Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [suffixes]

The tag has no usage guidance.

4
votes
0answers
49 views

What is the etymology of the suffix -aster, -astri?

It's been a bit difficult for me to find good information about the etymology of the derivational suffix -aster. De Vaan doesn't seem to talk about it. A number of sources indicate that it is from ...
5
votes
1answer
54 views

When were different agent noun endings used in Ancient Greek?

In Ancient Greek, it seems that there were various endings for agent nouns. Thomas Dwight Goodell's School Grammar of Attic Greek (1902) mentions -τηρ, -τωρ, -της, -εύς, -τειρα, -τρια, -τρις (-τριδ-), ...
5
votes
1answer
127 views

What augmentative options are there in Latin?

Augmentative, the opposite of diminutive, is a derived word that means greater size or extent. Diminutives are common and productive in Latin, but how about the opposite? Some Romance languages have ...
7
votes
1answer
74 views

Did the “-ālis” and “-āris” suffixes have the same meaning in Latin?

In Spanish we have two suffixes -al and -ar with the same meaning: "after a noun it indicates an abundance of the original word". So from naranjo ('orange tree') we have naranjal ('a group of orange ...
5
votes
1answer
81 views

Has “tribalis” ever been used in Latin?

I was recently looking up the etymologies of some obscure words related to the English word tribe (like the adjective tribual), and I came across a Wiktionary page that asserts that there is or was a ...
5
votes
1answer
59 views

Where does -na come from?

In this answer, fdb suggested that Greek selēnē < selannā < *selas-nā and Latin lūna < losnā < *lowks-nā share a suffix. What is this noun-forming -nā, and is it the same one that's seen ...
5
votes
2answers
69 views

What is the diminutive of κῆτος?

A classic diminutive suffix in Ancient Greek is -ίδιον, which forms a neuter second noun. But what happens when this is applied to a noun with a vowel in the stem? For a concrete example, if I wanted ...
6
votes
0answers
173 views

How did “glutaeus/gluteus” come from Greek “gloutos”? Would “glutiaeus” be more correct?

In anatomy, the muscles of the buttocks are referred to collectively as the "glut(a)eal muscles" in English, and are individually given the following Latin names: glut(a)eus maximus, glut(a)eus medius ...
4
votes
2answers
203 views

Is visne > vin unique?

There is a contraction from the regular visne to vin. Is the same contraction with -ne attested with other verbs in classical Latin? I don't recall seeing questions like loquerin Latine or haben equum ...
16
votes
1answer
238 views

What is the origin of the -a in words like “collega, advena”?

There are a couple of masculine (or common) nouns of the first declension. Some are from masculine Greek -ês, like poeta, nauta. But others, like collega, advena, parricida, scriba, incola, agricola, ...
4
votes
1answer
92 views

Feminine form of -ίδης

The Ancient Greek suffix -ίδης was used to form masculine patronymics - that is to say, one combines it with X to create a name meaning "Son of X". Examples: Ἀλκείδης ("son of Alkaios"), Ἡρακλεῖδαι ("...
2
votes
1answer
112 views

is there “i” suffix that makes verb from noun? etymology of tio(n) suffix

Wiktionary says on PIE -h₃onh₂-: Descendants Italic: ... Latin: -iō (from *-i-h₃onh₂-) (e.g. legiō (“group of selected people”)) Latin: -ō (e.g. Nāsō (“having a conspicuous nose”), poss. ...
3
votes
0answers
69 views

Is the suffix -izo, -izare, -izavi, -izatum formal?

The suffix -ize (or similar) are used to form verbs from nouns and adjectives in several Romance languages. Wiktionary suggests that this stems from the vulgar latin -izo, -izare, -izavi, -izatum, ...
6
votes
2answers
225 views

Where does the suffix “-etum” come from?

I noticed recently that most (but not all) Latin words ending in -etum have something to do with a cluster of vegetation. An obvious example derived into English is an "arboretum." Where does "-etum" ...
6
votes
2answers
217 views

How can the use of “-aeus” as an adjective suffix in “Herculaeus” be explained?

Apparently, the English word "Herculean" has an old spelling variant "Herculæan". This seems to correspond to a Latin variant of the adjective "herculeus/Hercŭlĕus" spelled "Herculæus" (example: "...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Suffix counterpart of klepto-?

I'm trying to come up with a suffix counterpart to the prefix klepto- (basically meaning "related to theft"), seeing that no such thing exists (and thus what I'm doing is technically neologism). For ...
9
votes
0answers
177 views

Etymology and pronunciation of words ending in “-iasis”

Unfortunately, I don’t own any Latin or Greek dictionaries or etymological texts, but I tried to research this topic on the internet. Here is what I found: Perseus: words ending in “iasis” in L&S ...
9
votes
1answer
104 views

How did the Latin past participle suffix -atus develop into modern French -é?

How did the Latin past participle suffix -atus develop into modern French -é? Considering the two following examples: modern French état ("state; status") and été ("been"). Both derives ultimately ...
6
votes
1answer
214 views

What does the -met ending mean in “vosmet” or “temet”

I don't understand where vosmet and temet came from. I know vos and te as pronouns, but what is the -met ending? Is that from some other language? Is it used anywhere else? It seems irregular. Why ...
4
votes
3answers
147 views

Is there a prefix, suffix or adjective to indicate that something is the most numerous?

Is there any way (prefix, suffix, or adjective) to indicate that a noun is the most numerous in some aspect? For instance, if I want to tell everybody that my horse carries the largest number of ...
7
votes
1answer
67 views

What would the correct translation of “anonymity” be in Latin?

I know that the translation of "anonymous" is anōnymus. However, it's a bit unclear which suffix to augment this with. I'm trying to determine the phrase "Privacy in anonymity" in Latin.
14
votes
1answer
536 views

What does the suffix -mentum add to a word's meaning?

Lewis and Short lists 275 words ending in -mentum, many of which have come into English: argumentum augmentum documentum fragmentum pigmentum segmentum etc. Wiktionary (cited as an example, not as ...
13
votes
2answers
691 views

Constructing Latin diminutives

In the course of trying to construct an accurate diminutive form of the word abdomen - which for the record is Latin in origin (in the form abdōmen), having been borrowed by English via Middle French -...
7
votes
1answer
116 views

Is there a difference between -vis and -libet?

The pronouns quivis and quilibet both mean "anyone", and utervis and uterlibet both mean "either one". The suffixes -vis and -libet seem to have a pretty similar effect. (I am not sure if there are ...
7
votes
1answer
218 views

Is “-landia” good Latin?

Several Latin names of modern countries end in -landia if the corresponding English name ends in -land: Islandia, Nederlandia, Irlandia, Thailandia, Finlandia (also Finnia). England has a much older ...
9
votes
1answer
111 views

Is cultura a future participle?

Some nouns derived from verbs look like future participles: cultura from colere, sepultura from sepelire, scriptura from scribere… These do not have a future meaning, but are merely names for ...
6
votes
3answers
289 views

Using the -tim suffix

I am looking for some guidelines for using the -tim suffix in the sense "one by one". Some examples: guttatim, nominatim, paul(l)atim, syllabatim, viritim. (It seems that this is not the only use of ...
8
votes
2answers
397 views

When should the preposition *cum* be added as a suffix?

I was reading Plautus and came across quacum, which set in motion a few observations: Most beginning Latinists are familiar with the following constructions with first- and second- person and ...
14
votes
2answers
524 views

What is the difference between -us and -io?

One can derive nouns from verbs by attaching -us or -io to the perfect participle stem. For example, movere gives rise to motus (fourth declension) and motio. The meanings of these derived words are ...
8
votes
0answers
414 views

Unde “-cundus”?

I have learned that there is a suffix -cundus, found in words like fecundus, jucundus/jocundus, and rubicundus, which means something like "full of" or "characterized by." It seems to often be ...