from Psalm 30 (31) as it appears in "The Office of Compline, Latin and English" from the Saint Louis Antiphonary ...
5
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120 views

What does “suscipies et enutries omnes” mean in Augustine?

I'm studying Augustine's Sermon 46, "De Pastoribus," largely via translations into Spanish and English. There are a number of places where my English source and my Spanish source disagree, but ...
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2k views

Dominus illuminatio mea

I am trying to understand this expression. According to Wikipedia, it is translated as "The Lord is my light". Before reading this article, I thought this meant "Lord illuminate me", perhaps in ...
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1answer
407 views

Is the Spanish translation of the “Exultet” chant literal?

I am reading the Exultet, an ancient Christian chant. The first two lines are: Exultet iam angelica turba caelorum, exultent divina mysteria In the Spanish translation, these two lines are: ...
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1answer
298 views

How does “recte admones” mean “you do well to remind me”?

When reading this question's accepted answer about phrases for forgetting, I saw the phrase recte admones translated as "you do well to remind me". But, doesn't that mean "you remind directly"? I don'...
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144 views

Do singular nouns connected by “and” require a plural verb? (Greek)

I'm translating another sentence from Plato's Republic, and I'm a little confused about why ἐδόθη (3rd sg aorist passive indicative) is not plural. μουσικὴ μὴν ἐκείνοις γε καὶ γυμναστικὴ ἐδόθη. ...
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508 views

cum/tum and the Latin version of Herodotus

I've started reading Johann Schweighäuser's 1822 translation into Latin of Herodotus' Histories, and already the first sentence is giving me some trouble. The Greek, which I can puzzle my way through ...
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1answer
90 views

Having problem translating these two sentences

I had trouble understanding a two-part translation exercise. First part: Cui Galba agricola fabulam novam narrat? Answer: To whom does Galba, the farmer, tell the new story? How was I supposed ...
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487 views

'…quo plus…, eo plus … ' translation?

Here is a really complicated sentence, I am trying to understand how to translate it: Nam cum posse existere potentia sit, sequitur quo plus realitatis alicujus rei naturæ competit eo plus virium a ...
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165 views

Translation: «impulsi sunt et ipsi Christi amore»

I’ve yet another question on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC). (I did find another instance of the gerundive—I believe with a preceding ad indicating purpose—and Cerebrus’ instruction ...
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320 views

'idem hercle esset' meaning?

What could be the meaning of hercle in this context? Si quis ergo diceret se claram et distinctam hoc est veram ideam substantiæ habere et nihilominus dubitare num talis substantia existat, idem ...
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688 views

'Unde' and 'fit ut' meaning in this context

I would like to know how to understand unde in the last sentence: SCHOLIUM II: Non dubito quin omnibus qui de rebus confuse judicant nec res per primas suas causas noscere consueverunt, difficile ...
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5k views

Ars gratia artis

I would like to know the meaning of the following Latin expression, as well as a grammatical analysis of the individual words in this context: ARS GRATIA ARTIS as it appears in the following logo ...
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220 views

Use of the gerund in the Vulgate bible

I was reading Luke 10:25 in the Vulgate bible, trying my best to translate as literally as possible. But I found it hard to translate the question that the expert of law (legisperitus) poses. (...
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229 views

“Stantes erant pedes nostri…”

Another little puzzle inside Little Office of the BVM, Baronius Press, which is based upon the Gallican Psalter. Psalm cxxi has: Stantes erant pedes nostri, in atriis tuis, Jerusalem. Which it ...
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1answer
147 views

“omniaque perpeti ipsa” in De Finibus

In De Finibus 48, Cicero writes Qui ingenuis studiis atque artibus delectantur, nonne videmus eos nec valetudinis nec rei familiaris habere rationem omniaque perpeti ipsa cognitione et scientia ...
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664 views

How do you parse “futurum est” in Matthew 2:13?

I'm a little confused about a verse in Matthew 2 of the Vulgate Bible. Futurum est enim ut Herodes quærat puerum ad perdendum eum. (Matthew 2:13) Douay-Rheims translates this as, "For it will ...
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3answers
1k views

Is Thomas Hobbes' translation of “nosce te ipsum” as “read thyself” valid?

In the introduction to the original, English version of Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes says: … there is another saying not of late understood, by which they might learn truly to read one another,...
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471 views

Pyramus et Thisbe: did their parents forbid what they could not? Ovid, Metamorphoses IV.61

The Latin Library has the following punctuation for lines 60–62 of book IV of Ovid's Metamorphoses, describing how Pyramus and Thisbe fell in love but were forbidden from marrying by their parents: ...
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715 views

'auferre trucidare rapere falsis nominibus imperium […] appellant': justification for translation

The following quote by Tacitus (extract from Agricola) is very famous, particularly for its catchy second part, but here I'm interested in the first part: auferre trucidare rapere falsis nominibus ...