Questions tagged [substantivum]

For questions about nouns.

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0answers
139 views

What is known about the feminine natural gender for trees in classical Latin?

It is a well known fact of Latin grammar, that trees follow natural gender and are always feminine, even when the word form would suggest masculine gender, as in populus "poplar". What does motivate ...
3
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3answers
209 views

What did σκάλα exactly mean in Byzantine Greek?

In Spanish we have a word escala that means "stopover" as "a break in a journey", specially when travelling by sea. According to the dictionary by the Royal Spanish Academy, the word comes from ...
3
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2answers
109 views

How do you address someone in a case other than the vocative?

Suppose I'm talking to someone directly, and use a pronoun to refer to someone. I would use tu or vōs with an appropriate case based on its role in the sentence: for example, sciō tē adesse, "I know ...
3
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2answers
107 views

Can “ave, vire” be used colloquially as “hey, bro”?

There's a Spanish webcomic called ¡Eh, tío!, an expression that can be translated into English as hey, man or maybe as hey, bro. The webcomic had some time ago a story arc set in an alternate universe ...
2
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2answers
162 views

Did the word “citione” meaning “bump in the head” exist in Latin?

In the Spanish language site someone asked about the etymology of the word chichón (link in Spanish), meaning bump (typically in the head as a result of a hit). The most common theory is that it is ...
2
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1answer
94 views

Is the third person passive perfect of a verb a source of nouns, e.g. “benedictus” from “bendico”?

I always get confused with benedictus. It Christian prayers, it is found both as a noun and as a (passive) verb, e.g. benedictus est. When est is omitted (not uncommon in Latin, it seems), both look ...
2
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1answer
46 views

How to determine the ending of a Latin noun?

In LLPSI, I have seen Latin be Latina, Latinum, and Latinae. What are the differences of these words and how do I determine which to use?
2
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1answer
79 views

Is the word nihilanus/nihilumanus properly constructed? (From “nihil/nihilum” meaning “nothing” and the suffix “-anus” to denote origin)

I've been reading that the word silvanus comes from Latin silva (“forest”) +‎ -ānus (“from, of the”). So, "silvanus" literally means something like "who comes from the forest" or something similar. I ...

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