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Questions tagged [numbers]

Questions relating to the use of numbers or numerals in Latin or Greek, both as words (unus, duo) and Roman numerals (I, II).

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Why does the declension of "duo" (two) look like the first/second declension in nominative, genitive and accusative, but like the third otherwise?

The declension of the number "duo" (two) looks like the first and the second declension in the nominative ("duo", "du-ae"), genitive ("du-arum", "du-orum&...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
36 views

Which verb number does zero take? [duplicate]

(Creating spreadsheets can lead you into unexpected directions.) As many are aware of, the number zero itself, is a fairly recent invention, but words for it of course do and did exist in Latin; ...
Canned Man's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
166 views

What does "Tris dies" mean in "Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles"?

From Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles: Tris dies per totam insulam matrem quaerebat; tandem quarto die ad templum Dianae pervenit. http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/ritchie.html What does "Tris dies"...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
376 views

Which word was used in formal speech instead of "bini" (pairs), if "bini" was impolite because of sounding like the Greek f-word?

I know that Ancient Romans avoided the word "bini" (pairs) because it sounded similar to the Ancient Greek f-word. But which word did they use instead? How would you say "four pairs&...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
73 views

Are monos and eis synonyms?

In Attic Greek, monos means only, alone, and eis means one. Are they synonyms? Can monos also mean one?
Tim's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
128 views

How to write Fourteen in Roman numerals? (Unicode)

Preferably after ⅻⅰ/13? So it goes in "alphabetical" order.
losaline's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
66 views

Adverbial numeral for the "teen"s

I noticed this numeral while reading Regulus, the Latin version of the Little Prince. In the scene that the businessman shows his sum of stars, he says: Cinq cent un millions six cent vingt-deux ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
586 views

Septīmus or septĭmus?

In the past, I'd vaguely assumed that the word for "seventh" was septīmus, because we see an i instead of an e in the Romance languages (Italian settimo, French septime, etc). However, Lewis ...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
207 views

What are the classical attestions of "duodeviginti" and "undeviginti"?

Calling eighteen and nineteen "two from twenty" and "one from twenty" has always felt like a bit of joke to me, especially since modern uses of Latin and all her daughter languages ...
No Name's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
79 views

Why don't "number" and "count" have the same root?

I noticed that in Turkish "number" (sayı) and "counting" (saymak) come from the same root (say-). In English and other European languages number comes from Latin "numerus"...
zeynel's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
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How would you say "I have been to Croatia numerous times." in Latin?

"I've been to Croatia once." would, if I am not mistaken, be "Fui in Croatia semel.". "I've been to Croatia two times." would be "Fui in Croatia bis.". "...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
369 views

What other numeral systems were used in Classical Rome?

In a recent question, I asked what the symbol was used for a thousand in Classical Latin, because I had heard somewhere that it was not 'M' which is what we are currently taught is the symbol (Short ...
Mitch's user avatar
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14 votes
1 answer
5k views

What was the symbol used for 'one thousand' in Ancient Rome?

I saw an episode of QI (Quite Interesting, a British 'quiz' show that just sort of presents trivia). I don't know the episode or when it was produced (I've searched for it on youtube but haven't found ...
Mitch's user avatar
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1 answer
178 views

Why are 18 and 19 expressed differently from 11 - 17?

Why are 18 and 19 expressed as something less than 20, while 11 - 17 are expressed as something more than 10? Why are only 18 and 19 chosen to be expressed that way? Are 8 and 9 expressed as ...
Tim's user avatar
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10 votes
4 answers
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What is the word for number "0"?

Unus, -a, -um means number "1". What is the word for number "0"? https://www.translate.com/english-latin says it is nulla. Is it correct?
Tim's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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What is going on with the symbol in the weight here?

So this is an image from William Musgrave's account of the Southbroom Hoard discovered outside Devizes, Wiltshire, in England in 1714. They seem to be some local's cache hidden away around the reign ...
lly's user avatar
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21 votes
2 answers
6k views

How to write 13 in Roman Numerals (Unicode)?

I know the answer seems trivial but believe me, it is not! In Unicode There are different characters for Roman numerals. For example, one is not i but ⅰ which is a different character; or a better ...
abbassix's user avatar
  • 311
6 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is there an adjective for "of eight years, eight years old"?

I was looking for "of eight years", and I saw "octoni, ae, a." Then I saw: Septuennis "of seven years, seven years old. (Puer Septuennis, a seven years old boy) Quinquennis: &...
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4 votes
2 answers
176 views

Is there a zeroth Greek number noun below trias, dyas, monas?

I gave a list number-based nouns borrowed from Greek as an answer to a question on using numbers as nouns: monas, dyas, trias, tetras, pentas, hexas, heptas, octas, enneas, decas… One can conceivably ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
250 views

How do you use a numeral as a genitive substantive?

In English, you can use a bare numeral as a substantive and refer to a group as something like "The Nine." You can then say something like, "The House of the Nine." How would you ...
Adam's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
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What numbers (e.g. 0, -1, or 1.0) are plurals in Latin?

The basic question is: With which numbers should I use a plural form of the noun? Background: English In English it seems to me that the only singular number is 1 (and maybe -1), but everything else ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is there a Latin word for 225th anniversary?

If bicentennial is the Latin word for the 200th anniversary, what word would one use for the 225th anniversary?
Michael Barnett's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
100 views

Conciseness of Roman Numerals

I noticed earlier that a roman numeral (8) is written as VIII. It appears that it is more concise (less characters) to write it as IIX (meaning 2 before 10 instead of 3 after 5). Could someone give me ...
Joe Kerr's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
155 views

Why does the tradition talk about four types of Latin numbers when there are more

In reviewing this question, a brief discussion arose in the comments about how many types of numbers Latin has. The suggestion was that the tradition states that there are four, and other types of ...
Vegawatcher's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
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Is neuter verb agreement of mīlia when paired with animate genitives a confirmed usage?

Having just reviewed this question, I find that I am surprised by the verb agreement in this sentence: Nam d[ecum] mīlia Americānōrum cōnāta sunt ad centiēs centēna mīlia dollāriōrum raedāriīs mittere ...
Vegawatcher's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
116 views

Help with (big) numbers including 'decena'

I wonder if you could help me with the text below. I get the gist of the message, but am struggling with decena. Nam decēna mīlia Americānōrum cōnāta sunt ad centiēs centēna mīlia dollāriōrum ...
grumio's user avatar
  • 383
7 votes
2 answers
112 views

How big is "duas partes decimarum"?

This record is from The Cartulary of Newnham Priory, transcribing a record from 1166. Simon [II] de Beauchamp granted whole churches and fractions of other tithes to Newnham priory. Here is how it was ...
emrys57's user avatar
  • 487
3 votes
0 answers
125 views

A question about etymology of the Etruscan word for number eight

An often cited etymology is that the Etruscan word 𐌂𐌄​​𐌆𐌐 (kezp, eight) is a compound word from 𐌂𐌉​ (ki, three) and 𐌆𐌄𐌐 (zep, hand), that it meant literally "three plus the number of ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
82 views

Names for digits or numbers

How would you say "I write zeroes and ones" or "I need a fiver" or "the number seven" in Latin? There are a couple of cases where in some languages one uses instead of a ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
106 views

Number of adjectives in polite plural address

This question concerns using the plural vos instead of the singular tu for polite address of a single person in Latin. This is not a classical feature but arises later. When using this address, are ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
462 views

Is unius an irregular genitive?

I notice that the genitive of unus can apparently be either the regular uni, or can also be unius. Is this form, unius, just a completely irregular oddity, or is there some logical precedent for it? ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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18 votes
2 answers
3k views

What does the "Roman" numeral Ɔ represent?

It's conceivable that the numeral Ɔ and letters it combines with are a mediaeval conceit rather than truly Roman — hopefully this is still on topic. I'm trying to decipher the publication date of a ...
Andrew Leach's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
334 views

Correct pronunciation of full Latin dates

What is the correct Latin pronunciation of modern full dates, where the word 'anno' is omitted e.g. 'die 24 Augusti 1954 nata'? In which case stands the numeral of the year? Is the word 'anno' ...
Ben A.'s user avatar
  • 153
11 votes
2 answers
2k views

Does Latin have any words for specific numbers apart from the numbers themselves (akin to the English "dozen", for example)

In English, many numbers have specific words that denote them, distinct from the number itself. For example "dozen" means group of 12; "gross" means 144; and "score" ...
codingatty's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
468 views

1 to at least 200 Latin list cardinal numbers

Aiming to answer this Stack Exchange puzzle, I am looking for a list of the n first numbers with n being a positive integer greater than 200. I already have a list of the first 100 numbers by ...
JKHA's user avatar
  • 151
14 votes
1 answer
5k views

Does it make sense to display a decimal number such as 12.34 as Roman numerals? If not, how else?

I'm auto-converting any "Arabic" number in a text to Roman numerals. This means that: 123 Becomes: CXXIII But what to do when I encounter decimals such as: 12.34 ? Should I really do: XII....
Jimmy Perez's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
162 views

Did "quartilis" exist?

In statistics, a point that separates out (a multiple of) 25% of the data set is called a "quartile". Similarly, if it separates out 20% of the data, it's a "quintile", 1% a "percentile", and in ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes
3 answers
4k views

Why is largest number in Roman Numerals not represented as "MMMIM"?

according to wikipedia, the largest number Roman Numeral system can represent is represented like following: (answer below has much bigger number represented) MMMCMXCIX why can't it be represented ...
Sajuuk's user avatar
  • 167
3 votes
2 answers
237 views

Two by four meters in size

If I want to describe the dimensions of my office, I might say that it is about two by four meters. How do I phrase this size, "two by four meters", in Latin? I don't just want to say that the area ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
796 views

How were fractions written and pronounced?

In English, when we want to express parts of wholes and certain numbers of said parts, we use fractions consisting of a denominator indicating how many equal pieces an item has been broken or divided ...
Media Matella Lucretia Flores's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
374 views

Why aren't cardinal numbers over three inflected?

I've been looking through some etymologies and it seems to me that cardinals past trēs aren't inflected. Is this correct, and if so, what's the logic in forming words with indeclinable numbers? Take, ...
user3353751's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
2k views

An error message in Latin for my programming language

I am writing a piece of software that translates programs into programs (a "compiler", in informatics lingo) and my source language allows the programmer to specify Latin numerals. In case the ...
Christian Rinderknecht's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
1k views

Why was ante tribus translated as "fifteen years ago"?

In an answer I posted here, I provided someone else's translation which translated ante tribus as "fifteen years ago". The translation provided in the question also translated tribus the same way: ...
Expedito Bipes's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
91 views

Understanding "decimam decimae"

I'm struggling to see the logic behind the expression "decimam decimae". In the Vulgata, we read (Numbers 29: 11-13): In calendis autem offeretis holocaustum Domino, vitulos de armento duos, ...
luchonacho's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
218 views

Ordinal adjectives for single things modifying plural noun?

To refer to "the first and second chapters", do I say: capitula prima et secunda or: capitula primum et secundum?
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
472 views

What would a Roman license plate number look like? [closed]

My state recently changed the formatting of our license plate numbers (from 123-ABC to ABC-1234) in an effort to increase the number of available plate numbers. This got me thinking as to what a Roman ...
Sam K's user avatar
  • 3,998
4 votes
1 answer
168 views

Quinquies and quinquiens

Consider the word quinquies/quinquiens ("five times"). It has two alternative spellings. Having the options -ies and -iens seems to be common for numerals of this kind. What is the origin of these ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
367 views

Comparing decem and -decim

The Latin cardinal numbers starting at ten are decem, undecim, duodecim… Does the -decim (roughly "-teen") come from decem or from the same root? (I faintly recall decem and δέκα coming from ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
222 views

What is a digit?

Is there a good Latin word for a digit or figure? I might want to say that the sum of the digits of 43 is 7 or that an actor was paid a six-figure salary for a movie. It occurred to me that I don't ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
152 views

Singulae aut unae scopae?

Tuomo Pekkanen's grammar (§92.1) explains how to express the number of something that is expressed by a plural-only word. Numbers greater than one are expressed with bini, trini etc. but a single one ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar