Questions tagged [praepositio]

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6
votes
2answers
593 views

How do I best translate “A big window into history”?

As I've only recently begun to study Latin, I'm not yet sure how to best translate "A big window into history". First of all, I'm not sure whether the adjective should precede, or rather ...
3
votes
1answer
59 views

The difference between “ante” and “antequam”

Not sure I can discern the crux of the difference between antequam and ante (According to L&S (II.B.1.a vs II.B.2), ante might be used with verbs, like antequam). In other words, in what occasions ...
2
votes
1answer
45 views

Preposition of agent

Is it better to say a lectica portatur or in lectica portatur if it's the lectīcā who is the agent? Gratias plurimas.
3
votes
1answer
138 views

Redundancy of “quo” with “de”

Passage: “Quo de genere mortis difficile dictu est.” Cic. Amic. 12 English translation (from Loeb): “It is hard to speak of the nature of his death.” French translation : “Quant à la nature de sa ...
7
votes
1answer
316 views

Semantic difference of ablative and accusative cases when following “in”

What is the semantic and conceptual difference of ablative and accusative cases when following in? Examples: In dubio pro reo & opinio iuris uniformis et in longo usu Dubio and longo are in ...
3
votes
0answers
116 views

Where does au-fugiō come from?

Hittite has a verbal prefix u- that indicates motion away from something. Kloekhorst connects it to Latin au-fugiō, "to flee from", saying they both come from PIE *h₂-u-. However, I'd always thought ...
8
votes
0answers
104 views

On different expressions of partitivity in Latin

I was wondering whether there is any difference between the following partitive expressions in Latin: ūnus tribūnōrum and ūnus ex tribūnīs 'one of the tribunes' (cf. the so-called 'partitive genitive' ...
2
votes
1answer
71 views

Declination of “potentia” with preposition “in”

In philosophy, e.g. in Spinoza, there is the Latin word "potentia" that is often translated as a power, or capacity, to act (potentia agendi) and to suffer actions. I am wondering what is the right ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

How did the preposition “de” evolve into meaning “from”?

I see that in reconstructed PIE "de" or "do" has a meaning of "towards" which is retained in Germanic "to" and Slavic "do". But in Latin "de" has a meaning of "from". Is that simply due it taking the ...
6
votes
1answer
136 views

Appropinquare: difference in the meaning according to the case?

Is there a difference in the meaning, between "appropinquare" + dative, and "appropinquare" + ad + accusative? Dictionaries are not very clear about it. https://outils.biblissima.fr/fr/collatinus-...
1
vote
0answers
49 views

Is it possible to use a prepositional phrase with a gerundive/gerund?

can we use prepositional phrases (like "de domo") linked to a gerund or a gerundive, can it act as an object?
3
votes
1answer
93 views

Coming from physically or originate from a place? (Ab Gallia venio)

With "Ab Gallia venio. or "De Gallia venio". (Or other sentences of the same kind) Could it mean both, I come from this place, or I am originated from this place (like a nationality, or the origin of ...
4
votes
2answers
98 views

Is “ante a priori” correct?

As I understand it, "a posteriori" means "from the latter," and "a priori" means "from the former." Suppose there was something predating the former in the context above. How would that be expressed ...
5
votes
2answers
194 views

“Venire ad” or “Venire in”?

When can I use "venire ad", or "venire in". (excepting the few locative cases) What kind of buildings, place, etc, can accept the one or the other? Is "venire ad" insists more on the move than "in"? ...
7
votes
1answer
763 views

In memoriam: why not “in memoria”?

Consider this usual example of Latin+English: As Wiktionary states, in memoriam literally means "into memory" (memoriam is in accusative case). However, as Wiktionary (above) and Wikipedia state, the ...
4
votes
2answers
670 views

Why is it to say 'paucis post diebus'?

In my Oxford Latin Course 2 chapter 21 there is a sentence 'paucis post diebus ubi Orbilius pueros dimisit'. Why is it not 'paucos post dies'? I remember that the preposition 'post' + accusative, ...
3
votes
2answers
94 views

nuance of difference in etymology of “intend” and “attend”

I am trying to tease out the etymological difference between "intend" and "attend." Both "in" or "en" as a Latin prefix and "ad" translate as "toward". So the etymological sense of both words is "to ...
5
votes
3answers
235 views

Why is “mecum” backwards?

Cum is a common preposition meaning "with" (as in "accompanying", not "using"). For example, if Caesar returned to Rome with his soldiers, that would be cum militibus suis. As a preposition, it comes ...
5
votes
1answer
64 views

“Oro Dominum” vel “Oro ad Dominum”?

Considerate Vulgatam. Exempli gratia, hi versiculi utuntur "ad" prepositione: Numeri 11:2: Cumque clamasset populus ad Moysen, oravit Moyses ad Dominum, et absorptus est ignis 4 Regnum 4:33 ...
4
votes
1answer
145 views

How do postpositions fit into Latin syntax?

In a comment on this answer, luchonacho comments that tenus is a preposition taking the genitive; this seemed odd to me, since I'd never considered tenus anything akin to a preposition. Tenus seems ...
5
votes
1answer
180 views

When to omit a preposition?

Consider 2 Kings, 16:1 in the Vulgate (2 Samuel in modern bibles): Cumque David transisset paululum montis verticem, apparuit Siba puer Miphiboseth in occursum ejus, cum duobus asinis, qui onerati ...
6
votes
2answers
143 views

Why would the prae­po­si­tion “per” ᴇᴠᴇʀ take an ab­la­tive in­stead of an ac­cu­sa­tive com­ple­ment?

ᴘᴇʀ + ᴀʙʟ.: Bar­bar­ism, solœ­­cism, or di­a­chron­ic evo­lu­tion? Lewis and Short clear­ly state that per is a prae­po­si­tion whose nor­mal com­ple­ment is in the ac­cusative. With­out hav­ing dol­...
2
votes
1answer
151 views

Can cases be replaced with prepositions + nominative?

Consider the word domus. Standard cases are domi, domo, domum, domo, domis. I wonder whether we could replace the above (and perhaps every single noun), with the "equivalent" preposition + nominative....
3
votes
1answer
183 views

How do extra and ultra compare?

The adverbs (and prepositions) extra and ultra are somewhat similar but not identical. While I can read the two dictionary entries and get an idea what they mean, I don't feel that I fully grasp how ...
4
votes
1answer
245 views

I'm really having trouble with “but” (as in “except”) in this phrase

I'm trying to say "No one but [i.e. except] love provokes me with impunity." where love is a metonymic stand-in for the person I love. I hope it makes sense. (You can read it as a personification if ...
3
votes
1answer
66 views

How is time period expressed in Latin?

How is time period expressed in Latin, e.g. "from Jan 1 to Mar 31"? I notice there are two prepositions meaning "from", "ab" and "ex". What's their difference? Which should I use for time period?
5
votes
1answer
93 views

Ne … quidem with preposition

What would be the translation of: He does not play even with his brother? Could it be: Ne cum fratre suo quidem ludit? Normally I have seen the structure ne ... quidem with a noun in the nominative ...
3
votes
1answer
130 views

Is the phrase 'Nec mea dona tibi studio disperta fideli' incorrect?

What is the difference between Ne mea dona tibi studio disperta fideli and Nec mea dona tibi studio disperta fideli and is the latter version, which differs in the single letter 'c' only, ...
3
votes
1answer
82 views

How do you show something from a window?

Suppose, for example, that a child is watching his dad come home from work. She can't wait any longer to show what she's got, so she goes to the window and shows her new teddy bear to her dad. How can ...
6
votes
2answers
192 views

Using pro and ab in place of ante and post?

I wanted to change windows to use the unabbreviated ante meridiem and post meridiem for A.M. and P.M., but they're one letter too long. Google Translate lists pro and ab as alternate translations for "...
11
votes
2answers
3k views

E pluribus unum or Ex pluribus unum?

I've seen the phrase in both wordings E pluribus unum and Ex pluribus unum. Which one is correct? See my follow-up question for the double meaning of this phrase.
6
votes
2answers
117 views

Praeparatio in + ablative or accusative?

I would like to know which case follows after the phrase "praeparatio in" in the sense of "preparation in (expectation of)" in English, for example. To use the above-mentioned example, would the ...
6
votes
2answers
177 views

Best translation for 'at sea'

What is the best way of translating 'at sea'? For example, "The sailors fought bravely at sea". The translation 'in mari' seems the closest to me, as opposed to the literal 'ad mare' and treatment ...
6
votes
1answer
120 views

Can a noun have more than one preposition? [duplicate]

While doing some independent translating, I came upon a sentence structure which I am having difficulty putting into Latin. The structure is as follows: into and out of the X of Y or, more ...
8
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between Ob and Propter?

I am new to learning Latin, and I read on some random Latin site that "ob" means "on account of" or "because of". But, I thought that "propter" meant "on account of". Is there a difference in ...
10
votes
2answers
406 views

Prefix chaining in Latin verbs

In Greek, it is very common to chain more than one prepositional prefix at the beginning of a verb, e.g.: συν-εκ-βαίνω: "go out together" ἀντι-κατα-δύνω: "set over against" περι-εκ-χέομαι: "flow out ...
22
votes
1answer
3k views

Why “ex nihilo” instead of “e nihilo”?

I was helping a friend earlier with an English-to-Latin translation and we started talking about the prepositions "a(b)" and "e(x)", which lose their consonant if the following word begins with one [...
8
votes
1answer
91 views

Can conjunctions be used to join prepositions with the same object?

It is a characteristic of a certain kind of academic writing (or amateurish misconceptions thereof) to join prepositions by conjunctions with only one object. Some examples: The realization of the ...
5
votes
1answer
49 views

Concerning the Verbal “From”

I am attempting to translate a text from english to latin, and am unsure how to translate the word from when it is used in the context of a verb. An example would be: "I took from him..."; another ...
8
votes
1answer
121 views

Is 'extra' an adverb or preposition here?

At hæc causa (per notam II et III) non potest in ipsa natura humana contineri quandoquidem vera hominis definitio numerum vicenarium non involvit adeoque (per notam IV) causa cur hi viginti homines ...
11
votes
1answer
219 views

Can you place “et” inside a prepositional phrase?

I became curious about this question as I was translating a passage written by a textbook author. The passage begins, Poeta Ovidius fabulam de dea Latona et de femina Niobe narrat. (Latin via Ovid)...
6
votes
1answer
3k views

Libera te tutemet ex inferis vs. Libera temet [ipsum] ab inferis?

In a movie (Event Horizon, spoilers ahead), you have this Latin phrase they think they heard and what it ends up being : Liberate me... Libera te tutemet (ex inferis). There's always the ...
11
votes
2answers
8k views

Difference between super and supra?

Is there a difference in meaning between super and supra (both with accusative)? Would one indicate motion and the other one position?
7
votes
1answer
279 views

“With respect to” in mathematics

The expression "with respect to" is common in mathematics. Consider these example sentences: The derivative of x^2y with respect to y is x^2. Let us reflect the point A with respect to the line L and ...
15
votes
2answers
187 views

Is there a difference between 'a' and 'de' when the meaning is 'from'?

The Latin preposition de takes an ablative object and has several different translations including 'about', 'of', 'down from' and 'from'. The preposition a/ab also has multiple meanings including '...
6
votes
1answer
136 views

Are pro and prae etymologically related?

Pro and prae are somewhat similar in meaning and form. De Vaan isn't clear about whether they are related; he mentions Proto-Indo-European roots *proH or *pro, and *pre-h2i, respectively. Could it be ...
8
votes
1answer
283 views

“Argumentum ad” vs. “argumentum a”

Is there a difference in meaning between argumentum ad and argumentum a? Does the latter even have authoritative usage in Latin?* Here are some samples that I've found, not always from authoritative ...
6
votes
1answer
360 views

Why did Cicero switch from “abs te” to “a te” in his later works?

Lewis and Short, in their entry on ab, describe a shift in use of abs in Cicero's works that had far-reaching ramifications: The use of abs was confined almost exclusively to the combination abs te ...
20
votes
1answer
2k views

Are the two cums related?

In short, is there a relation between the preposition cum and the conjunction cum? It makes some sense that the conjunction would come from the preposition. One could interpret some cum clauses so ...
8
votes
2answers
647 views

When should the preposition *cum* be added as a suffix?

I was reading Plautus and came across quacum, which set in motion a few observations: Most beginning Latinists are familiar with the following constructions with first- and second- person and ...