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Questions tagged [numbers]

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4
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1answer
84 views

Why aren't cardinal numbers over three inflected?

I've been looking through some etymologies and it seems to me that cardinals past trēs aren't inflected. Is this correct, and if so, what's the logic in forming words with indeclinable numbers? Take, ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

An error message in Latin for my programming language

I am writing a piece of software that translates programs into programs (a "compiler", in informatics lingo) and my source language allows the programmer to specify Latin numerals. In case the ...
8
votes
1answer
801 views

Why was ante tribus translated as “fifteen years ago”?

In an answer I posted here, I provided someone else's translation which translated ante tribus as "fifteen years ago". The translation provided in the question also translated tribus the same way: ...
4
votes
2answers
59 views

Understanding “decimam decimae”

I'm struggling to see the logic behind the expression "decimam decimae". In the Vulgata, we read (Numbers 29: 11-13): In calendis autem offeretis holocaustum Domino, vitulos de armento duos, ...
3
votes
1answer
138 views

Ordinal adjectives for single things modifying plural noun?

To refer to "the first and second chapters", do I say: capitula prima et secunda or: capitula primum et secundum?
1
vote
1answer
101 views

What would a Roman license plate number look like? [closed]

My state recently changed the formatting of our license plate numbers (from 123-ABC to ABC-1234) in an effort to increase the number of available plate numbers. This got me thinking as to what a Roman ...
4
votes
1answer
59 views

Quinquies and quinquiens

Consider the word quinquies/quinquiens ("five times"). It has two alternative spellings. Having the options -ies and -iens seems to be common for numerals of this kind. What is the origin of these ...
5
votes
2answers
110 views

Comparing decem and -decim

The Latin cardinal numbers starting at ten are decem, undecim, duodecim… Does the -decim (roughly "-teen") come from decem or from the same root? (I faintly recall decem and δέκα coming from ...
3
votes
1answer
73 views

What is a digit?

Is there a good Latin word for a digit or figure? I might want to say that the sum of the digits of 43 is 7 or that an actor was paid a six-figure salary for a movie. It occurred to me that I don't ...
6
votes
1answer
79 views

Singulae aut unae scopae?

Tuomo Pekkanen's grammar (§92.1) explains how to express the number of something that is expressed by a plural-only word. Numbers greater than one are expressed with bini, trini etc. but a single one ...
5
votes
1answer
71 views

The middle A of quadraginta

Consider these Latin cardinal numbers: quadrAginta, quinquAginta, sexAginta, nonAginta. The -ginta seems to stand for tens (cf. triginta, octoginta) and the initial parts quadr-, quinqu-, sex-, and ...
8
votes
2answers
585 views

What is the correct Latin prefix for 'two-and-a-half-times'?

Question. What is the latin prefix for "2½ times" ? Remark. The question asks for the correct analogue of the prefix "sesqui-" which, of course, is the prefix for "1½ times".
7
votes
1answer
71 views

Expressing a number of years with a single word

An answer to an earlier question about age of wine introduced me to adjectives for specific ages in years. Similarly, there are nouns for periods of time in years. For example: bimus & biennium ...
10
votes
1answer
367 views

Do Roman numerals stand for something?

This may be an incredibly obvious question, but if so it's not immediately clear to me and probably deserves a question here. Two Roman numerals seem to have an obvious parallel to an existing word: ...
5
votes
0answers
137 views

Can Roman numerals stand for any kind of Latin numbers?

Latin has four classes of number words. Can Roman numerals (I, II, …) be used to for any class, or should they be restricted to, say, cardinals and ordinals? For example, can I abbreviate any ...
11
votes
2answers
248 views

How do I specify how many “litterae” or “castra” there are?

Certain words in Latin have a special meaning in the plural, which is often translated with the English singular. One obvious example of this is litterae, -arum, which means, "a letter." Litteras, ...
6
votes
1answer
126 views

What are the decimal and grouping marks in modern Latin?

To write non-integer numbers in the decimal system (without fractions), one needs a decimal mark. In English one uses the decimal point, but in many other languages one uses a comma instead. Wikipedia ...
6
votes
1answer
39 views

Adverb for approximate numbers

In classical Latin, what is the best adverb for describing approximate numbers? If several work well, are there any differences? I mean saying things like "I have about ten euros". I would translate ...
4
votes
1answer
88 views

A counting poem or song

There are some traditional songs that are very repetitive and involve counting up or down. The only English example I know is "99 bottles of beer", and I know two in Finnish: "the elephant march" (...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

How did the Romans pronounce roman numerals?

As I understand it, their notation (subtractive notation?) is quite hard and tedious to work with even for its natives. In fact, many numbers are themselves math problems. How did they speak of their ...
7
votes
2answers
161 views

How did mille get so weird?

The word mille is weird. In singular it is — or can be considered — an indeclinable adjective, and the main word is declined according to the grammatical role. In plural it is a declinable ...
11
votes
2answers
2k views

Are “sex” and “sexus” etymologically related?

Are sex (the number 6) or sextus (⅙ or ordinal sixth)(From where the English word "sextant" comes.) and sexus (sex or gender) etymologically related?
16
votes
1answer
158 views

Which Roman Numerals were used to express extremely large numbers in Classical Latin?

According to Wikipedia, there are two notable ways to render large numbers, reaching up to hundreds of thousands and higher: apostrophus and vinculum. The first uses a system of expanding rings, so ...