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Questions tagged [pronomina]

For questions about pronouns.

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1answer
333 views

What do I do when a pronoun refers to both a male and a female?

I'm trying to refer to a couple (man and woman), with a pronoun. Specifically what I'm trying to write is: Consider a couple that comes to Rome. They may have pride for Rome. What I have now is: ...
6
votes
2answers
261 views

Mors mea or mors meī?

If I wanted to talk about "the death of Caesar", I wouldn't think twice about using the genitive (mors Caesaris). But if you asked me what sort of genitive this is—possessive, partitive, or objective—...
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0answers
37 views

Quispiam, quisquam, quivis, quidam, quilibet?

Including the variations with qualis, quantus and quotus, is there a specific rule to when to use each these undefined pronouns?
4
votes
2answers
275 views

“Felix est rex is quem omnes cives amant”. Is the pronoun “is” necessary?

Considering the original phrase: The king who all citizens love is happy. (Portuguese: Feliz é o rei a quem todos os cidadãos amam.) Here is a proposed Latin translation: Felix est rex ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

Is 'hoc' ever pronounced short?

I have learned that the neuter nominative and accusative hoc is actually pronounced as if it were hocc. But was it exclusively hocc? Was it ever pronounced as the hoc that it looks like in the ...
3
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1answer
50 views

Pairs like quot/tot and quantum/tantum

There seem to be a lot of pairs of words in Latin where a "question" starts with qu- and the corresponding "answer" by t-. For example: quot/tot, quantum/tantum, qualis/talis, quotiens/totiens. The ...
5
votes
1answer
99 views

Why do some pronoun nominatives look like vocatives?

The forms ipse, ille, and iste look like vocatives instead of nominatives, and one would expect to see ipsus, illus, and istus instead. In fact, ipsus is attested but far rarer than ipse, but the ...
2
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0answers
72 views

Why ĭdem instead of iddem or īdem in neuter?

The pronoun idem/eadem/idem appears to be the combination of is/ea/id and -dem. I can understand why isdem > īdem in the masculine, but why do we have iddem > ĭdem? Shouldn't the vowel be ...
5
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3answers
125 views

Can aliquis function as an adjective?

Aliquis is typically a pronoun, but can it also function as an adjective like aliqui? For example, aliqui homo currit versus aliquis homo currit.
5
votes
2answers
264 views

What is the difference between “ubi” and “in quo” as relative adverbs?

Let's start with some example sentences: This is the house where I was born. Ecce domus ubi natus sum. This is the house in which I was born. Ecce domus in qua natus sum. Both sentences ...
12
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2answers
403 views

Does Latin have a mechanism to disambiguate possessive pronouns of the same gender referring to distinct persons?

Question: does Latin have a grammatical mechanism to disambiguate the ambiguous use of `his' in the third of the three following English sentences? Person A wrote a book. Then person B wrote a ...
6
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1answer
163 views

What does the -met ending mean in “vosmet” or “temet”

I don't understand where vosmet and temet came from. I know vos and te as pronouns, but what is the -met ending? Is that from some other language? Is it used anywhere else? It seems irregular. Why ...
7
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1answer
99 views

How can “everyone” be singular or plural?

I don't understand how quisque and quique are different. How can a pronoun referring to all people be singular or plural? In which situations would one use either of these?
8
votes
1answer
64 views

Why is -d used instead of -m for most neuter pronouns

There is a notable set of pronouns that use -d for the neuter nominative and accusative: iste > istud ille > illud quis > quid is > id Other pronouns do not: hic > hoc ipse > ipsum (though L&S ...
6
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1answer
64 views

Do adverbs derived from iste have a pejorative tone?

I would call the pronoun iste a "second person demonstrative pronoun"1, meaning roughly "that thing near you". It can also have a pejorative tone, implying that the speaker does not approve of the ...
7
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2answers
209 views

Is a relative pronoun commonly used as a third person pronoun? (Metamorphoses I.583-587)

In this short passage by Ovid, the pronoun "quam" seems to be used as a third person pronoun. Inachus unus abest imoque reconditus antro fletibus auget aquas natamque miserrimus Io luget ut ...
8
votes
1answer
80 views

Is there a difference between -vis and -libet?

The pronouns quivis and quilibet both mean "anyone", and utervis and uterlibet both mean "either one". The suffixes -vis and -libet seem to have a pretty similar effect. (I am not sure if there are ...
7
votes
1answer
71 views

Unnecessary genitive being used with 'suum'

I am not sure how to translate Augustus affirmāvit genūs suum ab Iove ortum esse. One can logically conclude that this much of the sentence is correct... Augustus affirmed that ... ...
7
votes
2answers
113 views

A question regarding the agreement of possessive pronouns

So I have the following to translate: Coronas pulchras filia mea parva portat. And the book answer is: My little daughter carries beautiful wreaths. But what I initially thought: The ...
7
votes
2answers
789 views

Expressing the relationship “his” in latin

So I have the following sentence which I have to translate into Latin: The farmer gives his daughter water. The parts which I found easy: Agricola ... aquam dat. I don't know how to express "his" ...
8
votes
1answer
430 views

Reference with hic, is and ille

Consider this example: Ecce Marcus et Gaius. Hic canit, ille auscultat. Here are Marcus and Gaius. The latter sings, the former listens. When there are two or more things one could refer to, hic ...
5
votes
2answers
112 views

How to indicate gender of ambiguous pronoun antecedent

Consider the following sentence (a little contrived, but you can imagine a better example...): Do you like their friends? -I only like her friends. The obvious word-for-word translation does not ...
14
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3answers
264 views

Why is suus in the accusative feminine singular in this sentence?

I'm a very new Latin learner - I'm using Lingua Latina as my primary text to become fluent in reading (with the 'college' supplement and other texts for additional clarification). I'm on chapter 6 (...
7
votes
1answer
107 views

“Us versus them” - opposite of “noster”?

Noster can mean "one of us" in a symbolic way; L&S mentions that noster eris "you will be one of us" was a set expression for welcoming a deserter into the army, for instance. The English ...
6
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1answer
601 views

Libera te tutemet ex inferis vs. Libera temet [ipsum] ab inferis?

In a movie (Event Horizon, spoilers ahead), you have this Latin phrase they think they heard and what it ends up being : Liberate me... Libera te tutemet (ex inferis). There's always the ...
4
votes
1answer
99 views

What does the clause “quae suae salvationis causa exstitit” mean?

I'm having difficulty parsing the following sentence from Alfonsi's Dialogi contra Iudaeos, particularly the clause in bold: Dies Dominica, dies, viz. resurrectionis, quae suae salvationis causa ...
5
votes
1answer
91 views

Can I combine a possessive pronoun and the genitive of a noun?

Today in chat we spoke briefly about an earlier discussion I had had with Cerberus in Latin. (In case you did not know, we have a chatroom for this site.) I realized that I do not know how to put both ...
12
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1answer
86 views

When did nouns and adjectives derived from pronouns appear?

Latin has some nouns and adjectives derived from pronouns: unicus, identitas, qualitas, neutralis… I have the impression that such derivations are mainly later than classical, but I do not ...
6
votes
2answers
138 views

Comparing quicumque, quilibet, quisquis, quivis

The pronouns quicumque, quilibet, quisquis and quivis have a somewhat similar meaning, roughly "anyone". What exactly are their differences? The dictionary entries I have seen do not provide a clear ...
5
votes
1answer
222 views

Where did the missing forms of nemo go?

The pronoun nemo is usually said to have only nominative, accusative and dative forms (nemo, neminem, nemini). The other forms, including plural, are easy to form, since nemo seems to come from ne+...
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1answer
183 views

When to use a genitive pronoun instead of a possessive adjective

The genitive form of the personal pronouns (e.g. mei, tui, nostri, nostrum, etc.) seem to occur fairly often in the following contexts: Partitive genitive: to indicate a part of some whole. Quis ...
5
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1answer
453 views

What is the difference between suus and eius?

What is the difference between the possessive adjective suus (his, hers, its, theirs) (and its declensions) and the genitive, possessive pronoun eius (of her, of him, of it)? Can these words be ...
7
votes
2answers
56 views

“Eidem suae”: a way to make the reflexive pronoun refer to someone other than the subject?

(A tangent off this speculative answer to a question about a sentence containing the words eidem suae.) Does the apparently redundant phrase eidem suae ("to his/her/its own same") provide a way to ...
12
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1answer
276 views

Do Possessive Pronouns Always Agree with the Thing Being Possessed?

I recently came across this sentence (a practice sentence with no given answer) in my Latin textbook: mare nostrum plurimos portus habet I translated this as 'The sea has most of our harbour.' ...
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2answers
1k views

Is there a gender-neutral pronoun for people in Latin?

Sometimes it is preferable to leave a person's gender undisclosed and some people do not fall into the usual two gender categories. This requires some adaptations in languages that indicate gender in ...
13
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1answer
155 views

Why does “e” occur in forms of 'vōs' but not 'nōs'?

The forms of nōs and vōs exhibit a pattern, except in the genitive (nostrī/um, vestrī/um) and the possessive (noster, vester). Did vōs originally resemble nōs in all its forms, only to diverge later? ...
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3answers
715 views

What do “hic” and “ille” refer to in this passage from Ovid's Tristia?

In Ovid's Tristia, 1.2.23–4: ...Nihil est, nisi pontus et aer, Nubibus hic tumidus, fluctibus ille minax... As far as I can tell, this means ...There is nothing, unless the sea and air ...
8
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1answer
164 views

When can *quis* be used as an adjective interrogative pronoun?

The interrogative pronouns quis and quī have me rather confused. I understand that quis is generally substantive, while quī is generally adjective. But Allen and Greenough (§148) indicate that quis ...
7
votes
1answer
217 views

What's the difference between *quisquis* and *quicumque*?

Quisquis and quicumque are both described as indefinite (or generic) relative pronouns, and are both defined in dictionaries as "whoever, everyone who...". Is there any difference at all between the ...
7
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2answers
94 views

Why is “quī” used immediately following a plural accusative noun?

In Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata, chapter 6, exercise 5.8, I see the sentence: Dominus verberat servōs ____ nōn pārent. Since servōs is accusative, I put quōs in the blank. But the answer key ...
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1answer
727 views

Why is “ille” used in Winnie ille Pu and Hobbitus Ille?

I learned early on that Latin has no articles. So why is it, then, that Winnie the Pooh and The Hobbit are translated Winnie ille Pu and Hobbitus Ille? Wouldn't it be more correct to not translate ...