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Questions tagged [participle]

For questions about participles, such as "amans", "amatus" and "amaturus" from the verb "amare".

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"Renegatus": an active perfect participle from a non-deponent verb?

Several dictionaries' etymologies of English "renegade" trace it to Medieval Latin renegatus, an apostate, one who has denied his religion and gone back to another. Renegatus in turn is the ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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4 votes
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What combinations of tenses appear in periphrasis?

Periphrastic verb forms, specifically a participle plus an auxiliary verb, are very common in English ("I am writing now"). They also appear in Latin and Ancient Greek and a number of Romance ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes
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Which one is better: "sunt aequivalentes" or "aequivalent"?

If I want to say that two things are equivalent in Latin, I can imagine two ways using essentially the same word: X et Y sunt aequivalentes. X et Y aequivalent. Googling for the first option (...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes
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On the syntactic distribution of ablative gerund and nominative present participle

I've always taken it for granted that in Classical Latin nominative present participles cannot be replaced by ablative gerunds without a meaning change. For example, in the following case the ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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2 votes
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Is an Ablative Absolute construction like "portā clausā" ambiguous in Early Latin?

As a follow-up question of two previous posts (cf. here and here), I was wondering if an Ablative Absolute construction like portā clausā is ambiguous in Early Latin as it is in Classical Latin. For ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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2 votes
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34 views

More verbs like "mensuro", active verb derived from deponent?

I just read on Wiktionary that the Late/Vulgar verb mensuro (I measure) comes from Classical mensura (a measure or measurement), which comes from mensus, the perfect participle of the deponent verb ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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1 vote
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Anticausative/Mediopassive constructions in perfect form?

I was wondering what is the correct analysis/interpretation of exstincta sunt in the following text from Cicero: quarum rerum recordatio et memoria si una cum illo occidisset, desiderium ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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