Questions tagged [sentence-translation]

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7
votes
1answer
260 views

Struggling to translate “iuvenum” in a sentence

I'm struggling with the translation of the following sentence: Praeterea quinque milia iuvenum iussu principis magna voce plaudere debebant. It is not clear to me what to do with the word iuvenum, ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

Shorter translation of “As above, so below”

The phrase As above, so below was first attested in Arabic, and has a medieval Latin translation: Quod est superius est sicut quod inferius, et quod inferius est sicut quod est superius. That which ...
6
votes
1answer
337 views

What does 'non minus stultum quam impium' mean?

I find this phrase on the Wikipedia page of Julian of Eclanum and it is about the Anti-Pelaganism dogma (Julan was strongly against that dogma). From the words I think the dogma is "wicked ...
2
votes
2answers
84 views

Translation help: Prospero Mandosio on Ottavio Durante

Preliminary note It was suggested I could split the question into several questions. If the community thinks this is a better approach, do let me know in the comments, and I will split it into two or ...
3
votes
1answer
86 views

Confusing translation for Euler

In this sentence from Euler's De Serie Lambertina, I'm having trouble deciphering the meaning (§ 20, p. 40): At vero quomodo vicissim series Lambertina ad aequationem trinomialem perduci queat, ...
4
votes
3answers
159 views

Translating “The joy of understanding is the highest/greatest pleasure”

I'm self-taught Latin student and I wanted to translate the following sentence: The joy of understanding is the highest/greatest pleasure. I used the word "highest" there because I wanted ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Translation Request, English to Latin

How can I translate this sentence to Latin, "Man in the palace! Remember death, live with fear of death. Leave us alone." I translate like that but... I don't know, I guess, I did a mistake. ...
5
votes
1answer
305 views

'i have never made' in latin

I've tried to search for this phrase, but I haven't found an answer. I looked it up on google translate and it says 'nunquam fecit.' I don't think it's correct.
2
votes
1answer
384 views

Do these two phrases mean something different?

I need assistance in correctly identifying which statement makes sense: Nostrae Cor Jesu Fons Sapientiae or Nostrae Cor Iesu Fons Sapientiae There is a debate that the second statement is the correct ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

“Life decreed better!” in Latin

Sort of, related to my another qestion. I am looking for mo secular (for the lack of a better word) version of a phrase "Di melius!". While I know that deus could be interpreted as "...
4
votes
1answer
90 views

Is “Heaven decreed better!” a correct translation for “Di melius!”

The phrase Di melius! comes from Letter 98 of Moral letters to Lucilius, original text can be found here. The translation Heaven decreed better! is by Richard M. Gummere Ph.D. More comprehensive ...
2
votes
2answers
140 views

I'm trying to translate or verify a quote from Terry Pratchett: “Ab Hoc Possum Videre Domum Tuum - I Can See Your House From Here”

The What and a bit of Why, in short: I'm trying to translate the phrase "I can see your house from (up) here" to use it as a motto for a "Lodge"/"Order" I'm a member of, ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

How do I say “Remember death, but do not forget to live” in Latin?

it's been a few years since I was in a Latin class, but I've been wanting to get a tattoo in the language for a while now, and "Remember death, but do not forget to live" is the phrase I've ...
4
votes
2answers
387 views

Meaning of “Videre Sed Non Videri”

What is the meaning of “Videre Sed Non Videri”? I already search on Google on pages like: mymemory.translated But results are confusing me, and my knowledge on Latin language is zero. Thanks in ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

“Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about.” in Latin

What would be the proper Latin translation of: Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about. The author of the quote is uncertain and, as far as I can see, it is not a proverb or a ...
3
votes
1answer
179 views

Closest equivalent of “Don't get mad, get even” in Latin

I am looking for the closest equivalents of the following phrase in Latin: Don't get mad, get even. Preferably not a word-by-word translation, but an 'established' phrase or proverb.
1
vote
2answers
64 views

Translating “beautiful things exist to be understood”

I'm trying to translate the sentence "Beautiful things exist to be understood." I believe "Res pulchrae intellegendus sunt" is quite close, but I think the sentence would sound ...
5
votes
2answers
255 views

How to translate “the great mistress/ruleress of the world/worlds” in Latin?

I'm trying to translate both phrases "the great (female) ruler of the WORLD" and "the great (female) ruler of the WORLDS" in to Latin. So, the latter phrase is otherwise the same ...
5
votes
1answer
610 views

Translation of “Mors dolorum omnium exsolutio est et finis”

What is the proper translation of the phrase (though, I am not sure it is a complete phrase): Mors dolorum omnium exsolutio est et finis As far as I can see, this is an excerpt from section 19 from ...
3
votes
1answer
95 views

Clarifications regarding translation of the phrase “Id agendum est ut satis vixerimus”

I am looking for lineal translation (or rather some clarifications) of a phrase from Letter 23 of Moral letters to Lucilius: Id agendum est ut satis vixerimus (I have found the Latin original here) ...
2
votes
1answer
268 views

How to translate a variant of 'Per aspera ad astra'

How would you translate 'through the will of man to the stars' or 'through the indomitable human spirit to the stars'(more accurately, the latter)? Of course, I'm not looking for a literal translation,...
7
votes
1answer
166 views

Can Veneti and Antuerpiae be vocatives?

I am puzzling over: caveat veneti et antuerpiae exemplo tiri et tu lundina This was written in the margin of a sixteenth-century commentary on Isaiah at chapter 23, which is on Tyre. My translation ...
2
votes
2answers
104 views

Translation request: that which has no remedy, is is already remedied

That is meant to say "that which is unfixable is already fixed" or "if there is no solution, there is no point in worrying about it." (is it ok to ask for a translation like so? ...
9
votes
2answers
327 views

“Interdum sane, qui cogitare se dicit nondum constitutum sibi certi quidquam fatetur”

In the Thesaurus of Iohannes Matthias Gesnerus under cogito: (clearer link) inter cogitare et deliberare hoc interest, cogitare est dubitare, deliberare, confirmare. Haec Nonius 5,28. Interdum sane, ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Translating “may turn into this”

I need some help to translate a phrase: That which was fabric/woven, may turn/become/transform into this My partner gave me some time ago, a handmade bracelet made from fabric, symbolising our ...
1
vote
0answers
106 views

Eppur si muove word-to-word translation [closed]

It is translated on wikipedia as "Yet it moves", Galileo Galile's words against court. But If we translate it word-to-word what does it mean?
3
votes
1answer
185 views

Agreement and possessive genitive

What we do in the following example? I need to combine two words in a phrase: 'professional' and 'holiday'. There is no adjective 'professional' in Latin or my searching is bad. So I can use the ...
3
votes
0answers
103 views

What fresh hell is this?

“What fresh hell is this?” is a question frequently uttered (or so it has been reported) by writer Dorothy Parker, on such occasions as when the doorbell or the telephone rang, expressing her ...
4
votes
2answers
220 views

Sentence translation “ … videat, annon implacabilem Deum quoque sit experturus”

In De differentiis verborum, under the entry of Clemens, Pompa contrasts that word with placidus, and right afterwards writes: Sed implacidus, qui nullo placamine ad placabilitatem promovetur, ut se ...
2
votes
1answer
99 views

sentence analysis - usage of ambo

In the beginning of the first Dialogue ("Surrectio Matutina") in Linguae Latinae Exercitatio of Juan Luis Vives we read: Beatrix: Jesus Christus exuscitet vos a somno vitiorum. Heus pueri estis ne ...
4
votes
1answer
173 views

Inaccurate translation of phrases in Latin with word “defender”

I'm trying to translate the following words to Latin (see blockquote). And I've used various translation tools, but I have a strong feeling it's inaccurate. These ones I would like to have correctly ...
6
votes
2answers
237 views

Deciphering a sentence

I have just encountered this sentence from an old book, however I can't understand it. not only I can't understand 3 words in bold, but also the entire sentence I can't make up. Alia vero multo ...
4
votes
1answer
386 views

How to say 'I am myself'?

I'm still figuring out the difference between the various ways to say 'I', 'me', and 'myself' in Latin. My best guess for this phrase is 'Ego sum memet', but I'm not sure which case the second word ...
2
votes
2answers
176 views

What is the Latin translation for the “reply or your mother will die” meme?

What is the Latin translation of the meme, Reply to this post or your mother will die in her sleep tonight. I intend to put it in a lorem ipsum to see if anyone notices. I know lorem ipsum texts ...
3
votes
1answer
285 views

How do I translate “Eternal light guide me”?

Am a guy, planning to get this tattooed and coming from a Latin-illiterate background (never studied Latin in my life). Context: to remind me of God's guidance throughout my life and to continue to ...
6
votes
3answers
378 views

grammar of “sapientiae tuae non est numerus”

in Confessions we read: magnus es, domine, et laudabilis valde. magna virtus tua et sapientiae tuae non est numerus. while the meaning is quite clear, I can't clearly resolve the literal ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

Ethics of Spinoza - Question about Translation

Spinoza, Ethics, De Dei, Propositio 15, Scholium: Si igitur ipsi ex suo hoc absurdo concludere tamen volunt substantiam extensam debere esse finitam, nihil aliud hercle faciunt quam si quis ex eo ...
1
vote
3answers
150 views

Translation of “Too many people have opinions on things they know nothing about. And the more ignorant they are, the more opinions they have.”

Can anyone provide an accurate translation for this quote? I would try to do it myself, but my Latin knowledge is limited as I am still learning.
5
votes
1answer
952 views

May they rest in peace

This may become an inscription written on a historical marker commemorating a mass grave. Which of the following is correct: Requiesce in Pace or Requiescant in Pace? The former was offered up by a ...
3
votes
1answer
372 views

“If you can breath, you can stand. If you can stand, you can fight.”

I'm trying to help my sister. She heard this phrase that she like to have tattooed but she wanted it to be in Latin. Now I haven't been practicing for a few years so I could use with some help. The ...
11
votes
3answers
7k views

How do you translate “Don't Fear the Reaper” into Latin?

In T. Pratchett's Discworld series, Death's motto is "Non Timetis Messor", meant to be a translation of "Don't Fear the Reaper". But in other books he uses "Timetere", and I am unsure of which would ...
7
votes
1answer
365 views

“Opusculum hoc, quamdiu vixero, doctioribus emendandum offero.”?

I found the following quote at the beginning of a book on Indo-European linguistics: "Opusculum hoc, quamdiu vixero, doctioribus emendandum offero." (Iunius, Observationes) I'm trying to ...
2
votes
2answers
95 views

What is the best Latin translation for “Love and intellect will prevail”?

How do we say " Love and intellect will prevail" in Latin? Thank you very much for your time.
3
votes
4answers
3k views

Does this sentence I constructed with my junior high school latin work? I write online advertising and want to come off as snobby as possible

Essentially, I want to say something like: "If you read this, your will will be mine". (In a teasing way like, Who Reads This Is Stupid). I 'distilled' it as much as possible to "reader beware: your ...
2
votes
1answer
96 views

Classical Greek for 'You came home to our hearts with your shield'?

Sorry I know this is Latin. but I was hoping to find some dual classicists on here. Could anyone provide me with a classical Greek translation of the sentence: "You came home to our hearts with your ...
7
votes
3answers
269 views

Is this a question or an affirmation?

Reading the Digest (6th century, copy of 9th century), I find this sentence: Sed si plures servum percusserint, utrum omnes quasi occiderint teneantur videamus. One author who established the text ...
5
votes
2answers
586 views

Sentences with no verb, but an ablative

Sometimes I will run across sentences that have no verb, but there is an ablative and I am not sure about the right approach to assuming a verb. For example, in this 16th century sentence: Erat ...
3
votes
1answer
207 views

Grammar of “Nec huic publico, ut opinantur, malo turba tantum et imprudens uulgus ingemuit”

I'm a novice trying to learn Latin, and I hope this question is appropriate to this forum (please let me know if it is not the case). I tried to read this section from De Brevitate Vitae (text here):...
3
votes
2answers
174 views

How do I translate “Putting many ducks into space”?

I'm trying to find how to say "Putting many ducks into space" in the most proper way, but I have very little experience in Latin and so the different forms of words are somewhat confusing to me. What ...
0
votes
3answers
161 views

Meaning of “amore honora, libertatem cura” [closed]

What is the closest meaning of this statement? Single comma there is intentional, it's not an enumeration. I understand that liberty cures, but struggling to connect the two words in first part.