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Questions tagged [relative-pronouns]

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quid vs. quod difference [closed]

as far as I understand, quid is an interrogative pronoun but seemingly both quid (/quis) and quod (/quí) are relative pronouns. Do I understand that right? Why do I find so many examples of "quid&...
CasualTea's user avatar
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When does a Latin relative pronoun get "attracted" into the case of its antecedent?

Generally, a relative pronoun agrees with its antecedent in gender and number, while its case is determined by its grammatical function in the relative clause, e.g. Do pecuniam filio [dat.] quem [acc....
brianpck's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
278 views

What is the difference between quo and quando as relative pronoun?

Genesis 2:4 reads as follows in the Latin Vulgate: Istae sunt generationes caeli et terrae, quando creata sunt, in die quo fecit Dominus Deus caelum et terram Quo and quando were used both as a ...
Sean's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
871 views

Why "quod" and not "quo" is used here?

In chapter XXII of Lingua latina per se illustrata: Colloquia Personarum, I have read the following sentence (emphasis mine in the word I find difficult to understand): Hic anulus ex auro puro factus ...
Charo's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
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"Vilicae quae sunt officia"

Vilicae quae sunt officia, curato faciat. It is taken from De Agri Cultura, 143.1, and I found an English translation: See that the housekeeper performs all her duties. Faciat is singular, ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
515 views

Unsure why the accusative relative pronoun is used? [Tacitus Annals 2.24]

I hope this is the right place to ask this, and I hope it seems I have done enough research before asking. Basically, I am working my way through translating Tacitus' Annals, and have come across ...
fdvries's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
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Usage of quidquid: "dominetur piscibus aquatilibus ... et quidquid in terra movetur"

In Gen. 1:26 by Sebastian Castellio: ita fatur: Faciamus hominem ad imaginem nostram, nostri similem, qui dominetur piscibus aquatilibus, volucribus aereis, pecudibus, denique toti terrae, et ...
d_e's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
328 views

Why no relative pronoun in ἄνθρωπος ἐξηραμμένην ἔχων τὴν χεῖρα?

Mark 3:1 has: Καὶ εἰσῆλθεν πάλιν εἰς συναγωγήν, καὶ ἦν ἐκεῖ ἄνθρωπος ἐξηραμμένην ἔχων τὴν χεῖρα. In English word order, the final part seems like it would be "a man his hand had had withering.&...
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4 votes
1 answer
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Can the ablative of agent and a relative pronoun be used at the same time?

Here is an example of an ablative of agent for living things: "Puella a puero amata" = the girl loved by the boy But is it correct if I add a relative pronoun to form: "Puella quae a ...
Vince's user avatar
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Can 'quod' refer to the previous speaker?

It is quite common to start a Latin sentence with quod, referring to the matter discussed in the previous sentence. In a dialogue, can one use it to refer to the previous thing even if it was uttered ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
149 views

Redundancy of “quo” with “de”

Passage: “Quo de genere mortis difficile dictu est.” Cic. Amic. 12 English translation (from Loeb): “It is hard to speak of the nature of his death.” French translation : “Quant à la nature de sa ...
Felix Nescienti's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
207 views

How did "what" become "because"?

Two of the most common words for "because" in Latin are quod and quia, both of which began as neuter forms of quī "who". (At some point quia got replaced with the feminine plural quae, though I don't ...
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5 votes
2 answers
264 views

How to find the object of reference of a latin relative pronoun?

In De Bello Gallico, book 1, chapter 1, it starts as follows: Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres, quarum unam incolunt Belgae, aliam Aquitani, tertiam qui ipsorum lingua Celtae, nostra Galli ...
Lalo's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
734 views

Concerning the use of relative pronouns

The relative pronoun quem in the following seems to function in a way that I wouldn't normally associate with relative pronouns: Et accipiens puerum, statuit eum in medio eorum: quem cum complexus ...
Expedito Bipes's user avatar
12 votes
3 answers
1k views

Is the female accusative singular relative pronoun quem or quam?

This grid on Wiktionary gives quem for the singular feminine accusative of the relative pronoun quis. According to books by Kennedy, Gwynne and Henry Cullen this should be quam. Please can you tell ...
Gail Foad's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
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What is the difference between "ubi" and "in quo" as relative adverbs?

Let's start with some example sentences: This is the house where I was born. Ecce domus ubi natus sum. This is the house in which I was born. Ecce domus in qua natus sum. Both sentences ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
201 views

Why is the relative pronoun put in the dative case? why feminine? (Greek)

I was a little stumped, here, when I came across the feminine relative pronoun ᾗ. ἴσως δή, εἶπον, παρὰ τὸ ἔθος γελοῖα ἂν φαίνοιτο πολλὰ περὶ τὰ νῦν λεγόμενα, εἰ πράξεται ᾗ λέγεται. καὶ μάλα, ἔφη. ...
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6 votes
2 answers
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Is a relative pronoun commonly used as a third person pronoun? (Metamorphoses I.583-587)

In this short passage by Ovid, the pronoun "quam" seems to be used as a third person pronoun. Inachus unus abest imoque reconditus antro fletibus auget aquas natamque miserrimus Io luget ut ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Can a relative adjective begin a conditional statement in Attic Greek?

In my textbook, there's a chapter on conditional relative clauses, in which it explains how relative pronouns and adverbs, especially when they are indefinite, can form the protasis of a conditional ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
183 views

Is ūnō a relative pronoun in this sentence?

I can't understand what ūnō means in this sentence, or what grammatical role it provides: uxor quae bona est ūnō uirō est contenta. The sentence is from page 70 of A Latin Grammar by James ...
Luke Sheppard's user avatar
8 votes
4 answers
920 views

Pyramus et Thisbe: did their parents forbid what they could not? Ovid, Metamorphoses IV.61

The Latin Library has the following punctuation for lines 60–62 of book IV of Ovid's Metamorphoses, describing how Pyramus and Thisbe fell in love but were forbidden from marrying by their parents: ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
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Indefinite relative clauses in indirect discourse

What is the most idiomatic way of expressing in Latin a sentence containing an indirect statement, which itself contains an indefinite relative clause? To start with the direct version: consider a ...
TKR's user avatar
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