Skip to main content

Questions tagged [reflexive-pronoun]

The pronoun "se", which can be translated either as "himself", "herself" or "itself", depending on the context.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
14 votes
3 answers
633 views

How to resolve ambiguity with reflexive pronouns

A comment to an answer of this question mentions that ambiguity can arise with a reflexive pronoun when both the independent clause and the clause with the reflexive pronoun have third-person subjects....
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.5k
8 votes
2 answers
5k views

Libera te tutemet ex inferis vs. Libera temet [ipsum] ab inferis?

In a movie (Event Horizon, spoilers ahead), you have this Latin phrase they think they heard and what it ends up being : Liberate me... Libera te tutemet (ex inferis). There's always the ...
user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
140 views

Position of reflexive pronouns

In Allen and Greenough all the examples of reflexive pronouns have them come before the verb, but Pliny the Younger in e.g. letter 6.20.11 has 'non moratus ultra proripit se effusoque cursu...' and ...
G. Lewis's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
124 views

Unnecessary genitive being used with 'suum'

I am not sure how to translate Augustus affirmāvit genūs suum ab Iove ortum esse. One can logically conclude that this much of the sentence is correct... Augustus affirmed that ... ...
user062295's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
95 views

"Eidem suae": a way to make the reflexive pronoun refer to someone other than the subject?

(A tangent off this speculative answer to a question about a sentence containing the words eidem suae.) Does the apparently redundant phrase eidem suae ("to his/her/its own same") provide a way to ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
  • 15.9k
7 votes
1 answer
487 views

"Middle constructions" in Latin?

I was wondering how so-called "middle constructions" like the English ones exemplified in (1), which are typically translated with a reflexive verb in Romance languages (e.g., see the Catalan examples ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,911
7 votes
0 answers
469 views

How things change in Latin

After having provided an answer to Draconis’ question ( Did Latin have any ergative verbs? ), I was wondering about the subtle meaning differences involved in triads like {aperit/se aperit/aperitur}, ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,911
6 votes
1 answer
124 views

How would I emphasize a definite noun? (Greek)

Suppose I want to be particularly emphatic about a noun: "the Fates themselves must have turned against me!" In Latin, I'd use some form of ipse; in Greek, my first instinct is αὐτός. But I've also ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.6k
6 votes
1 answer
839 views

What does the -met ending mean in "vosmet" or "temet"

I don't understand where vosmet and temet came from. I know vos and te as pronouns, but what is the -met ending? Is that from some other language? Is it used anywhere else? It seems irregular. Why ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 7,001
5 votes
4 answers
1k views

How one can say "The door opened" in Latin?

I'm interested in knowing all the possible grammatical (i.e. morphosyntactic) ways to express the perfect construction "The door opened" in Latin. It seems to me that, in this case, a ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,911
5 votes
1 answer
207 views

Why is a reflexive pronoun the subject of this genitive absolute? (Greek)

ἑαυτοῦ δὲ προσελθόντος εἰπεῖν ὅτι δέοι αὐτὸν ἄγγελον ἀνθρώποις γενέσθαι τῶν ἐκεῖ καὶ διακελεύοιντό οἱ ἀκούειν τε καὶ θεᾶσθαι πάντα τὰ ἐν τῷ τόπῳ. (My translation) And when Er approached, [the ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 12k
5 votes
1 answer
173 views

Servus dominum orabat ne se verbera–

Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata, cap. XXVIII, pensum A (p. 230) begins by asking the reader to fill in the blank in this sentence, with the appropriate conjunctive imperfect conjugation: Servus ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
  • 15.9k
4 votes
1 answer
199 views

Why is "se" used with "secum" in this quote from Livy?

In this quote from Livy (6.8.6): "ita quocumque se intulisset victoriam secum haud dubiam trahebat." "thus, in whatever direction he went, he carried certain victory with him." ...
tony's user avatar
  • 8,772
3 votes
2 answers
119 views

Antecedent of a Greek pronoun in the Critias

I was reading through Plato's (incomplete) Critias yesterday and came across the following passage: δίκης δὴ κλήροις τὸ φίλον λαγχάνοντες κατῴκιζον τὰς χώρας, καὶ κατοικίσαντες, οἷον νομῆς ποίμνια, ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.5k
3 votes
1 answer
108 views

Summa Theologiae - se extendit

Summa Theologiae, Ia q. 14 a. 11 co.: Et ideo aliter dicendum est, quod, cum Deus sit causa rerum per suam scientiam, ut dictum est, intantum se extendit scientia Dei, inquantum se extendit eius ...
Ali Nikzad's user avatar
  • 1,567
3 votes
1 answer
1k views

Translate "Quiet your mind"

I want a proper translation for the English sentence: "Quiet your mind" and also "Quiet yourself" I mean this in the sense of calming your mind and yourself. I want this to be translated as a ...
Mads's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes
0 answers
155 views

Do imperatives trigger reflexive pronouns in Latin?

In English, imperative verbs have "invisible subjects": syntactically, they act like there's an invisible pronoun in the subject position. This is why we see look closely at yourself instead of *look ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.6k
2 votes
0 answers
92 views

Could the vulgar verb "toccari" have existed in Vulgar Latin?

As a follow-up of the previous interesting question (Did the Vulgar Latin verb "toccare" exist? ), could the vulgar Vulgar Latin verb toccari (in the sense of the deponent verb masturbari) ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,911