Questions tagged [numerals]

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14
votes
4answers
3k views

What does this text mean with capitalized letters?

I saw this text carved at the foot of a statue in Klagenfurt, Austria: I guess it's in Latin and Google translate gave me a sketchy translation. But I don't get why some letters are capitalized? ...
6
votes
2answers
91 views

How were fractions written and pronounced?

In English, when we want to express parts of wholes and certain numbers of said parts, we use fractions consisting of a denominator indicating how many equal pieces an item has been broken or divided ...
4
votes
1answer
168 views

Pronunciation of numbers with respect to years

I understand that when dates are written, the years are expressed in Roman numerals (e.g.: 2019 is written MMXIX), but it has been years since I heard the numbers actually pronounced. How were the ...
4
votes
1answer
92 views

Why aren't cardinal numbers over three inflected?

I've been looking through some etymologies and it seems to me that cardinals past trēs aren't inflected. Is this correct, and if so, what's the logic in forming words with indeclinable numbers? Take, ...
1
vote
1answer
119 views

What would a Roman license plate number look like? [closed]

My state recently changed the formatting of our license plate numbers (from 123-ABC to ABC-1234) in an effort to increase the number of available plate numbers. This got me thinking as to what a Roman ...
3
votes
1answer
101 views

Numeral form for one pluralia tantum noun

One pants? One scissors? Oh, no way! This is a follow-up to the @brianpck's question How do I specify how many “litterae” or “castra” there are?, and the accepted answer was to use distributive ...
5
votes
1answer
79 views

The middle A of quadraginta

Consider these Latin cardinal numbers: quadrAginta, quinquAginta, sexAginta, nonAginta. The -ginta seems to stand for tens (cf. triginta, octoginta) and the initial parts quadr-, quinqu-, sex-, and ...
10
votes
1answer
522 views

Do Roman numerals stand for something?

This may be an incredibly obvious question, but if so it's not immediately clear to me and probably deserves a question here. Two Roman numerals seem to have an obvious parallel to an existing word: ...
2
votes
1answer
91 views

Is it VIIth or VIIe in latin?

What is the correct way to write roman numerals with superscript? Should the convention of the language be used or the latin convention?
5
votes
1answer
41 views

Adverb for approximate numbers

In classical Latin, what is the best adverb for describing approximate numbers? If several work well, are there any differences? I mean saying things like "I have about ten euros". I would translate ...
4
votes
1answer
90 views

A counting poem or song

There are some traditional songs that are very repetitive and involve counting up or down. The only English example I know is "99 bottles of beer", and I know two in Finnish: "the elephant march" (...
6
votes
2answers
207 views

How did mille get so weird?

The word mille is weird. In singular it is — or can be considered — an indeclinable adjective, and the main word is declined according to the grammatical role. In plural it is a declinable ...
26
votes
2answers
429 views

How to say “every fourth year” in Latin?

My intuition says that "every fourth year" would translate to Latin as "quarto quoque anno". I read the comic Asterix Olympius in Latin, and on page 11 the druid describes the Olympic games like this: ...
12
votes
2answers
195 views

“Dies unus”—non primus?

Genese 1:5 Hieronymus traduxit: Appellavitque lucem Diem, et tenebras Noctem: factumque est vespere et mane, dies unus. Cur "unus", non "primus"? Nonne numerum ordinalem significat? Nonne "unus" ...