Questions tagged [translation]

For questions regarding translating, either from or to Latin. N.B. Questions must show some effort!

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3
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2answers
149 views

Not fallen in Latin

Would "Non Lapsus" be a good way of writing "Not Fallen" in Latin? (Lapsus chosen because it refers to the Biblical Fall of Man)
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1answer
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Superlatives In Subordinate Clauses

North & Hillard Ex. 198 begins: "It was already dawning when the general gave the signal, promising a great reward to the first man who climbed the walls." The translation: "iam illucescebat cum ...
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1answer
64 views

Latin expression for “carrying something on one's back”

In Spanish, the word cuesta is nowadays used as slope. Nonetheless, the etymology of the word indicates that it comes fom Latin costa, ae meaning "a side" but also "a rib". In fact, an old meaning for ...
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Second vs. third person in future imperative for a general rule or maxim

I am trying to translate "plan [in order] to achieve" into Latin. Is it more appropriate to use second ("meditator ut consequaris") or third person ("meditator ut consequatur") in future imperative ...
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1answer
58 views

How to translate “A moment in my arms, a lifetime in my heart” for a tattoo?

I’m in need of some help with a translation from English to Latin. I’m in the middle of designing a tattoo and the client wants the sentence ‘A moment in my arms, a lifetime in my heart’ to be ...
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Alternative forms in second-person singular present active subjunctive [duplicate]

I am trying to translate "plan [in order] to achieve" into Latin. From the dictionary it looks like both "meditator ut consequaris" and "meditator ut consequare" are grammatically correct. Are they, ...
2
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1answer
164 views

Are there linguistic arguments for the claim that “Odi et amo” in Catullus (LXXXV) cannot be translated as 'I hate and I love'?

On the basis of literary arguments, Arkins (2011) THE MEANING OF ‘ODI ET AMO’ IN CATULLUS 85 came to the interesting conclusion that Odi et amo in the following famous poem by Catullus (LXXXV) cannot ...
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2answers
93 views

A Convenient Co-operation

Continuing with Q: "We Triumph While Our Enemy Sleeps"; SELDOM SCENE (5/7/2019): was astonished that soldiers would enjoy the luxury of sleep while an enemy army approaches; effectively, co-operating ...
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61 views

“Laughing our heads off” in Latin

As a follow-up of an interesting question on a typological classification of Latin (Are Latin verbs of motion satellite-framed or verb-framed? ), I was wondering if Latin has (semi)idiomatic ...
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How would you translate γέγονεν in John 1:15?

I'm translating the 15th verse of John 1, and I'm curious to know the nuances of translating the phrase ὁ ὀπίσω μου ἐρχόμενος ἔμπροσθέν μου γέγονεν, and especially the word γέγονεν. Below is the NA28 ...
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1answer
58 views

What is the correct translation for “The story is not over”?

What is the correct translation for "The story is not over"? "Story" here refers to the metaphorical story of our lives (so rather fabula than historia). "Not over" means that's not completed and that ...
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1answer
46 views

Would You Have a Great Empire--Revisited?

Re: Q asked by colleague, Clark (6/5/2019). So "imperium habere vis magnum?" given as "Would you have a great Empire?". If this is indirect speech, then He (Publilius Syrus) said that the empire (...
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1answer
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A Quas/ Quarum Conflict

In North & Hillard Ex. 200; the following is to be translated into Latin: "He forgot all the wrongs which he had suffered, and by his arrival brought safety to the state which had treated him so ...
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6answers
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How to say 'striped' in Latin

I'm looking for a way to describe striped cloth — that is, with regular stripes all over, or like the stripes on the flag of the USA. I'm well aware of the stripe on a toga, angusticlavus, etc. But ...
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1answer
319 views

Translation of Scottish 16th century church stained glass

This piece of stained glass (about 500mm x 400mm) is in our house but came from our adjoining castle. I think it came from a since ruined church on the same site. Anyone know what it means?
6
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1answer
94 views

“The ignorance and the hubris (arrogance) of our adversaries is our biggest asset.”

I would like to translate the sentence The ignorance and the hubris (arrogance) of our adversaries is our biggest asset. into Latin. Google translations do not seem to be entirely correct and I ...
3
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1answer
36 views

How to translate without verb form?

I am hoping to translate the following from English to Latin: "From Your Grace, I shall know no fear." Latin structure however doesn't use 'shall' apparently. What would the most accurate ...
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3answers
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Did Google Translate give me a literary grade translation of “to the end of the chapter.”

I'm typesetting a book wherein the author regularly references his other works, inviting the reader to study from one particular sub-section until or through the end of the chapter. Unfortunately, ...
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2answers
96 views

Translation for “Made by” or typical Latin equivalent

I’m looking for the correct way to say “made by” or “created by” for a custom garment tag. I have heard of "fecit" coming after a name but I’m thinking about bookplates and the “ex Libris” header as ...
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1answer
108 views

How to translate “Carpe That Diem” properly into Latin?

I was in a store today when I came across a notebook that said "Carpe That Diem" on the cover. How would one translate this phrase into Latin properly? At first I thought to simply translate "that" ...
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1answer
55 views

How do I translate “On the Nature of Renewal” into Latin?

I'm trying to create a title in latin: On the Nature of Renewal where Renewal could be exchanged with Rebirth or Regeneration, and Nature is maybe better as Subject. With this structure, I figured ...
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1answer
136 views

<quality> even for being a <noun>

Salvēte omnēs, hocc erit mihi prīmum rogātum hāc in sēde. Haud dūdum vīdī quendam hominem scīscitārī, quōmodo posset Latīnē dīcī "he has a long tail, even for a cat". Ad quod rogātum cum respondēre ...
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1answer
63 views

Expect the Unexpected

In North & Hillard Ex. 194, a passage is to be translated into Latin: it begins: "Both Demosthenes and the common soldiers were greatly disheartened at this defeat, though Nicias seemed almost to ...
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1answer
90 views

(Greek) what's a “γε causal”?

I read in the very beginning of Platon's Laches (perseus edition): τεθέασθε μὲν τὸν ἄνδρα μαχόμενον ἐν ὅπλοις, ὦ Νικία τε καὶ Λάχης: οὗ δ᾽ ἕνεκα ὑμᾶς ἐκελεύσαμεν συνθεάσασθαι ἐγώ τε καὶ Μελησίας ...
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Names of main Tintin characters in latin?

The website Tintinologist.org gives the following suggestions but it is not complete for the latin language. What would be some good latin names for the various Tintin characters ? Other characters ...
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1answer
161 views

How complex a motion event can be in Classical Latin

How natural would you judge the translation of the following English sentence into Latin? He still wandered on, out of the little high valley, over its edge, and down the slopes beyond. '...
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3answers
175 views

Translating 'creative by nature' / 'naturally creative' into latin

I would like to know the meaning of 'creative by nature' or 'naturally creative' in latin. According to google translater it is 'natura partum', but when translated back into english it means ...
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2answers
136 views

Present Subjunctive Passive

North & Hillard Ex. 213; Q5: the following is to be translated into Latin: "I am willing to send anyone at all to find out what is going on." The answer: "volo quemvis (quemlibet) mittere ...
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1answer
810 views

Why was ante tribus translated as “fifteen years ago”?

In an answer I posted here, I provided someone else's translation which translated ante tribus as "fifteen years ago". The translation provided in the question also translated tribus the same way: ...
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1answer
129 views

“Ite, missa est.” Direct meaning of “Missa est” [duplicate]

In the Catholic liturgy at the dismissal, the Latin phrase used is "Ite, missa est." The usual translation for this is "Go, it is the dismissal." My question is, what is the meaning of "Missa est" ...
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1answer
90 views

Can you please fix the mistakes in translating these prayers from Koine Greek to English (Part 2 of 2)?

This is a continuation from this question I do not know nearly enough Koine Greek to point out what I am specifically unsure about. That said, I do know enough to see that the Greek and English texts ...
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1answer
81 views

Can you please fix the mistakes in translating these prayers from Koine Greek to English (Part 1 of 2)?

This question is continued here I do not know nearly enough Koine Greek to point out what I am specifically unsure about. That said, I do know enough to see that the Greek and English texts do not ...
2
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1answer
54 views

How to say “of the” as in “Church of The Blessed Virgin” with the sense of “belonging to” or “patronage”?

I would be glad if anyone could help me how to translate the name "Church of the Virgin Mary" or at least how to place "of the" in the sense of "belonging in patronage" in such contexts? Other ...
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2answers
93 views

How to say “the word as a weapon”?

As the titles implies, I wish to know how "The word as a weapon" translates into Latin. I think it would be a cool name for a debate club that I'm setting up.
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1answer
64 views

Ancient greek translation exercise - narration, meaning of singular *οὔτε*

In First Greek Book by John Williams White following passage is given for reader to translate: Τισσαφέρνες δέ, ὀ τῆς Καρίας σατράπης, τῷ Κύρῳ πολέμιος ἦν, τότε δὲ οὔτε ἐστράτευεν ἐπ' αὔτε διήρπαζε ...
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1answer
484 views

Translating “day one” into Latin

What would be the ideal translation of ‘one day’ and ‘day one’? I.e. you can choose to do something ‘one day’, or today could be ‘day one’ if you get started now.
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1answer
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Parsing Priapea 31

Intermediate here. I am having a hard time parsing this poem (Carmina Priapea 31). Apologies for the tawdry material, by the way :) Donec proterva nil mei manu carpes, licebit ipsa sis pudicior ...
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1answer
461 views

Fortune Favors the Bold

I have seen quite a few translations such as, Audentes Fortuna Juvas Audentis Fortuna Iuvat Audecis Fortuna Juvat But, what is the correct translation? I am looking for the one which matches ...
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2answers
86 views

What is 'leading the way day and night' in Latin?

This is the motto for my Dad's SWAT team. They wanted to have a Latin translation and which could be put on a shirt, and possibly their new badge.
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1answer
47 views

How to translate “The stolen letter of Arithmetic”

I would like to give a memorable title to a short text that I am writing and I thought of the above one in reference to the short novel by E. A. Poe, The Purloined Letter. A few attempts with ...
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1answer
47 views

How do you say 'tidy up'?

How could the verb phrase 'tidy up' be put in Latin please?
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1answer
80 views

How to get “almost everything” from “vix non quaedam” in this translation of a sentence from J.J. Fux?

I'm trying to understand an English translation of a Latin sentence from J.J. Fux's Gradus ad Parnasum (written in Latin in 1725). Here is the sentence: Tuâ aviditate, quam tamen laudo, fit, ut ...
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2answers
261 views

“Blood for the Blood God” vs “Gloria In Excelsis Deo”

I play a scifi game where you build your own pieces and the language in the game is a derivative of Latin. I want to write a couple battle cries/prayers on the sides of one of my game pieces. The ...
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1answer
78 views

Parsing Priapea IV

I'm kind of 'intermediate' Latin, and I can't find a completely satisfactory way to parse this poem (Priapea IV, Bucheler Ed. via latinlibrary): Obscaenas rigido deo tabellas dicans ex ...
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0answers
125 views

Seeking simple Latin translation for motto “fire, flow, transcendence”

I am in a community of flow artists and fire performers. I'm putting together a "coat of arms" of sorts for this community, and would like to include a motto in Latin. The motto in English would be ...
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1answer
75 views

Translating “Blood isn't always thicker than water.”

My step grandpa passed, and I want a tattoo in latin that says, "Blood isn't always thicker than water." I would greatly appreciate it if someone translates this.
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1answer
59 views

How might I write a latin phrase for swapping bodies?

Putting together a small literary piece where an item is inscribed with a Latin phrase that hints that it can be used to swap bodies (or minds, depending, I suppose, on your perspective) with another ...
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4answers
2k views

What is the best way to translate 'remember' into Latin?

Id like to get a tattoo saying 'remember' but translated in Latin. I have learned that the translation depends on what message it would like to convoy with 'remember'. The message id like to convey ...
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3answers
760 views

Latin for clockwise/anticlockwise?

I'm trying to express 'clockwise' and 'anti-clockwise' in Latin, for which there are not likely to be classical precedents. Other languages generally seem to lack such brief and simple expressions : ...
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1answer
56 views

How would I write “Hermit Farm” in Latin

My wife and I have built a forever home on 25 acres just outside a small country town (population approximately 8000) in Australia. We have joked over the years that we are doing this because we are ...