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Implied pronouns

A few days ago I asked a question concerning a latin phrase I was coming up with for a story. One of the words I used was grammatically incorrect—it's been a few years since high school—so I changed ...
NoviceNovelist's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
223 views

Questions for Regulus

I am recently trying to read Regulus, the Latin version of the Little Prince translated by Augusto Haury, and I met some problems in Chapter 4. It may be somewhat troublesome to make several threads ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
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1 answer
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Quisque ipse sé díligit, quod quisque per sé sibi cárus est

In the 4. sententiae antíquae exercise of the page 86 of Wheelock's Latin steht: Quisque ipse sé díligit, quod quisque per sé sibi cárus est. My attempt to translate to my native Spanish goes Cada ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
78 views

Ipsí nihil per sé sine eó facere potuérunt

In the 2. sententiae antíquae exercise of the page 86 of Wheelock's Latin steht: Ipsí nihil per sé sine eó facere potuérunt. My attempt to translate to my native Spanish goes Ellos mismos no han ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
59 views

Némó fíliam acerbam cónsulis ipsíus diú díligere potuit

In the 8. practice and review exercise of the page 86 of Wheelock's Latin steht: Némó fíliam acerbam cónsulis ipsíus diú díligere potuit My attempt to translate to my native Spanish goes Nadie ha ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
265 views

Hí Cicerónem ipsum sécum iúnxérunt, nam eum semper díléxerant

In the 9. practice and review exercise of the page 86 of Wheelock's Latin steht: Hí Cicerónem ipsum sécum iúnxérunt, nam eum semper díléxerant My attempt to translation is the following: These of ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
12 votes
1 answer
648 views

Translation of “in” as “and”

In one of his letters to Varro, Cicero says: “Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, deerit nihil.” I’ve found this translated as: “If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need” (...
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403 views

How can I properly translate possessive form of nouns?

"Pater Iūliae est Iūlius". Would this be "Julia's father is Julius", or "The father of Julia is Julius"? I feel like it's missing some words to be the latter. Does it ...
evilbeast's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
203 views

Is there a better translation for the family motto "Fama candida rosa dulcior"?

The literal translation of the Ames Family Motto [ link ] "Fama candida rosa dulcior" usually comes out to something like "Fame is sweeter than the white rose", however as a rank ...
ramses0's user avatar
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1 answer
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How would you translate "purposefulness"?

Purposefulness or goal-orientedness. I've seen such translations as "propositum" or "voluntas", but they seem to refer to "purpose", not to the quality of sticking to a ...
Roman Rudenko's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
199 views

Why is "se" used with "secum" in this quote from Livy?

In this quote from Livy (6.8.6): "ita quocumque se intulisset victoriam secum haud dubiam trahebat." "thus, in whatever direction he went, he carried certain victory with him." ...
tony's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
501 views

What conjunctive function does "ruat caelum" have in "Fiat justitia, ruat caelum"?

"Fiat justitia, ruat caelum" is often rendered as "May justice be done though heaven falls/may fall". While I have no problem with the translation of "Fiat justitia", I ...
Moguntius's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
609 views

"Non splendeat toga, ne sordeat quidem"

In Seneca's Epistulae morales ad Lucilium (Letter 5): Non splendeat toga, ne sordeat quidem. What exactly does ne...quidem mean here? It is certainly not "not even? In Leob we read the ...
d_e's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
1k views

"Solvitas perambulum": Is this real Latin?

I've seen the phrase Solvitas perambulum translated in many places as "Solve it while you walk." But I don't understand the grammar, and I find myself doubting that it's really Latin. Here ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
55 views

The Meaning of "Prosta Ac Vince"?

I'm trying to translate into English the three-word motto of a student newspaper from around 1880. That motto is "Prosta Ac Vince." Knowing some Latin, I think the motto means "Step ...
skb8721's user avatar
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1 answer
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Proclus' Elements of Theology - Syntax Question

Proclus, Elements of Theology, proposition 123: ἀλλ᾽ ἀπὸ τῶν ἐξηρτημένων οἷαί πέρ εἰσιν αὐτῶν αἱ ἰδιότητες γνωρίζονται, καὶ τοῦτο ἀναγκαίως. English Translation: Nevertheless from the beings ...
Ali Nikzad's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
62 views

Position of the adjective of a genitive

Given the following sentence: The ways of the high mountains are rough. Is there any reason to prefer "Altorum montium itinera confragosa sunt" over "Montium altorum itinera cofragosa ...
m26a's user avatar
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1 answer
285 views

Does "acceptam" have any inherent special meaning related to sacredness or consecration?

By sacredness or consecration I mean, e.g., the making of someone into a priest. The specific context in which I'm asking this is in connection with a different Question of mine, in Mythology&...
Adinkra's user avatar
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1 answer
316 views

Can "to him(self)" be an implied phrase for dative or ablative case? E.g., Acts 20:1

Consider the Vulgate of Acts 20:1: Postquam autem cessavit tumultus, vocatis Paulus discipulis, et exhortatus eos, valedixit, et profectus est ut iret in Macedoniam. The Douay-Rheims renders this as:...
Josh's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
227 views

Seneca, Ad Lucilium Epistulae Morales - Translation Explanation

Seneca, Ad Lucilium Epistulae Morales, 58.31, on Plato's lifespan: Nam hoc scis, puto, Platoni diligentiae suae beneficio contigisse, quod natali suo decessit et annum unum atque octogensimum ...
Ali Nikzad's user avatar
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15 votes
5 answers
4k views

"Friends, Romans, Countrymen...": A Translation Problem from Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar"

Mark-Antony's speech (Act III, Scene II), from Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar", is well-known; at least, the opening lines are: "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to ...
tony's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
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How to understand the phrase "Διὸς μεγάλου διὰ βουλάς" from Hesiod's Theogony?

πεύθετο γὰρ Γαίης τε καὶ Οὐρανοῦ ἀστερόεντος οὕνεκά οἱ πέπρωτο ἑῷ ὑπὸ παιδὶ δαμῆναι, καὶ κρατερῷ περ ἐόντι, Διὸς μεγάλου διὰ βουλάς --- Theogony 463~465 For he had heard from Earth and starry Sky ...
Eugene's user avatar
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1 answer
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What does ("in" + Accusative) mean in this Quote from Horace's Satire 4 (Persius)?

In this answer a quote from Horace's, "Satire of Persius" (Satires 4, line 47): "...si facis in penem quidquid tibi venit...", was translated by Tyler Durden to: "...and ...
tony's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
242 views

Meaning of 'illesas' in Magna Carta

In the Magna Carta, article 1, it says In primis concessisse Deo et hac presenti carta nostra confirmasse, pro nobis et heredibus nostris in perpetuum quod Anglicana ecclesia libera sit, et habeat ...
LarsH's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
149 views

Translation check: "prō amōre signī"

What would people take "prō amōre signī" to mean in English? Also, is the use of ablative case for "amōre" correct) required following the preposition "prō", and how ...
mangobrain's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
750 views

How do I best say “choose love” in Latin?

I’ve found power in the phrase “choose love” for a while, and feel drawn to write it out in Latin. For me, this phrase is a constant reminder to choose love (and by extension, choose being true to ...
Vanessa's user avatar
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5 votes
0 answers
75 views

Why "absolute" instead of "absolutam"?

There's a famous piece of mathematics by János Bolyai, originally published in Latin, under the title Scientiam Spatii Absolute Veram Exhibens: A Veritate Aut Falsitate Axiomatis XI Euclidei, A Priori ...
Draconis's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
515 views

Unsure why the accusative relative pronoun is used? [Tacitus Annals 2.24]

I hope this is the right place to ask this, and I hope it seems I have done enough research before asking. Basically, I am working my way through translating Tacitus' Annals, and have come across ...
fdvries's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
728 views

"Audi nos" translation problem

Commonly, Audi nos is translated as "hear us". Audi is the imperative form of the verb but nos is ordinarily translated as "we". How does "we" become "us"? Is ...
Michael McConville's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
85 views

Where in ‘quibus vidēmus optābilīs mortēs fuisse’ is the act of choosing expressed?

Towards the end of Cicero’s Tusculan disputations book 1, he says: Ita sunt multī, quibus vidēmus optābilīs mortēs fuisse cum glōriā. Cic. Tusc. 1.116 My translation of this is presently ‘So many ...
Canned Man's user avatar
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9 votes
1 answer
153 views

Nested prepositional phrases

I'm trying to learn me some Latin recently, using Euler's works as my training material, since some of them already have English translations, so I can compare my attempts with theirs, and use them as ...
SasQ's user avatar
  • 193
6 votes
1 answer
187 views

Aristotle Metaphysics - questions on syntax

Metaphysics, 994b7-9: ἅμα δὲ καὶ ἀδύνατον τὸ πρῶτον ἀΐδιον ὂν φθαρῆναι: ἐπεὶ γὰρ οὐκ ἄπειρος ἡ γένεσις ἐπὶ τὸ ἄνω, ἀνάγκη ἐξ οὗ φθαρέντος πρώτου τι ἐγένετο μὴ ἀΐδιον εἶναι. Latin translation: Simul ...
Ali Nikzad's user avatar
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9 votes
2 answers
281 views

Are “magna” and “maxima” incorrectly translated in these examples? (Seneca Epistula I)

I am reading the Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium by Seneca, both in the original Latin and in various translations for comparison/understanding (English, French, Italian, German). For the following ...
polygokko's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
139 views

Position of predicative, genitive and adjective

I had the following sentence to translate: The hostages of the Gauls of good family were for Caesar solid pledges of the fidelity of the chiefs and the nobles. I'll mention here the original ...
m26a's user avatar
  • 307
1 vote
2 answers
7k views

Why is "sic semper erat, et sic semper erit" translated this way?

This is what it always was and will always be Where is the thus meaning in here from the word sic? And the word this is not written. I've always wondered how these translations are made since I tried ...
Johhan Santana's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
583 views

How should "Haec Fracastorius." be translated?

In William Gilbert's De Magnete (1600), while he writes about electricity and the amber effect (the tendency for amber, when rubbed, to attract bits of chaff) he quotes Hieronymous Fracastorius (...
Sam Gallagher's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
166 views

More detailed translation of a passage

In the book «Elementos de Retórica» by the 18th-century Spanish priest and latinist Calixto Hornero, there is the following sentence (link to 1815 edition): Cernere est plurimos, qui sibi parum ...
Marius Vivanconus Speluncus's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
254 views

What was "ultra terminum" translated to from Horace's poem?

The translation on Perseus for this poem by Horace, gives the following for the third verse: namque me silva lupus in Sabina, dum meam canto Lalagen et ultra terminum curis vagor expeditis, fugit ...
Adam's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
583 views

What would "agenda" be in Ancient Greek?

How should agenda be translated into Greek? The first thing that comes to my mind is just taking the future passive participle, neuter plural, of ἄγω (ᾰ̓χθησόμενα); however, there is a slight ...
cyau's user avatar
  • 163
9 votes
1 answer
3k views

Help me understand this Latin "Dad Joke"

The Paideia Institute's In Medias Res magazine recently published a compilation of “Thirteen Dad Jokes from Ancient Rome.” Dad jokes are apparently supposed to be particularly cheesy jokes and puns (...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
131 views

What does "Prout necessitas ferat atque experientia suffragetur" translate to in English?

What would this latin sentence mean : "Prout necessitas ferat atque experientia suffragetur" ? No idea... Note: found in this link
Andrew's user avatar
  • 149
13 votes
6 answers
2k views

How to say "I am falling in love with this language"?

What I currently have for this is probably a literal translation: In amor cum haec lingua cado Thank you 🙏
Johhan Santana's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
3k views

What is the word for knowledge in Greek?

I read that there are two version depending on intrinsic value. So that it is either intellectual knowledge or divine knowledge, knowledge from within. And is there a difference between Ancient Greek ...
ShiaForced's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
428 views

Why is "Onus" in the Dative Case?

North & Hillard Ex. 211: a general addresses his soldiers as an approaching enemy is about to encircle them. The following is to be translated into Latin: "But since the enemy are already ...
tony's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
103 views

"Life decreed better!" in Latin

Sort of, related to my another qestion. I am looking for mo secular (for the lack of a better word) version of a phrase "Di melius!". While I know that deus could be interpreted as "...
Ignoramus Philomathum's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
265 views

Is "Heaven decreed better!" a correct translation for "Di melius!"

The phrase Di melius! comes from Letter 98 of Moral letters to Lucilius, original text can be found here. The translation Heaven decreed better! is by Richard M. Gummere Ph.D. More comprehensive ...
Ignoramus Philomathum's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
167 views

The Role of "quem" in a Translation of Cicero

Cicero "de Oratione" (2.86.351): "iam istuc quantum tibi ego reliquerim, inquit Antonius, erit in tua potestate. Si enim vere agere volueris, omnia tibi relinquo; sin dissimulare, tu ...
tony's user avatar
  • 8,772
10 votes
2 answers
420 views

How should "porta itineri longissima" be interpreted?

According to a comment by @SebastianKoppehel, the interpretation of porta itineri as "the gate to the journey" seems questionable. Wiktionary, for example, has the following translation: ...
Expedito Bipes's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
376 views

'Quod' after 'cum' and before 'si'

Avicenna, Philosophia Prima, Tractatus IX, Capitulum VII, p. 512, line 15-18: Tu autem scis quod, cum intendis in aliquid quod nimis est tibi cordi, si praesentatur tibi aliquid in quo est voluptas ...
Ali Nikzad's user avatar
  • 1,567
3 votes
1 answer
161 views

About the Latin translation of Avicenna

I have a problem in the Latin translation of Avicenna's Metaphysics, that is Liber de philosophia prima sive scientia divina. Tractatus IX, Capitulum VII, p. 510, line 67-70: Huiusmodi autem res ...
Ali Nikzad's user avatar
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