Questions tagged [supinum]

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How to say "no one is worth to be believed (to) easily" with dignus+ supine?

The u-supine can connect with dignus like: Nihil dignum dictu actum his consulibus (Livy; nothing worth saying/of mentioning was done ..) But when I tried to use this pattern to say: "No one is ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Verb + dative/ablative-supine

According to A&G, the ablative supine with verbs is "extremely rare" and even the example given: pudet dictu is somewhat not regular since pudet is impersonal (as if it is almost an ...
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10 votes
1 answer
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Why is the supine called "supine"?

I think I understand most Latin grammatical terms in relation to what seems to be their etymology in Latin: cases from nominare, accusare, genus, dare, auferre; tempora from praesens, perfectum; ...
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11 votes
2 answers
605 views

How is the supine related to the derived fourth declension noun?

I asked yesterday about the word venatu. There was a good answer and good comments, but I want to ask a broader related question more specifically — especially due to TKR's comment. I want to know how ...
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8 votes
2 answers
361 views

Can the supine ablative be used for motion?

I came across an Asterix translated into Latin. In the first story page the village chief notices that Asterix and Obelix return from a hunt and says: Asterix atque Obelix venatu redeunt! My question ...
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8 votes
2 answers
274 views

Is there a difference between the future participle and the supine accusative?

The purpose of motion can be expressed in several ways. For example, I would consider the following essentially equivalent (did I forget something?): Ille me salutatum Romam venit. Ille me ...
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5 votes
0 answers
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Can I use an instrument with the supine ablative of respect?

If a book is easy to write, I might say liber facilis est scriptu. Here the supine ablative scriptu is an ablative of respect (ablativus respectus). If I want to be more specific about my writing, I ...
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11 votes
2 answers
368 views

Can a supine verb have arguments?

Consider the following line from the Aeneid, Book VI: nec credere quivi hunc tantum tibi me discessu ferre dolorem. Context: Aeneas has traveled into the underworld, and bumps into Dido, who he ...
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