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Questions tagged [pronouns]

For questions about pronouns.

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When to use a genitive pronoun instead of a possessive adjective

The genitive form of the personal pronouns (e.g. mei, tui, nostri, nostrum, etc.) seem to occur fairly often in the following contexts: Partitive genitive: to indicate a part of some whole. Quis ...
brianpck's user avatar
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8 votes
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The function of "quo" in "Quō quisque est sollertior, hōc docet īrācundius"

In A&G on indefinite pronouns there are two sentences of a similar structure: Bonus liber melior est quisque quō mâior. (The larger a good book is, the better.) Quō quisque est sollertior, hōc ...
d_e's user avatar
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45 votes
2 answers
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Why is "ille" used in Winnie ille Pu and Hobbitus Ille?

I learned early on that Latin has no articles. So why is it, then, that Winnie the Pooh and The Hobbit are translated Winnie ille Pu and Hobbitus Ille? Wouldn't it be more correct to not translate ...
Nathaniel is protesting's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
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What is the difference between suus and eius?

What is the difference between the possessive adjective suus (his, hers, its, theirs) (and its declensions) and the genitive, possessive pronoun eius (of her, of him, of it)? Can these words be ...
Geremia's user avatar
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Reference with hic, is and ille

Consider this example: Ecce Marcus et Gaius. Hic canit, ille auscultat. Here are Marcus and Gaius. The latter sings, the former listens. When there are two or more things one could refer to, hic ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
579 views

Where did the missing forms of nemo go?

The pronoun nemo is usually said to have only nominative, accusative and dative forms (nemo, neminem, nemini). The other forms, including plural, are easy to form, since nemo seems to come from ne+...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
95 views

"Eidem suae": a way to make the reflexive pronoun refer to someone other than the subject?

(A tangent off this speculative answer to a question about a sentence containing the words eidem suae.) Does the apparently redundant phrase eidem suae ("to his/her/its own same") provide a way to ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
14 votes
3 answers
1k views

Why is suus in the accusative feminine singular in this sentence?

I'm a very new Latin learner - I'm using Lingua Latina as my primary text to become fluent in reading (with the 'college' supplement and other texts for additional clarification). I'm on chapter 6 (...
Dave Johnson's user avatar
14 votes
1 answer
242 views

Why does "e" occur in forms of 'vōs' but not 'nōs'?

The forms of nōs and vōs exhibit a pattern, except in the genitive (nostrī/um, vestrī/um) and the possessive (noster, vester). Did vōs originally resemble nōs in all its forms, only to diverge later? ...
Slade's user avatar
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12 votes
3 answers
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What do "hic" and "ille" refer to in this passage from Ovid's Tristia?

In Ovid's Tristia, 1.2.23–4: ...Nihil est, nisi pontus et aer, Nubibus hic tumidus, fluctibus ille minax... As far as I can tell, this means ...There is nothing, unless the sea and air ...
user avatar
12 votes
2 answers
573 views

Does Latin have a mechanism to disambiguate possessive pronouns of the same gender referring to distinct persons?

Question: does Latin have a grammatical mechanism to disambiguate the ambiguous use of `his' in the third of the three following English sentences? Person A wrote a book. Then person B wrote a ...
guest's user avatar
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9 votes
2 answers
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Comparing quicumque, quilibet, quisquis, quivis

The pronouns quicumque, quilibet, quisquis and quivis have a somewhat similar meaning, roughly "anyone". What exactly are their differences? The dictionary entries I have seen do not provide a clear ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
435 views

When is quis used instead of aliquis?

I definitely remember that one usually says: si quis veniret … and not: si aliquis veniret. But the recent question about quo quisque est sollertior and similar forms brought the following rule from ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
181 views

Why is -d used instead of -m for most neuter pronouns

There is a notable set of pronouns that use -d for the neuter nominative and accusative: iste > istud ille > illud quis > quid is > id Other pronouns do not: hic > hoc ipse > ipsum (though L&S ...
brianpck's user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
244 views

Why is "quī" used immediately following a plural accusative noun?

In Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata, chapter 6, exercise 5.8, I see the sentence: Dominus verberat servōs ____ nōn pārent. Since servōs is accusative, I put quōs in the blank. But the answer key ...
Nathaniel is protesting's user avatar
8 votes
0 answers
119 views

Does the indefinite pronoun/determiner "quă" only exist as an enclitic?

I recently learned that there is an indefinite determiner and pronoun quă used in the feminine nominative singular and neuter nominative/accusative plural with the sense "any(one)" (...
Asteroides's user avatar
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8 votes
6 answers
9k views

Is there a gender-neutral pronoun for people in Latin?

Sometimes it is preferable to leave a person's gender undisclosed and some people do not fall into the usual two gender categories. This requires some adaptations in languages that indicate gender in ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
856 views

What's the difference between *quisquis* and *quicumque*?

Quisquis and quicumque are both described as indefinite (or generic) relative pronouns, and are both defined in dictionaries as "whoever, everyone who...". Is there any difference at all between the ...
TKR's user avatar
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7 votes
3 answers
1k views

Confused about the use of "quae" as an interrogative word

Sometimes, I read that "quae" could be used, not only as a relative word, but also as an interrogative word. Sometimes I read that it's not like that in the correct usage. Quote, from a fellow Latin ...
Quidam's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
657 views

What is the etymology of 'cuius' and is it different from 'quis'?

'cuius' (and 'cui') is an interesting word in that it stands out as different from the other terms in the declension of 'quis'. It seems to be pronounced differently. 'quis' is /kwis/ but 'cuius' is /...
Mitch's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
174 views

How to indicate gender of ambiguous pronoun antecedent

Consider the following sentence (a little contrived, but you can imagine a better example...): Do you like their friends? -I only like her friends. The obvious word-for-word translation does not ...
brianpck's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
456 views

Mors mea or mors meī?

If I wanted to talk about "the death of Caesar", I wouldn't think twice about using the genitive (mors Caesaris). But if you asked me what sort of genitive this is—possessive, partitive, or objective—...
Draconis's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is ipsum/ipsa/ipse a third person pronoun, or can it serve other functions?

This question was inspired by a comment to an answer on this question: How would you say “same thing” in Latin? In which an answerer translated "Utinam idem sentires ac ipsa/ipse sentio!" as "If ...
Sola Gratia's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
270 views

Is 'hoc' ever pronounced short?

I have learned that the neuter nominative and accusative hoc is actually pronounced as if it were hocc. But was it exclusively hocc? Was it ever pronounced as the hoc that it looks like in the ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
177 views

How do you address someone in a case other than the vocative?

Suppose I'm talking to someone directly, and use a pronoun to refer to someone. I would use tu or vōs with an appropriate case based on its role in the sentence: for example, sciō tē adesse, "I know ...
Draconis's user avatar
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