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Questions tagged [translation-check]

For getting community feedback on an attempted translation.

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5 votes
1 answer
118 views

Can we use the verb "sum" with the present participle "absens"?

I recall seeing "esse absens" on Google books, but I can't remember who was the writer. Anyway, is this correct in Latin? The verb "absum" already exists, and it means "to be ...
3 votes
1 answer
133 views

Is "Ita an non" a valid, neutral, straightfoward translation of "Yes or no"?

Asking to really, really be sure since I'm planning on getting it tattoed. I just intend that simple sentence in the more correctly latin way possible, but there are many ways to say it and I don't ...
1 vote
0 answers
71 views

How accurate is this song translation Malum Malum (Bad Apple)?

I saw this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgF96RRcrP4 of a Latin cover of "Bad Apple!!" (original lyrics in Japanese but has been translated into many languages) and like the song ...
4 votes
1 answer
81 views

Onwards and Upwards, or maybe Downwards

Ages ago now, Overly Sarcastic Productions released a video on Dante's Inferno, and in it Red said the iconic line "Onwards and upwards, or maybe downwards" in reference to Dante and Virgil'...
3 votes
2 answers
205 views

"hōc enim ūnō modō...scelus" or "hoc enim ūnō modō...scelus" ? (Ritchie's Fabulae faciles, §20)

I read in Ritchie's Fabulae faciles ([Hercules, §20], macrons are mine): Vbi Herculēs fīnem fēcit, Pȳthia prīmō tacēbat; tandem tamen iussit eum ad urbem Tīryntha īre et Eurysthēī rēgis omnia ...
1 vote
2 answers
155 views

Very new learner looking for feed back

I am brand new to the Latin language but have been wanting to start learning for some time. As a first project for myself I’ve attempted to translate my family motto from English to Latin the best I ...
7 votes
3 answers
360 views

To be One's Own Worst Enemy

People who are addicted to things e.g. narcotics, gambling, eating; those who succumb to internet confidence-tricks; others, who cope badly with life and make appalling mistakes are castigated (by ...
5 votes
1 answer
345 views

How would you say "I think our stick insect will die by me giving it to our hamster to eat."? Can you use absolute ablative to mean a cause of death?

My attempt would be: "Ego censeo nostrum phasmidum (insectus qui ut baculum parvum videtur) moriturum esse me danti eum nostro criceto, ut cricetus noster eum voret." But I don't know ...
2 votes
1 answer
79 views

Does “interranima” mean “inner soul”?

I came across this on google translate and I love its sound…I would love to utilize this lovely word if indeed it does mean inner soul!
1 vote
1 answer
94 views

Implied pronouns

A few days ago I asked a question concerning a latin phrase I was coming up with for a story. One of the words I used was grammatically incorrect—it's been a few years since high school—so I changed ...
7 votes
2 answers
5k views

How can we distinguish "Si vis pacem, para bellum" translations?

On Wikipedia it is said that Si vis pacem, para bellum means "If you want peace, prepare for war". But I think that It also seems like "If you want peace, prepare war". What makes ...
4 votes
1 answer
481 views

"Infandum me jubes Regina renovare dolorem" -- Translation

Recently I found this line adapted by Kierkegaard from the Aeneid. In this case "Regina" is a bit of a grim pun as K's fiance (the engagement with whom he had recently broken off) was called ...
8 votes
1 answer
645 views

looking for help with the Latin word for "open"

I am making a shirt for our locksport group and was thinking about incorporating a take on the "Veni,Vidi,Vici" phrase. At locksport competitions it is customary to call out "OPEN" ...
1 vote
1 answer
139 views

Do these Latin phrases make sense?

So I am working on a phrase I want to put on a piece of apparel I am making. The phrase in English has two lines. In English, the lines are as follows: "The Church must always be reformed" ...
2 votes
1 answer
373 views

What case is virtutis in "prope virum summae virtutis sto"?

Consider the sentence, "prope virum summae virtutis sto." What case is virtutis and why? I'm pretty sure that it is genitive due to description, but I'm not sure. In case it helps, I translated it as,...
2 votes
2 answers
114 views

If blood speaks, DNA is its voice

I'm trying to come up with a motto that pays homage to my forensic background. I'm considering sanguis ipso loquitor. Before I carve it into wood, I want to make sure I've not blundered grammatically.
1 vote
0 answers
119 views

Family Motto: Interpreting Translator Results

The following phrase is assumed to be correctly noted from an O.E. church inscription, probably dating to at least the 15th century. Tune Desiuis Esse Noli Gloiare Google and many other online ...
4 votes
1 answer
224 views

Do my Latin phrases make sense?

I'm attempting to create a Latin motto or saying to be used in a short story that I'm writing and want to ensure that it makes grammatical sense. I've attempted to figure this out by myself, but just ...
2 votes
2 answers
361 views

How should this sentence be translated to Latin?

English: My ambition allows me to realise I do not have to sacrifice. Latin: Mea ambitia concedo mea comprehendo non habeo sacrifico. Is this correct?
7 votes
2 answers
426 views

Is "Mei Uxor animusque" a correct translation of "My wife and soul"?

Was looking to do an inscription on a ring for my fiance (engagement ring) Mei Uxor animusque My (plural m) wife (f) and soul(m) The -que implies that these things are close together by making ...
4 votes
1 answer
244 views

Reimagining the logical gates in Latin

Boolean logic has logical gates which have the following truth tables: NON gate: Input Output 0 1 1 0 AND gate: Input A Input B Output 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 NAND gate: Input A Input B ...
-2 votes
4 answers
326 views

If the laws of physics no longer apply in the future, god help you

I am trying to translate the phrase If the laws of physics no longer apply in the future, god help you. I have some problems to decide how to translate no longer to Latin*, in Spanish it would be more ...
0 votes
1 answer
119 views

Quisque ipse sé díligit, quod quisque per sé sibi cárus est

In the 4. sententiae antíquae exercise of the page 86 of Wheelock's Latin steht: Quisque ipse sé díligit, quod quisque per sé sibi cárus est. My attempt to translate to my native Spanish goes Cada ...
0 votes
1 answer
79 views

Ipsí nihil per sé sine eó facere potuérunt

In the 2. sententiae antíquae exercise of the page 86 of Wheelock's Latin steht: Ipsí nihil per sé sine eó facere potuérunt. My attempt to translate to my native Spanish goes Ellos mismos no han ...
2 votes
1 answer
59 views

Némó fíliam acerbam cónsulis ipsíus diú díligere potuit

In the 8. practice and review exercise of the page 86 of Wheelock's Latin steht: Némó fíliam acerbam cónsulis ipsíus diú díligere potuit My attempt to translate to my native Spanish goes Nadie ha ...
3 votes
1 answer
275 views

Hí Cicerónem ipsum sécum iúnxérunt, nam eum semper díléxerant

In the 9. practice and review exercise of the page 86 of Wheelock's Latin steht: Hí Cicerónem ipsum sécum iúnxérunt, nam eum semper díléxerant My attempt to translation is the following: These of ...
7 votes
1 answer
343 views

How to translate "Comfort the afflicted; afflict the comfortable?"

I am trying to translate the saying "Comfort the afflicted; afflict the comfortable" into Latin, but I don't actually know Latin, and I've run into a wall. I think the verbs should be ...
2 votes
1 answer
216 views

Translation Request, English to Latin

How can I translate this sentence to Latin, "Man in the palace! Remember death, live with fear of death. Leave us alone." I translate like that but... I don't know, I guess, I did a mistake. ...
1 vote
1 answer
165 views

"I am on imperial business and may not be interfered with..."

In the TV-series, "I Claudius" (BBC, 1976), episode 6, Drusus (Son of Emperor Tiberius, nicknamed, "Castor") stops a prefect, in the street, who was arresting one of his friends. ...
12 votes
1 answer
738 views

Translation of “in” as “and”

In one of his letters to Varro, Cicero says: “Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, deerit nihil.” I’ve found this translated as: “If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need” (...
0 votes
1 answer
86 views

Attemping to translate the song "Alright"

Given that some look like that don't understand the importance of macros here is some reference by ScorpioMartinus where explains that speaking Latin without their macros is like speaking German ...
-1 votes
1 answer
166 views

Attempt to translate the song "Still Alive"

Important note Given that some looks like that don't understand the importance of macros here is some reference by ScorpioMartinus where explains that speaking Latin without their macros is like ...
4 votes
2 answers
120 views

Is sexágéní horae an appropriate translation of minute/minuto?

My Spanish-English dictionary translates minute/minuto as punctum temporis, which makes sense in some usages of the words, but not makes sense when speaking of the units, thus is sexágéní horae an ...
4 votes
1 answer
2k views

Arx celebris fontibus

I bought yesterday a bottled mineral water, of the Harrogate brand, which label states: Harrogate's motto 'Arx celebris fontibus' translates as 'a citadel famous for its springs'. (this is the ...
3 votes
1 answer
149 views

A translation for "A part for understanding the whole" - "ad res" or "ad rem"?

When translating "A part for understanding / to understand the whole," can I use a construction with "ad res" / "ad rem", e.g., "pars ad res tota intelligendas"?...
5 votes
1 answer
231 views

Is there a better translation for the family motto "Fama candida rosa dulcior"?

The literal translation of the Ames Family Motto [ link ] "Fama candida rosa dulcior" usually comes out to something like "Fame is sweeter than the white rose", however as a rank ...
1 vote
1 answer
99 views

Cafaea pignerā est — the coffee is pledged?

I've tried to write a variation on 'alea iacta est' but for having given someone money on ko-fi, a website that styles their content creator donations as 'giving a coffee', hence the name 'ko-fi'. Is '...
0 votes
0 answers
78 views

Translate "Don't follow in fear, lead with light" into Latin

A late friend of mine came up with the phrase, "Don't follow in fear, lead with light" not long before he passed. I'd like to express this in Latin. He intended the meaning to be all-...
8 votes
2 answers
2k views

Best modern translation for "Emperor"?

The word "Emperor" seems a bit hard to pin down in Latin when looking for a constant expression to use, because of its multiple synonyms that seem to have been employed frequently throughout ...
3 votes
1 answer
234 views

Is this translation correct?

"Hasn't your mother told you she doesn't like your girlfriend? "Materne(nonne mater)non tua tibi dixit illam non amare amicam tuam?" I find this weird because I learned that a double ...
4 votes
2 answers
161 views

Latin translation of "Killing in the name of"

Google translate gives "occidere in nomine", which seems correct to me. For context, it will be used in a tattoo, followed by a symbol. It will go something like: "killing in the name ...
3 votes
1 answer
506 views

Translate "Before the Fire" and "After the Fire" into Classical Latin

I am translating the phrases "Before the Fire" and "After the Fire" into Classical Latin. These are used for dating in a fashion similar to how B.C.E./B.C. and C.E./A.D. are used ...
9 votes
1 answer
961 views

When do we add -NE when asking a question?

There are some times that you use QUID EST or UBI EST Which I assume are known as a question starting point. But then there are verbs that you add a NE at the end to make the other person know you ...
2 votes
0 answers
115 views

Feedback on the translation of an English poem into Latin

While struck by a bout of insomnia the other night, I decided to try my hand at writing a poem in Latin. I am not at all confident in my correct usage of certain vocabulary words, as I had a harder ...
10 votes
1 answer
699 views

Translation of building inscription regarding architect of Alcantara Bridge

The Alcantara Bridge in the Extremadura region of Spain is one of the oldest structures extant whose architect is known by name. It spans the Tagus River near the modern-day border of Spain and ...
3 votes
0 answers
119 views

The obligations of the knight

I was studying the order of knights os St. John and found the 8 obligations or aspirations of a Knight, they are: to live in truth to have faith repent one's sins give proof of humility love justice ...
-1 votes
1 answer
121 views

What is the meaning of "fallar"?

"Sum ut nox Et fallar mox" My conversation partner showed me a poem he's written and I couldn't understand the meaning of the future passive form "fallar". He told me to use the ...
5 votes
1 answer
747 views

"Habemus dicentis"?

The headline on electoral-vote.com this morning is Habemus Dicentis, playing on Habemus Papam ("We have a pope") to announce the selection of Kevin McCarthy as Speaker of the U.S. House of ...
4 votes
1 answer
64 views

Position of the adjective of a genitive

Given the following sentence: The ways of the high mountains are rough. Is there any reason to prefer "Altorum montium itinera confragosa sunt" over "Montium altorum itinera cofragosa ...
4 votes
1 answer
88 views

Help with translating "focused on humans" or "caring about people" from English to Latin?

I'm hoping to riff off of the US Military's "Sempre Fidelis/Sempre Fi", I want to show that we should always focus on/care about humans/people (instead of technology, or shareholders, or ...

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