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Questions tagged [ovidius]

Questions relating to the works of Ovid or Publius Ovidius Naso (43 BC – AD 17/18).

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What do "hic" and "ille" refer to in this passage from Ovid's Tristia?

In Ovid's Tristia, 1.2.23–4: ...Nihil est, nisi pontus et aer, Nubibus hic tumidus, fluctibus ille minax... As far as I can tell, this means ...There is nothing, unless the sea and air ...
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10 votes
1 answer
730 views

What's the deal with Ov. Met. V, 414

I'm writing this Latin verse parser/scanner, and all is fine and dandy until I load up Ov. Met. V. This book features the following verse in my source text, which is usually very good: adgnovitque ...
blagae's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
530 views

Is there something special about "corpus"?

Metamorphoses Book V, the story of Proserpina. At this point Ceres has just thrown some soup in an impertinent man's face and turned him into a lizard (as you do). mirantem flentemque et tangere ...
mike rodent's user avatar
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10 votes
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268 views

How to understand 'quae prosum sola nocendo'?

There is a line in Ovid's Metamorphoses II 519, which I don't understand at all (Juno's complaint) 'quaeritis, aetheriis quare regina deorum sedibus huc adsim? pro me tenet altera caelum! ...
Aili J.'s user avatar
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9 votes
2 answers
537 views

How to translate these few lines? Met. 1.94–96

I came across a passage that is quite difficult to understand. Unlike most passages that I ask about, it is hard for me to make an attempt. nondum caesa suis, peregrinum ut viseret orbem, ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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9 votes
1 answer
324 views

A question on line XV.167 of Ovid's Metamorphoses re 'eque'

My question concerns the use of the word 'eque'. As far as I can see it is the vocative of 'equus' but that clearly doesn't make sense and I can find no other meaning of the word in the dictionary. ...
bobsmith76's user avatar
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What does the phrase "nec non" mean? (Metamorphoses I.612-614)

In this passage from the Metamorphoses, Juno just descended from heaven onto earth to spy the whereabouts of her husband. Jupiter, having foreseen his wife's arrival, changes Io into a heifer. ...
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9 votes
3 answers
315 views

Did Ovid know of Mt. Ararat?

Here is a passage from Ovid's description of the flood in Metamorphoses 1, 293–4: occupat hic collem, cumba sedet alter adunca et ducit remos illic ubi nuper ararat. "This man occupies a ...
TKR's user avatar
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8 votes
4 answers
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Pyramus et Thisbe: did their parents forbid what they could not? Ovid, Metamorphoses IV.61

The Latin Library has the following punctuation for lines 60–62 of book IV of Ovid's Metamorphoses, describing how Pyramus and Thisbe fell in love but were forbidden from marrying by their parents: ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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How do I scan the hexameter "faunique satyrique et monticolae silvani"? (From Metamorphoses I, 193)

I was wondering if anyone knows how to scan this hexameter (complete source here https://la.wikisource.org/wiki/Metamorphoses_(Ovidius)/Liber_I). Something that is usually short definitely needs to be ...
dangao's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
323 views

Canonical version of Metamorphoses

I am trying to verify a statement about Ovid's Metamorphoses made in the Wikipedia page on the subject. The claim is that it contains 11,995 verses. The following questions arise: Can I define the ...
David's user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
991 views

What's the best translation of "vindice" in Met. 1.89?

I was translating this verse, and although I came up with several candidates for translating vindice, I am still not sure about the intended meaning. Aurea prima sata est aetas, quae vindice nullo, ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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8 votes
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"Aurea prima sata est aetas" - is there ambiguity here?

I'm (re)teaching myself Latin (I studied at school decades ago), and I've just picked up a book of excerpts from Ovid. Aurea prima sata est aetas, quae vindice nullo, sponte sua, sine lege fidem ...
mike rodent's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
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"Nam vos mutastis et illas" (Ovid)

This is a phrase from the opening lines of the Metamorphoses. (1.1–4) I am curious about a couple of things when it comes to this phrase. First, mutastis is an alternative form of the second-person ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
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Ovid: "nimis ex vero nunc tibi nomen erit"

In Ovid Amores 3.9, the elegy for Tibullus, we read: flebilis indignos, Elegeiia, solve capillos! a! nimis ex vero nunc tibi nomen erit My literal translation: "Tearful, loosen your undeserving ...
TKR's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
179 views

Translating Ovid's Fasti 1.149–150

dic, age, frigoribus quare novus incipit annus,     qui melius per ver incipiendus erat? Well then, say why the new year begins in the cold, though it should have been begun during the spring. Is ...
user21669's user avatar
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1 answer
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Unusual grammar in Ars Amatoria 1.509 f: 'a nulla tempora comptus acu'

I'm reading the Ars Amatoria in Hans Ørberg's annotated edition, this is book 1.509 f: Forma viros neglecta decet. Minoida Theseus abstulit, a nulla tempora comptus acu; I get the sense: "It ...
consistebat's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
282 views

Check this translation of Amores 1.3.26

I'm getting a custom wedding band made and I'd like to have a line of Ovid inscribed along the outside of the band. Specifically: iunctaque semper erunt nomina nostra tuis. If my Latin isn't ...
Some_Guy's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
412 views

Corrupted Line in Daphne and Apollo

Why is Line 546 of Ovid's Daphne and Apollo considered a "corrupted line"? Here's the section in which it is contained: 543 viribus absumptis expalluit illa citaeque 544 victa labore fugae ...
Sapphira's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
487 views

How to scan "nempe tenens, quod amo, gremioque in Iasonis haerens"

Ovid's Metamorphoses 7.66, here I marked my attempt: nempĕ tĕ/nens, quŏd ă/mo, grĕmĭ/oqu(e) in/ Iasŏnĭ/s haerens That makes the 3 first feet dactyls and the fourth one a spondee, but the ...
d_e's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
360 views

Is a relative pronoun commonly used as a third person pronoun? (Metamorphoses I.583-587)

In this short passage by Ovid, the pronoun "quam" seems to be used as a third person pronoun. Inachus unus abest imoque reconditus antro fletibus auget aquas natamque miserrimus Io luget ut ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
149 views

How to make sense of this standalone infinitive? (Metamorphoses 1.601—603)

For starters, I haven't finished translating this short passage yet, so I would be grateful if you refrain from giving the full translation. (And if it's hard to answer the question without doing so, ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
272 views

Feedback on my Latin note an a passage from Ovid’s Metamorphoses

In Metamorphoses 10.728-731, just before Venus causes a flower to spring from Adonis’ blood, Ovid hints at, but doesn’t describe in detail, another metamorphosis: Mint sprouting from the crushed limbs ...
Patricius's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
2k views

Agreement in "medio tutissimus ibis"

Ovid's Metamorphoses, Book II, line 137 gives us the aphorism (in) medio tutissimus ibis The English translation for this is typically given as "In the middle, you will go most safe." How does "...
chwarr's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
159 views

'Subiecit' meaning in Ovid Metamorphoses III 167?

Here is a line in Ovid which I find confusing: quo postquam subiit, nympharum tradidit uni armigerae iaculum pharetramque arcusque retentos, altera depositae subiecit bracchia pallae, vincla ...
Aili J.'s user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
144 views

Peneus River (Metamorphoses 1.567–572)

I just worked on translating a passage that was very difficult for me, and not without a lot of help from online resources. Here is the passage below: Est nemus Haemoniae, praerupta quod undique ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
145 views

A representative work of Ovid

I am considering reading some Ovid(ius), possibly with some colleagues. I don't want too much due to time limitations; perhaps something on the order of a single book of Metamorphoses should be ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
1k views

Why is "formas" used for bodies and "corpora" for forms? (Metamorphoses 1.1.1)

The first clause of the Metamorphoses goes, In nova fert animus mutatas dicere formas / corpora; My mind inclines me to speak of bodies changed into new forms. As an English speaker, this seems ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
115 views

Does 'concrescere' take dative?

I wonder is 'rigido rostro' here in dative or ablative? Under "Dative and verbs compounded with prepositions" (Gildersleeve & Lodge) it is said, that " Many verbs compounded with the prepositions ...
Aili J.'s user avatar
  • 1,169
5 votes
1 answer
64 views

Why does ‘lūdīs’ end in a short syllable in Ov. Ep. Sapph. 16?

In Ovid’s Epistulae 16.152–153, the following two lines are found (‘eligiac couplet’, I believe is the term in English): mṓre tuǽ gentī́s nitidā́ dum nū́da palǽstrā̆    lū́dis et és ...
Canned Man's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
331 views

How is this perfect passive participle being used?

From Metamorphoses book II: nec minus Heliades fletus et, inania mortimunera, dant lacrimas, et caesae pectora palmisnon auditurum miseras Phaethonta querellas nocte dieque vocant adsternunturque ...
mike rodent's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
127 views

Where does strīx come from?

Ovid's Fastī for June 1 relates a story about strīgēs, witches who could transform into owls and magically sap the life of infants. There seem to be two forms of this word, strīx, -gis and strīga, -ae....
Draconis's user avatar
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How to translate this particular phrase? Is it ambiguous?

(From Ovid Apollo and Daphne, book 1 of Metamorphoses) ut canis in vacuo leporem cum Gallicus arvo vidit, et hic praedam pedibus petit, ille salutem; alter inhaesuro similis iam iamque tenere ...
mike rodent's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
705 views

Translation and context of 'faciam ut potero'

What is the most accurate translation to English of this expression FACIAM UT POTERO I think this appears in some Ovidius's poem and is a motto of an school of lawyers in Spain.
Jose Javier Garcia's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
1k views

An edition of the whole Metamorphoses for easy reading?

Is there an edition of Ovid's Metamorphoses in Latin that comes with auxiliary features to make it an easier read? I want to read it in Latin, but to make it more pleasurable, I would like support ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
353 views

What's this gerundive doing here?

Metamorphoses Book V, the story of Proserpina. At this point Proserpina's mother Ceres is still looking for her daughter. Sicaniam repetit, dumque omnia lustrat eundo,venit et ad Cyanen. ... "...
mike rodent's user avatar
  • 1,051
4 votes
1 answer
200 views

Principal caesura in unus erat toto line I.6 of Ovid's Metamorphoses

I am scanning Ovid's metamorphoses. For the line "unus erat toto naturae vultus in orbe," I have - - | - - | - - | - ' ' | - ' ' | - x. There doesn't seem to be an obvious position for the ...
Sura's user avatar
  • 41
4 votes
1 answer
210 views

How was the original Ovid Metamorphoses formatted/punctuated most likely?

What punctuation was used in Classical Latin? was very insightful, but it doesn't go into specifics. Wikipedia says we don't have any original sources of Ovid's Metamorphoses until the 9th or 10th ...
Lance's user avatar
  • 298
4 votes
1 answer
212 views

Dative of Personal Interest?

In this line in Ovid Metamorphoses Book III. 505, is fratri put in the Dative because ' of the person in whose honour, or interest, or advantage or for whose pleasure, an action takes place, or the ...
Aili J.'s user avatar
  • 1,169
3 votes
3 answers
582 views

How does the caesura work on this line?

sed leve pondus erat nec quod cognoscere possent Solis equi, solitaque iugum gravitate carebat (Ovid Metamorphoses book 2) At first I thought it might be like this, as my first explorations of Ovid ...
mike rodent's user avatar
  • 1,051
3 votes
1 answer
317 views

How would "Eurystheus" be scanned in Ovid's Metamorphoses?

I was doing some scansion exercises on hexameter.co and this line (Ovid's Metamorphoses IX: Line 274) was brought up: "solverat Eurystheus, odiumque in prole paternum" I scanned the first 4 ...
VivatLinguaLatina's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
186 views

Description of Eurus in Ovid's Metamorphoses

Here's a quote from Ovid's Metamorphoses 1.61-2, where he talks about Eurus, the east wind: Eurus ad Auroram Nabataeaque regna recessit Persidaque et radiis iuga subdita matutinis I've translated it ...
rmdmc89's user avatar
  • 599
3 votes
1 answer
104 views

Should "so that" be translated as "ita ut"?

Ovid’s Amores 3.10 is a somewhat challenging poem, so I felt compelled to write a brief synopsis of a possible timeline for the events it alludes to. Cum Cerēs Proserpinam fīliam intellēxisset ā ...
Patricius's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
71 views

Any scholarly views about how someone like Ovidius might have pronounced Greek words?

Μετᾰμορφώσεις In this word, as can be seen, there is a pitch accent on ω, and also it is generally accepted (per Allen, Vox Graeca) that φ was an aspirated P (pʰ), not a fricative (f). Are there any ...
mike rodent's user avatar
  • 1,051
2 votes
0 answers
75 views

Check my Latin: Note on Ovid’s use of the name Appias. (A fountain, a nymph, and a bunch of lawyers.)

Ovid uses the words Appias or Appiades on three occasions (Ars Amatoria 1.79-88 and 3.447-452; Remedia Amoris 659-660) to refer jokingly to the legal business conducted in the Forum of Julius Caesar. ...
Patricius's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
252 views

Ovid, Metamorphoses IV

Lines 154–157: "hoc tamen amborum verbis estote rogati, o multum miseri meus illusque parentes, ut, quos certus amor, quos hora novissima iunxit, conponi tumulo non invideatis eodem" ...
tony's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Problem with lines 8.21-8.22 of Ovids Amores 1.8

The sentence is: "illa monebat talia (mē duplicēs occuluēre forēs)" So the first part I'm pretty sure I've got correct. I have it as: "that distinguished witch (antecedant is Dipsas) ...
Chris's user avatar
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