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Questions tagged [prefix]

Use this tag for questions about prefixes.

3
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2answers
498 views

How can you tell whether prefixed ‘in-’ is the preposition ‘in’ or Indo-European ‘in-’?

Background The verb īnsum has the prefix in-. Prefixing in/in- to words, changes their meaning to ‘in’, ‘on’ et sim., or ‘un-’, ‘non’ et sim. (ɔ:¹ negation).² However, according to Wiktionary, the ...
7
votes
1answer
81 views

What is the meaning and origin of the “se-” prefix?

There are a lot of Latin words that begin with se-. It adds the notion of being "apart" or "separated": secerno secludo secubo seduco seiungo sepono etc. The linked entry calls it an "inseparable ...
2
votes
2answers
40 views

Can 'ex' in 'excurare' signify 'out'?

Etymonline states 'ex-' to signify 'out' Scour: "cleanse by hard rubbing," c. 1200, from Middle Dutch scuren, schuren "to polish, to clean," and from Old French escurer, both from Late Latin ...
8
votes
1answer
107 views

Prae- & Ante- (before)

The prefixes prae- and ante- both have the same meaning of 'before' in place or time. Why is the existence of both words necessary?
4
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0answers
62 views

How did the figurative meaning of 'iniungere' develop from the literal one?

The verb iniungere (a compound of in- and iungere) literally means "to join, fasten, attach". However, an Etymonline entry also gives it a figurative meaning "to inflict, to attack, impose". How was ...
4
votes
1answer
50 views

What's the logic of sub- in words like suppleo and sufficio?

The words suppleo and sufficio both derive from the prefix sub- ("under"), in which the 'b' of sub- is assimilated into the following consonant. Both these words carry the connotation of "being enough"...
8
votes
2answers
324 views

What is the correct Latin prefix for 'two-and-a-half-times'?

Question. What is the latin prefix for "2½ times" ? Remark. The question asks for the correct analogue of the prefix "sesqui-" which, of course, is the prefix for "1½ times".
9
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2answers
1k views

Is the prefix “di-” more Latin-like than “bi-”?

Question. (1) Is there anything close to scientifically-meaningful to say about whether the prefix "di-" is more Latin than the prefix "bi-", when indicating two-ness? (2) Are there published ...
9
votes
2answers
431 views

Is “anti” used in Latin?

Apparently, anti is a word already available in Greek, meaning against. However, it seems this word did not reach Latin. Still, Wikipedia entries of common English words that have anti as prefix are ...
8
votes
1answer
190 views

Why does 'a' change to 'i' in verbs derived from 'habere'?

The verbs derived from habere usually have an 'i' in the stem rather than an 'a'. For example, adhibere, exhibere, inhibere, and prohibere, leading to the modern English verbs adhibit, exhibit, ...
5
votes
0answers
58 views

Comparing per- and de- as intensifying prefixes

Both per- an de- can be used as intensifying prefixes. It seems that per- is far more common, but also de- occurs (detritus, defetisci, deplorare…). There is also deperire, where de- seems to ...
4
votes
3answers
113 views

Is there a prefix, suffix or adjective to indicate that something is the most numerous?

Is there any way (prefix, suffix, or adjective) to indicate that a noun is the most numerous in some aspect? For instance, if I want to tell everybody that my horse carries the largest number of ...
5
votes
2answers
239 views

Comparing utopia and atopia

For the purposes of this questtion, let me spell the English word "atopy" as "atopia". I have no idea why the the same kind of etymological background (same derivative on the same Greek word τόπος) ...
6
votes
1answer
248 views

Is “vicepraesidens” valid for “vice president”?

This phrase appeared in Nuntii Latini last December: In causa erant discordiae inter praesidentem et vicepraesidentem ortae. Is vice- a good prefix in Latin, and does it really produce the same ...
5
votes
1answer
73 views

Capitalization of adjectives with prefixes

When answering a recent question about the prefix per-, I gave an example of a national adjective (Finnus) with a prefix, to produce Perfinni. If I attach a prefix to an adjective that always starts ...
8
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2answers
302 views

Can “per-” be applied to any adjective?

A long while ago, I came across a few dictionary entries under per-, meaning "very." I saw peracer, perbonus, and some others. But, I'm not sure if per- can be used as a prefix for any adjective. Can ...
8
votes
1answer
334 views

Choosing between the prefixes e- and ex-

Before a consonant on can use either version of the prepositions e/ex. Both seem to appear in prefixes as well, but ex- is often assimilated. It seems that, for example, words beginning with F take ex-...
5
votes
1answer
51 views

Why was rēfringō prefixed with « re- »?

[ Etymonline : ]  [...]   refringere "to break up," from re- "back" (see re-) + comb. form of frangere "to break" (see fraction). [ Wiktionary : ] Etymology From re- +‎ frangō. I ...
10
votes
2answers
321 views

Prefix chaining in Latin verbs

In Greek, it is very common to chain more than one prepositional prefix at the beginning of a verb, e.g.: συν-εκ-βαίνω: "go out together" ἀντι-κατα-δύνω: "set over against" περι-εκ-χέομαι: "flow out ...
3
votes
2answers
90 views

Why was 'imperō' prefixed with 'in-' and not 'ad-'?

[ Wiktionary: ]   Etymology   From in- +‎ parō. (with dative) I command, give orders to I rule, govern I demand, impose Because the 3 definitions above matches the meaning that one ...
8
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3answers
441 views

Imperatives of derivatives of facere, dicere and ducere

Three verbs are well known to have an irregular short imperative: fac, dic, duc. Do the imperatives remain short in the presence of a prefix? For example, which ones are correct out of effic/effac/...
5
votes
1answer
39 views

Can I use in and advenire together?

Is it grammatical to combine in and advenire to say, for example, in Finniam advenit? This sounds otherwise fine to me, but I'm slightly worried about mixing the prepositions in and ad so I want to ...
7
votes
1answer
144 views

Word or morpheme for “middle” or “not above or below”, as opposed to “super” and “sub”?

What is a latin morpheme for “middle” which can be used as a prefix, instead of “sub“ and “super”? The context is the use of such a construct in English. So the following mentions some English ...
8
votes
1answer
263 views

Why is there an “o” in “controversus”?

Apparently, contrōversus comes from the preposition contrā- + versus. So why does it have "ō" instead of "ā"? I checked Lewis and Short, but it doesn't explain the development of this vowel. I also ...
16
votes
2answers
114 views

What is the difference in meaning or nuance between 'premō' and 'imprimō' in the sense of 'I press'?

Wiktionary shows that both premō and imprimō can mean (among other things) "I press." Looking at the formation of the latter word, the prefix im-, can negate the root word. How this applies to this ...