Questions tagged [spanish]

For questions related to Spanish, including but not limited to: Latin etymology of words, as well as translations between Latin and Spanish (in either direction)

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13
votes
3answers
671 views

A Dios rogando y con el mazo dando

tl;dr I want a Latin motto conveying the idea that you have to ask God for something while at the same time pursuing it. I have two Spanish sayings that work pretty well I have a couple of Latin ...
12
votes
2answers
2k views

If arm is 'arma', why is unarmed 'inermis' and not 'inarmis'?

I came across the Spanish word 'inerme', which comes from Latin inermis and means unarmed. Since the Latin word for arm is 'arma' and the preffix 'in' indicates negation, it is clear that the form '...
6
votes
2answers
226 views

Identifying corrupted Sappho fragment or mention of Sappho found in just-newly-found-online Spanish edition of Sappho

OK, so this question is perhaps somewhat weird, but I have no idea where to start, so here I am. Let me give some introduction. Me, languages, and Greek Let's start very far back. As my blog ...
11
votes
2answers
924 views

Is it possible to predict the gender of nouns?

As you are probably aware, Spanish owes a significant portion of its vocabulary to Latin. An interesting difference however is that Spanish has only two genders for nouns - feminine and masculine. The ...
6
votes
1answer
249 views

Vicis - no singular nominative?

I read that vicis has no singular nominative, but it does have a plural one - vices. I find this very interesting, but hard to understand. It is like if the ontological configuration of space-time ...
8
votes
2answers
789 views

Did the Vulgar Latin verb "toccare" exist?

According to the Royal Spanish Academy dictionary, the word tocar 'touch' has its origin in the toc toc onomatopoeia. Something similar is registered in Etymonline for the English verb touch: from ...
4
votes
2answers
148 views

Can one create a diminutive of a truncated form of "frater"?

In Spanish we have the word mano for hermano ("brother"), and that form can give the diminutive manito, when the brother is very small (less than one). In Latin, like in Italian, it might be possible ...