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Questions tagged [time]

The tag has no usage guidance.

8
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2answers
2k views

Are the names of these months realistic?

I'm working on a calendar. To choose the name of the months I focused on Latin and in particular on a systematisation of the names finishing with 'ber'. I was wondering if my choices were correct and ...
3
votes
1answer
201 views

Telling Time in Latin

How do you tell time in Latin? For instance, how do you translate "it is 10 o'Clock" or how would you translate "it is 10:30"? I am just curious and would appreciate a general response or a specific ...
8
votes
2answers
214 views

Is 'datus' used for a date in Latin?

In many languages the word for date (a specific day, such as January 2, 2019) seems to come from the Latin participle datus: we have the English "date", the Italian "data", the Swedish "datum", and ...
8
votes
1answer
801 views

Why was ante tribus translated as “fifteen years ago”?

In an answer I posted here, I provided someone else's translation which translated ante tribus as "fifteen years ago". The translation provided in the question also translated tribus the same way: ...
5
votes
1answer
81 views

How to phrase “it took two hours”?

In English or Finnish I can express the time it took to complete something in two ways, but in Latin only one: E: "I did it in two hours." F: "Tein sen kahdessa tunnissa." L: Duabus horis id perfeci. ...
3
votes
1answer
54 views

How is time period expressed in Latin?

How is time period expressed in Latin, e.g. "from Jan 1 to Mar 31"? I notice there are two prepositions meaning "from", "ab" and "ex". What's their difference? Which should I use for time period?
4
votes
1answer
67 views

Spatial equivalent to extemporalis/intempestivus?

The term extemporalis refers unusual events in time, such as an exceptional snowstorm in spring time. I was wondering if there is an equivalent term which refers, not to a temporal aspect of an ...
7
votes
2answers
85 views

How to distinguish Julian and Gregorian calendars in Latin?

In some contexts it is important to express whether a given date (for example October 25 and November 7 in 1917) is according to the Julian or the Gregorian calendar. Are there established Latin ...
5
votes
1answer
196 views

How would this date be translated into Latin?

I want to engrave my ring with my wedding date in Latin. The date is June 8th, 2010. Can you translate this for me?
7
votes
1answer
71 views

Expressing a number of years with a single word

An answer to an earlier question about age of wine introduced me to adjectives for specific ages in years. Similarly, there are nouns for periods of time in years. For example: bimus & biennium ...
7
votes
3answers
188 views

What is “old” in the age of a wine?

If I were to say "this man is 40 years old" in Latin, I would say hic vir 40 annos natus est. That is, I would use the participle natus instead of any adjective meaning "old", and it is my impression ...
10
votes
1answer
165 views

Translation of “since 1950” (for example)

I'm in the midst of designing a graphic for my parents' 50th anniversary celebration, and for obscure reasons I want to include the proper Latin equivalent of "since 1967", in the same way that a ...
6
votes
1answer
63 views

Which case to use with posthinc?

L&S mentions that abhinc can be used with either accusative or ablative. But no use guidance is given for posthinc. Can I use both accusative and ablative to express the length of time, or only ...
6
votes
1answer
73 views

Times at the end of daylight saving

I had to wake up before 3 am this morning (on a Sunday!), and I had to worry about the start of daylight saving time. (It always starts on the last Sunday of March in Europe. Other areas have other ...
5
votes
2answers
404 views

How would you say, “How long have you been a X?”

I want to say in Latin, "How long have you been a dog? I have been a dog four or five years now." But how do I form the interrogative phrase, "How long?" My first inclination was to use the phrase "...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

What did the Romans call the New Year?

What word was used in the ancient Rome to describe the time — and festivities if any — when one year ends and another begins? The literal translation of "new year", annus novus, can be ...
10
votes
2answers
742 views

How do we know that Kalendae is the first day of a month?

I have been told that Kalendae is the first day of a month. However, the Latin dates — which was discussed in this other question — alone do not make this obvious. Dates are expressed by ...
7
votes
1answer
74 views

Year in dates near the end of a year

Using the traditional dates of the Roman calendar, December 31 and December 30 would be pridie Kalendas Ianuarias and ante diem tertium Kalendas Ianuarias. The day is expressed in relation to the ...
17
votes
2answers
6k views

How do you write dates in Latin?

I have read a little about the history of the Julian and Gregorian calendars. Julius Caesar introduced the twelve-month Julian calendar in 46 BC, and Pope Gregory XIII introduced the Gregorian ...
2
votes
1answer
107 views

How to make a Roman sundial and tell the time in Latin

I can't seem to find anywhere how to make a Roman sundial so I'm wondering if anyone can tell me how or where I can find how to make a Roman sundial? I'm also wondering how Roman time works and how ...
7
votes
1answer
178 views

Are nocte and noctu interchangeable?

The regular ablative of nox is nocte. At least in the temporal sense noctu is a synonym of nocte. Are nocte and noctu fully interchangeable as temporal expressions? In particular, can I attach ...
12
votes
2answers
691 views

Ante urbem conditam

The phrase ab urbe condita is used to express time in years after founding Rome. This can be found in ancient texts. It seems that the natural counterpart would be ante urbem conditam when one wants ...
9
votes
2answers
716 views

How to express a time exactly on the hour?

I would like to express the following times in Latin: "at four o'clock sharp" "every hour, on the hour" I want to emphasize that the event takes place exactly on the hour. My dictionaries do not ...
26
votes
2answers
375 views

How to say “every fourth year” in Latin?

My intuition says that "every fourth year" would translate to Latin as "quarto quoque anno". I read the comic Asterix Olympius in Latin, and on page 11 the druid describes the Olympic games like this: ...