Questions tagged [preposition]

For questions concerning prepositions, such as *ab, coram, cum, dē, ex, in,* &c.

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20
votes
1answer
3k views

Why "ex nihilo" instead of "e nihilo"?

I was helping a friend earlier with an English-to-Latin translation and we started talking about the prepositions "a(b)" and "e(x)", which lose their consonant if the following word begins with one [...
13
votes
1answer
1k views

Prepositions/adpositions with genitive?

In Latin, there are prepositions that may be followed by a noun in accusative (like ad), ablative (cum) or both (in). I once thought ope was a preposition to be used with genitive, which I found ...
12
votes
1answer
239 views

Can you place "et" inside a prepositional phrase?

I became curious about this question as I was translating a passage written by a textbook author. The passage begins, Poeta Ovidius fabulam de dea Latona et de femina Niobe narrat. (Latin via Ovid)...
11
votes
1answer
158 views

What underlying semantic notions explain the meaning of 'against' for the preposition 'in'?

[Wiktionary :] 1. (governs the ablative) in, at, on (space)  [quotations ▼] 2. (governs the dative) within (time) 3. (governs the accusative) into, to  [quotations ▼] 4. (governs the ...
8
votes
1answer
98 views

Can conjunctions be used to join prepositions with the same object?

It is a characteristic of a certain kind of academic writing (or amateurish misconceptions thereof) to join prepositions by conjunctions with only one object. Some examples: The realization of the ...
16
votes
3answers
642 views

Would it be good Classical Latin style to always use the preposition "ab" and never "ā"?

I understand from Lingua Latina per se Illustrata (chap. 6) that the prepositions ā and ab are equivalent, except that ā is used only before words beginning with consonants, while ab can be used ...
16
votes
2answers
293 views

Is there a difference between 'a' and 'de' when the meaning is 'from'?

The Latin preposition de takes an ablative object and has several different translations including 'about', 'of', 'down from' and 'from'. The preposition a/ab also has multiple meanings including '...
10
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2answers
4k views

E pluribus unum or Ex pluribus unum?

I've seen the phrase in both wordings E pluribus unum and Ex pluribus unum. Which one is correct? See my follow-up question for the double meaning of this phrase.
5
votes
1answer
240 views

When to omit a preposition?

Consider 2 Kings, 16:1 in the Vulgate (2 Samuel in modern bibles): Cumque David transisset paululum montis verticem, apparuit Siba puer Miphiboseth in occursum ejus, cum duobus asinis, qui onerati ...
19
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1answer
2k views

Are the two cums related?

In short, is there a relation between the preposition cum and the conjunction cum? It makes some sense that the conjunction would come from the preposition. One could interpret some cum clauses so ...
11
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2answers
11k views

Difference between super and supra?

Is there a difference in meaning between super and supra (both with accusative)? Would one indicate motion and the other one position?
8
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2answers
1k views

When should the preposition *cum* be added as a suffix?

I was reading Plautus and came across quacum, which set in motion a few observations: Most beginning Latinists are familiar with the following constructions with first- and second- person and ...
6
votes
2answers
199 views

Best translation for 'at sea'

What is the best way of translating 'at sea'? For example, "The sailors fought bravely at sea". The translation 'in mari' seems the closest to me, as opposed to the literal 'ad mare' and treatment ...