Questions tagged [philosophy-terms]

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What is the difference between an adjective ending in -alis and a genitive (in particular in Philosophia Naturalis/Naturae)?

In Latin literature, one can encounter both the expressions Philosophia Naturalis (e.g. by Isaac Newton) and Philosophia Naturae (e.g. by Johannes Sperlette) to refer to physics. The literal ...
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6 votes
2 answers
157 views

What does causa procurans mean?

What is the definition of the expression causa procurans, and who may have been the originator of the term? I found this expression used by a number of people, but I haven't been able to find it ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Variation on Descartes' famous phrase

I would like to put a twist on Descartes' famous phrase, "Cogito, ergo sum". Effectively I want to say, "I am... I think?", raising the question of whether the existence we perceive with our senses ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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How to translate "by means of utterance"?

If I in a philosophy paper wish to say that a statement renders itself meaningless/contradictory "in utterance" or "by means of utterance" (i.e. upon being uttered), is there a way to do this? ...
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1 answer
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Opposite for desideratum to mean "something not wished for"

Desideratum means "something that is desired", and quite often is used in philosophy to refer to the subject of a philosophical investigation. (Wiktionary, Merriam-Webster) I want another ...
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What is the "apparatus fontium"?

I have encountered with apparatus fontium for example in this reference: Gundissalinus, De divisione philosophiae, apparatus fontium ad pp. 36 –7 What is it and what is it's the literal meaning?
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5 votes
2 answers
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Meaning of "naturam unibilitatis"

In Summa theologiae (ST I q. 29 a. 1 ad 5) one can read: Ad quintum dicendum quod anima est pars humanae speciei, et ideo, licet sit separata, quia tamen retinet naturam unibilitatis, non potest ...
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5 votes
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Why did the Romans link Autumn with earth and melancholy, Spring with air and sanguine, and Winter with water and phelgm?

I don't understand the Romans' linking of humor, season, and characteristics for Humours 1-3. E.g. for 1: 1.1. Why'd black bile predominate in autumn (which I agree, is cold and dry)? 1.2. Why'd ...
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4 votes
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Philosophically sound English translation of Duns Scotus's "sed forma non cognoscitur nisi ex operationibus"?

In Libri 1, Quaestio XX, sec. 26, of Duns Scotus's In Octo Libros Physicorum Aristotelis, Duns Scotus gives expression to a common tenet of a doctrine of the Forms when he writes [S]ed forma non ...
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What is the word for "reason" and what resonance does it have in Roman culture?

I find it interesting that the French expression avoir raison shares an etymology with the English words "reason" and "rational". In a post-truth political era, it is refreshing that the French ...
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6 votes
1 answer
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What is the difference between sum and existo?

What is the difference between "sum" and "existo" verbs? Would "Cogito, ergo sum" be equivalent to "Cogito, ergo existō"?
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How to say "Double negation affirms by accident"?

I want to know how to say, "Double negation affirms by accident" or "Double negation affirms accidentally." Would it be duplex negatio affirmat per accidens? This is in reference to the idea from ...
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8 votes
1 answer
4k views

What is "philosophy" in Latin?

The Latin word I would use for to translate "philosophy" is philosophia. But this is a transliteration of a Greek word. Is there an originally Latin word for "philosophy"? The closest word I could ...
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5 votes
1 answer
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How to say, "Many are not one?" Pluribus non paribus unum?

How to say, "Many are not one?" Is it: pluribus non paribus unum?
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2 answers
278 views

How do you translate “the principle of explosion” into Latin?

How to say "the principle of explosion"? Would it be principium crepitum? The principle of explosion usually is understood to mean ex contradictione sequitur quodlibet, yet I'm very curious as to how ...
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1 answer
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Caeteris paribus

Caeteris paribus means "all else being equal" yet, terminologically, also stands in for "all else unchanged". I'm interested in knowing actually how to say "all else unchanged" in a way that bears ...
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4 votes
2 answers
844 views

Ergo, ex nihilo aliquid et ex nihilo nihil fit

I want to say, "Ergo, something comes from nothing and nothing comes from nothing." Is it correct to translate this as: "Ergo, ex nihilo aliquid et ex nihilo nihil fit"? I'm aware that "ex nihilo ...
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1 vote
1 answer
81 views

What semantic notions underlie the prefixes 'con-' and 'de-' (+ notare) with the logical concepts of 'con/de-notation'?

Source: Hurley, Patrick J. A Concise Introduction to Logic (2014 12 ed, but ∃ 2017 13 ed). p. 92 Middle.   The previous section of this chapter explored the cognitive meaning of language in ...
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2 votes
1 answer
223 views

What semantic notions underlie ex/in-tēnsiō with the logical meanings of ex/in-tension?

How did 'ex/in-tēnsiō' semantically specialize to mean the logical meanings below? 'ex/in-tēnsiō' obviously share the same root, and differ merely in prefixes. Does the difference in prefix explain ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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Eleatic arguments (argumenta Eleatica)?

I want to know how to say "Eleatic arguments" as well as how to say "Eleatistic arguments". Right now, all I can come up with for the former is "argumenta Eleatica", and I have no clue about the ...
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7 votes
1 answer
640 views

Modus Barbara, Modus Celarent, et Modus Darii: (Modi Barbara, Celarent, et Darii)?

Modus Barbara, Modus Celarent, and Modus Darii are names of valid syllogisms in the medieval taxonomy of valid syllogisms. I'm wondering how to say: "Moduses Barbara, Celarent, and Darii." As far as I'...
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1 vote
1 answer
189 views

Is it correct to say, "Additionem in prima, secunda, et tertia syllogismi"?

Is it correct to say, "Additionem in prima, secunda, et tertia syllogismi"? I'm trying my very best to say, "The addition of the first, second, and third syllogisms."
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7 votes
1 answer
299 views

'Conclusio sequitur ex premissis' or 'sequitur conclusio ex premissis'?

I'd like to know how best to translate "the conclusion follows from the premises". 'Conclusio sequitur ex premissis', 'sequitur conclusio ex premissis', or something else entirely?
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8 votes
1 answer
76 views

Recommendations for "easy" philosophical/political Latin?

My Latin is okay reading Cæsar and Livy, and I'm even (mostly) fine reading Cicero's vicious attacks on the enemies of whoever happened to hire him for the occasion. But when I come to philosophy and ...
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18 votes
2 answers
621 views

Nonne "a fortiori, a priori, a posteriori" solecismi sunt?

Are the terms a fortiori, a priori, and a posteriori bad Latin? If so, how and when did they become established? I understand that the dative case never takes a preposition in Latin—a most welcome ...
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