Questions tagged [translation-check]

For getting community feedback on an attempted translation.

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How good is the new version of Google Translate?

Google Translate recently (a few days ago I believe) updated its translation model for Latin and the results seem quite impressive to me. However, I am by no mean fluent in Latin and I would like to ...
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18 votes
7 answers
5k views

What is the best "worst" translation of Latin from Google Translate?

It's well-known on this community that you can't trust any Latin translation from Google Translate. A comment about translating goatherd with Google Translate got me thinking, though. What is the most ...
5 votes
2 answers
1k views

Memento Mori--Revisited

In Q:What does memento mori actually mean? there does not appear to be a natural conclusion. Apposite contributions appeared as comments but were not developed. Perhaps it was believed that the Q. had ...
tony's user avatar
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4 votes
4 answers
2k views

Dative of Reference

North & Hillard Ex. 204; Q1: the following is to be translated into Latin: "If he had not mocked me, I should perhaps have forgiven him." (Impossible conditions: past tense: pluperfect subjunctive ...
tony's user avatar
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11 votes
2 answers
2k views

Joke variant of US motto

As a joke, I'm imagining someone being confused about the US motto, and thinking it was "e unum pluribus", which hypothetically might mean "out of the one, many" or similar. But I bet that isn't ...
Loren Rosen's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
3k views

Does this Latin make sense?

I want to use a motto "always seize the future" as a company slogan. Does "capere semper in posterum" make sense? I got it from Google Translate and based on Spanish-English translations from that ...
Wayneio's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
103 views

Estne hoc translatio correcta?

my name is Diego and this is my very first post. I am a big fan of Avicii. I am also a beginner in Latin and was wondering if anyone could help me out checking the translation I've put together of a ...
Diego Ojeda's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
393 views

In regards to "Est" and "Errare humanum est"

I am new to Latin and very rough because I am teaching it to myself after so many years. I was working on a sentence that I thought was simple enough but became confused. The translation of "...
LatinNewbie's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
145 views

Advice From History

The rise of right-wing (fascist) parties, in too many parts of Europe, is as concerning as it is disturbing. Totalitarianism, with its seductive promise of simplistic solutions, always seems to have ...
tony's user avatar
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18 votes
3 answers
17k views

How does "It's totally fucked" translate to Latin?

The closest I can manage (uneducated) is "Prorsus Futui Est," but I suspect that's somewhat (if not completely) wrong.
Michael Davidson's user avatar
15 votes
1 answer
1k views

Translating "I too can write in Latin"

I want to translate this short sentence to Latin: I too can write in Latin. I mean that there are also others who know Latin, not that I can write in other languages or that I can speak Latin. ...
Craig Harkins's user avatar
15 votes
4 answers
1k views

Is the Phrase "Sola Dea Fatum Novit" Proper Latin?

I have seen this sentence translated as both "Only the Goddess knows fate" and "Only the Goddess knows their fate". That aside, I remember someone telling me that this was not correct Latin, and it ...
Meta's user avatar
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14 votes
1 answer
416 views

Translating "Nocte volat caelī mediō"

Line 184 of Vergil's Aeneid, Book IV, begins as follows: Nocte volat caelī mediō Would this be translated as "She of the sky flies in the middle of the night", or "At night she flies in the middle ...
Sapphira's user avatar
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13 votes
6 answers
738 views

"Mind the gap!"

I am currently in London, and the Underground has been kind enough to repeat this warning numerous times: Please mind the gap between the train and the platform! Having heard the same phrase over ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
12 votes
1 answer
395 views

Understanding the grammar: «illis Evangelii nuntiandi praebens mandatum»

The following is the Latin text from the Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC), Prologue, Chapter 1, Section 2: 2 Ut haec vocatio in toto resonaret orbe, Christus Apostolos misit, quos elegerat, ...
Der Übermensch's user avatar
12 votes
3 answers
12k views

How do you translate "Don't Fear the Reaper" into Latin?

In T. Pratchett's Discworld series, Death's motto is "Non Timetis Messor", meant to be a translation of "Don't Fear the Reaper". But in other books he uses "Timetere", and I am unsure of which would ...
Whitehot's user avatar
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11 votes
3 answers
1k views

Translate "I listened to... and all I got was this t-shirt" into Latin

I have a musical project I've been working on called Instruments of Ruin (it's instrumental, so the name is a play on that). I want to make shirts for it that have the phrase, "I listened to ...
Adam's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
2k views

Translation of "since 1950" (for example)

I'm in the midst of designing a graphic for my parents' 50th anniversary celebration, and for obscure reasons I want to include the proper Latin equivalent of "since 1967", in the same way that a ...
Mike's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
3k views

Translate "Everything burns" into classical Latin

In a project of mine I have an event which was named "everything burns", or potentially "Everything burned" (I am open to both tenses). What would this be in classical Latin? I tentatively have this ...
Adam's user avatar
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9 votes
1 answer
241 views

Sherlockian Logic

In the crime novels by Sir Arthur Conan-Doyle, central character, detective, Sherlock Holmes described his approach to evidence-analysis as the discarding of the impossible; then, whatever remains, ...
tony's user avatar
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9 votes
4 answers
2k views

How do you say " Coup de grâce " in latin?

After searching for vocabs and etymologies in wiktionary I translated it only myself and I've got " gratiae colaphus " Is it correct? Or should I use "misericordiae" for "...
Vince's user avatar
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9 votes
1 answer
842 views

When do we add -NE when asking a question?

There are some times that you use QUID EST or UBI EST Which I assume are known as a question starting point. But then there are verbs that you add a NE at the end to make the other person know you ...
Johhan Santana's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
628 views

Latin phrase, modelled on "horror vacui", for the fear of "equality"?

A usual latin phrase is horror vacui, which in English can be rendered as fear of emptiness. Question: what do you consider a correct Latin translation of the English fear of equality? The question ...
guest's user avatar
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9 votes
1 answer
405 views

Translation of de Natura Deorum, 53

“Infima est quinque errantium terraeque proxuma stella Veneris, quae Φωσφόρος Graece, Latine dicitur Lucifer, cum antegreditur solem, cum subsequitur autem Hesperos," Source: M. Tullius Cicero, de ...
DukeZhou's user avatar
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9 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is it acceptable/regular to use diacritics (macron) in written texts?

I'm building the brand for a web development company, and I'm using Latin for the name and slogan. However, as I am not familiar with the language, I would like some help clarifying meanings to avoid ...
GregKos's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
3k views

Help translating "It's not a bug, it's a feature!"?

I know no Latin, but playing around with Google Translate I came up with "Non insectum opus est". Insectum seems like a good stand in for a generic bug, but maybe blatta is better (see http:/...
ManicPolymath's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
790 views

Can "sum" and "nemo" work together to create a phrase meaning "I am no one?"

I have been trying to understand the relationship between "sum" and "nemo", to create a phrase meaning something like "I am no one". In all the contexts I personally ...
Lulah's user avatar
  • 171
8 votes
2 answers
1k views

Translate "iconoclast" to classical Latin

I am translating "iconoclast" into classical Latin. It was translated into Ecclesiastical Latin as Iconoclasta, but I would rather translate it from the original Byzantine Greek meaning of image-...
Adam's user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
484 views

Is "ergo" an appropriate word for this context?

I'm translating this sentence into Latin: You said that I could do anything, so I went to the strip club. (It's for a late Valentine's card for my girlfriend.) So far, I have the first and second ...
user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
4k views

How can we distinguish "Si vis pacem, para bellum" translations?

On Wikipedia it is said that Si vis pacem, para bellum means "If you want peace, prepare for war". But I think that It also seems like "If you want peace, prepare war". What makes ...
Nabla's user avatar
  • 365
7 votes
1 answer
643 views

"reges stellae" or "reges astrum" to evoke self-confident "Star Kings"?

I am writing a story about three "space cowboy" types who call themselves "Star Kings." They are full of confidence to the point of arrogance. They also see their adventures as a path to glory and ...
StandardEyre's user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
526 views

What to call a book review?

This earlier question asked about translating a sentence about book reviews. Translating the concept correctly was unimportant, since the question was about syntax and pronouns. In my answer I gave ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
116 views

Unsure of translation into Latin (a letter by Jefferson)

So in writing something in Latin about the state of affairs in the US, I want to quote Thomas Jefferson's 1820 letter to John Holmes in which he says, about the Missouri Compromise (which required ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
184 views

Translating "mankind evolves" and two other two-word phrases

Are you willing to take a look at my efforts at translating 6 words from English to Latin? Here goes: Mankind evolves: Homines evolvant God disappoints: Deus frustrat Reason refutes: Ratio ...
C. Torres-George's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
119 views

Any suggestions for translating a verse from an American Song

I am trying to translate a verse from "Brutal Love" by Green Day. I only have one semester of Latin. I tried to translate it using Wiktionary. English: Old toys This plastic heart Loners and ...
abuchay's user avatar
  • 161
6 votes
1 answer
1k views

What would be the correct translation for "Out of few, many"?

I'm looking for a modification of the famous slogan E pluribus unum which translates to Out of many, one and is the traditional motto of the United States. Instead I want to say Out of few, many. What ...
mcExchange's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
1k views

mihi vs meus. When to use which?

When would be the right time to use either for example filius decorus meus/mihi from what I understand, using mihi with nominative seems to mean the same as using meus?
Johhan Santana's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
385 views

'Volo' in Indirect Speech

I am to translate the following sentence into Latin: The king told Fabricius that he would give him a fourth part of the kingdom. I did it as follows: Rex Fabricium dixit se velle dare quartam ...
Stephen Perencevich's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
128 views

To aid love lost and gained

I am seeking a translation of a Christopher Wren inspired memento mori: If you seek my monument do not look around, (rather) Look you here upon her beautiful face, deep into her eyes. My school ...
jack ellis's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
179 views

Checking translation of "ubi vitam amavisti, illuc reverteris"

I heard once someone say: "where you loved life, there you will return". My attempt to translate that into Latin is ubi vitam amavisti, illuc revertēris Is that correct? Or is there a way to ...
Alfie González's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
608 views

What is "Sidera, quae vocantur errantia" in English?

I was reading the Perseus entry for sidus, which gives this quotation from Cicero: Sidera, quae vocantur errantia The original quote has sidera in ablative rather than nominative. I'm looking to ...
Adam's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
254 views

Is "Heaven decreed better!" a correct translation for "Di melius!"

The phrase Di melius! comes from Letter 98 of Moral letters to Lucilius, original text can be found here. The translation Heaven decreed better! is by Richard M. Gummere Ph.D. More comprehensive ...
Ignoramus Philomathum's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
141 views

Translation verification

I’m wondering whether my translation is correct. I wrote: tempus fugit; sed muscae fugiunt etiam. I meant for this to mean: Time flies, but flies fly too. I really don't have any knowledge ...
Alex D's user avatar
  • 185
5 votes
1 answer
337 views

'Aurifer' or 'Auriferus'?

What is the masculine form of "Aurifera" ? I supposed it was "auriferus": Tibicen auriferus is like a goldish beetle. http://www.masscic.org/sightings/cicadas/tibicen-auriferus-in-...
ephesinus's user avatar
  • 535
5 votes
1 answer
1k views

Translation: Out of my death, new life

I took a Latin course a few years ago, and now I'm trying my hand for a friend's tattoo. Is my translation of the title correct? English: Out of my death, new life. Latin attempt: Ex mei mortis ...
Alexander Skage's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
391 views

How to say "My family is growing"

I still haven't studied enough verbs to really be 100% sure. How do I say "My family is growing" in Latin? I have: Familia mea [some form of the verb crescere] est
Johhan Santana's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
571 views

Is "Ut facerem sed retro oblitus" idiomatic for "I was going to, but then I got distracted and forgot"?

I translated "I would have done it, but turned and forgot" via google translate, hoping that phrasing would be end up with a more idiomatic latin phrase. Otherwise, how do I convey the ...
AncientSwordRage's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
191 views

"Escape from New York" movie - title and tagline translation check

I have a "Escape from New York" movie poster over my desk. It reads: 1997.New York City is a walled maximum security prison.Breaking out is impossible.Breaking in is insane. ESCAPE FROM NEW ...
Rodia's user avatar
  • 405
5 votes
1 answer
220 views

Invitation to a thesis defence

I'm preparing invitations to my thesis defence and I thought writing the invitations in Latin (as a joke). However my Latin is very poor. A friend of mine helped me, but I doubt it is very good. ...
Kyle_the_hacker's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
140 views

What are two lines from the Bee-Gee's song, "Don't Forget to Remember Me", in Latin?

The chorus in the Bee-Gees' haunting song, "Don't Forget to Remember Me" (1969), includes: "Don't forget to remember me, And a love that used to be" THE FIRST LINE To translate ...
tony's user avatar
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