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Questions tagged [synonyms]

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Is there a difference between the -im and -o adverbs?

Some adverbs end in -im and others in -o. For example, there is the adverb furtim and then the (same?) adverb furto, which both apparently mean secretely or stealthily. Is there any difference between ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
67 views

Are monos and eis synonyms?

In Attic Greek, monos means only, alone, and eis means one. Are they synonyms? Can monos also mean one?
Tim's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
269 views

What's difference between a "stagnum" and "lacuna"?

I'm trying to give title to a earth (no pluvial) water "puddle" of photo
ephesinus's user avatar
  • 565
8 votes
0 answers
228 views

Quidquid vs quæcumque

Both quidquid and quæcumque are ways of translating English whatever or all things that [sth.], but is there any difference in meaning in that specific context? I have a vague notion, not based in ...
Rafael's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
191 views

Differences between natio, populus, vulgus, cultus, and societas?

Is there a distinct differentiation between the words natio, populus, vulgus, cultus, and societas in classical Latin? I'm encountering conflicting definitions in various dictionaries.
user avatar
-3 votes
1 answer
219 views

What is the Latin word for the English word "mean"?

In the English language, we might write the following question: "what does the word dog mean"? What is the Latin word for "meaning"? By "meaning" I mean the "...
Samuel Muldoon's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
139 views

can "postquam" and "cum" have the same meaning?

For example: "Postquam Graeciam veni philosophiam didici." = "After I came to Greece I learned philosophy." And, "Cum graeciam venissem, pgilosophiam didici." = "...
Vincentius's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
156 views

What is the difference in meaning between postposition "causa" and preposition "propter"?

What is the difference in meaning between the postposition "causa" and the preposition "propter"? Both mean "because", right?
FlatAssembler's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
73 views

What are some loanwords in Latin where there is no native synonym?

My question about a Latin word for "tattoo" prompted some surprise in me that the Romans didn't borrow a word for tattoo. One would think that some group of people they interacted with who ...
Adam's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
217 views

Difference between Postremo and Postea?

Is there a difference between postremo and postea which both seem to mean afterwards? I did look in Doderlein's Handbook and he doesn't cover these two words.
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
34 views

Difference between cano and canto? [duplicate]

Latin has some pairs of verbs that are both spelled in a similar way and mean similar things. One example of this is cano and canto. Are these words just synonyms or do they have a different meaning ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
95 views

How to distinguish anthropology from human knowledge in Latin?

"scientia hominum" could mean both anthropology (the study of human beings) and "human knowledge" (the corpus of all knowledge acquired by human kind). How do you distinguish ...
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5 votes
1 answer
316 views

Difference between μένω and μίμνω?

Homer uses both μένω and μίμνω, the latter of which looks to me like a reduplicated form. Wiktionary gives definitions that seem almost identical, and says that μένω supplies all of the tenses of ...
user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
252 views

What is the difference between cunctus and totus?

What is the difference between cunctus and totus? Dictionaries give the same meaning for both (all, whole, entirety), but in usage I see certain tendencies. For example, in ecclesiastical Latin, when ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 7,001
7 votes
1 answer
814 views

Can we finally know the difference between these words?

There seem to be four different Latin words, all of which are common, and all of which seem to mean exactly the same thing, "finally": tandem denique demum postremo Is there any difference ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 7,001
2 votes
1 answer
404 views

What was the standard ancient term for a thermopolium?

This page on thermopolia reports a quotation from Mary Beard, classics professor at Cambridge University: “The best way to escape a diet of bread, cheese and fruit, eaten in small lodginggs over a ...
Vincenzo Oliva's user avatar
11 votes
2 answers
820 views

What is "parecbolae"?

Researching an answer for this question, I found a book of regulations of the University of Oxford, dating from the early 19th century. The title is: I cannot find the meaning of Parecbolae anywhere. ...
luchonacho's user avatar
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11 votes
2 answers
964 views

Difference between filiī and liberī

I was reading Orberg's Lingua Latina per se Illustrata and I found the following sentences: Marcus et Quīntus sunt dūo filiī. [...] In familia Rõmāna tres līberī sunt. Now I deduce both words ...
Pablo Ivan's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
5k views

The word *quick* in Latin

There are many words, which are translated as quick. My initial search showed celer: swift , quick, rapid; in a bad sense, hasty, rash celox: swift , quick; f. as subst. a swift vessel, yacht citus: ...
marmistrz's user avatar
  • 633
7 votes
1 answer
259 views

What is the difference between cēvēre and crīsāre?

According to Wikipedia, cēvēre loosely means the actions of a female during intercourse, whereas crīsāre is the same but with anal sex. It later states however that cēvēre refers only to the actions ...
tox123's user avatar
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