Questions tagged [noun]

For questions about nouns.

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38 views

Are Κηφάς (a Greek proper name), κεϕαλή (head), and πέτρος (rock) etymologically related?

Saint Peter was named Cephas by Jesus, which is recorded in the gospels as the Greek translation Πέτρος. Are Κηφάς (a Greek proper name < Aramaic כיפא‎, kēp̄ā, "rock"), κεϕαλή (head), and ...
5
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1answer
150 views

Creating place names from Latin verbs?

Latin words like crematorium and vomitorium seem to be made from verb + -torium Is there a pattern to this I can follow for arbitrary verbs? Furor + -torium = furotorium Or Farcio + -torium = ...
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0answers
100 views

Are pignus, pinguedo, & piger etymologically related?

Are pignus (pledge), pinguedo (fat), and piger (lazy person) etymologically related? de Vaan p. 465 says: The etymology [of pignus] is uncertain, since one can imagine a meaning "pledge, surety&...
4
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1answer
488 views

Why is there no case agreement between "magni" and "poetae"?

Shouldn't "magni" be "magnae" as it is modifying "poetae"? Fīliae vestrae dē libris magnī poētae saepe cogitābant. The quote is from Wheelock's Latin, chapter 6.
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2answers
494 views

Is the dative plural of anima animis or animabus?

Some paradigms I have seen give the dative plural of anima as animis. However, other word lists claim that anima, filia, famula and dea are irregular and that the dative and ablative plural are ...
4
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1answer
62 views

How do you translate "herbarium of peril" into Latin?

Is "herbaria pericula" an accurate translation? What is the grammatically correct way to express "peril herbaria/herbarium of peril"? Compound words This question is for a name of ...
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3answers
705 views

Is it grammatically correct to attributively use nominative forms of nouns in New Latin?

There are some muscle names in New Latin that seem to be nouns as far as I can tell, such as flexor and extensor. However, according to several Wikipedia articles for these muscles, they behave as if ...
4
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0answers
59 views

Second declension feminine plants

Is there any reason why some well-known plant names, especially tree names, are feminine, but 2nd declension? (now interested in classical, not scientific ones) E.g.: trees aesculus alnus balanus ...
4
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47 views

Were Etruscan words such as "avil" (year) and "sum" (foot, measurement of length) singularia tantum or pluralia tantum?

Were Etruscan words such as "avil" (year) and "sum" (foot, measurement of length) singularia tantum or pluralia tantum? Would adjectives applied to them be declined in singular or ...
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1answer
77 views

Are "pater", "parens", "parturitio", & "partitio" etymologically related?

Are pater (father), parens (procreator), parturitio (parturition), and partitio (partition) etymologically related? Phonetic and semantic similarities lead me to think they might be related. I can't ...
8
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1answer
130 views

What are the precise meaning of "in-law" terms?

What is the exact definition of the in-law terms? Note that Latin terms do not necessarily align with English terms. For example, Latin patruus, and avunculus are both English "uncle" (on ...
5
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1answer
280 views

Latin suffixes in the noun "vertebra"?

I find it hard to remember the suffixes in the word vertebra: -e arcus vertebrae, lamina arcus vertebrae, pediculus arcus vertebrae, corpus vertebrae vertebrae thoracicae, vertebrae lumbalis -lis ...
4
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1answer
145 views

Nouns in locative in connection to adjectives (Does every adjective have a locative?)

I've did a bit of research on locatives and which words can form a locative. On a German website (Link) I found an explanation which words can have a locative: geographical names (like cities and ...
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116 views

What are the differences between "demens" and "insanus"? Are there any single Latin words (nouns) for "insane person"?

First, I'm struggling with understanding the difference between demens and insanum. My understanding is that demens is an adjective (insane). I've also seen insanum in a few online dictionaries (here'...
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1answer
522 views

Why are so many Latin men's names (cognomina) in the usually-feminine first declension?

The first declension, with the -a ending, is usually feminine. Why are so many men's names (cognomina), however, in the first declension -- Seneca, Cinna, Aggrippa, Sulla, and more? This is far out of ...
12
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3answers
869 views

How to decline a whale?

The Latin word cētus (a whale or some other major sea creature) behaves peculiarly. In singular it is a normal-looking masculine cētus, but in plural it is a neuter cētē. The ...
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2answers
1k views

How should one latinize this name?

A friend of mine, whose name is Raoni (he's brazilian, his name comes from a native root, also the tonic vowel is the very last [i]), started learning latin and I've been studying for a while. I ...
2
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1answer
181 views

How to determine the ending of a Latin noun?

In LLPSI, I have seen Latin be Latina, Latinum, and Latinae. What are the differences of these words and how do I determine which to use?
2
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1answer
117 views

Is the word nihilanus/nihilumanus properly constructed? (From "nihil/nihilum" meaning "nothing" and the suffix "-anus" to denote origin)

I've been reading that the word silvanus comes from Latin silva (“forest”) +‎ -ānus (“from, of the”). So, "silvanus" literally means something like "who comes from the forest" or something similar. I ...
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2answers
189 views

masculine and feminine form of παῖς and μαθηματικός

As in a previous question, I'm wondering what is the feminine form of a noun, and this time it is not a word for an animal but for human. In words like ὁ παῖς and ἡ παῖς, only their article ...
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1answer
235 views

feminine form of λύκος

λύκος is the Ancient Greek word for 'wolf' in singular masculine form. What is then the feminine form of wolf? I've guessed it as λύκη but what I've found in a dictionary is that it means 'light'. Is ...
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3answers
595 views

Is there a diminutive form for agent nouns?

I recently read a joke about the use of Latin -tor and -trix nouns in modern English. The punchline was that "trix is for kids". This got me wondering: Is there a way to make diminutives from agent ...
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1answer
191 views

How did vāti-s become vātēs?

To my understanding, vātēs "bard" started out as an i-stem noun, built on the stem vāti- (probably from something like *weh₂t-i-). So I would expect the nominative to look something like *vāti-s. ...
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1answer
282 views

Why "per capita"?

I don't speak Latin and I can't think of a non-dumb way to ask this. But my understanding is that capita is the plural form of caput. So I'm wondering how "per capita" makes any sense, then, as it ...
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3answers
208 views

Where does the word "tudes" 'hammer' show up in texts?

Lewis and Short has an entry for a noun tŭdes, with the genitive singular given as "is (ĭtis, acc. to Fest. p. 253 Müll.)". It is defined as "a hammer, mallet". The two citations in the entry show the ...
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2answers
142 views

Can "ave, vire" be used colloquially as "hey, bro"?

There's a Spanish webcomic called ¡Eh, tío!, an expression that can be translated into English as hey, man or maybe as hey, bro. The webcomic had some time ago a story arc set in an alternate universe ...
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0answers
251 views

What is known about the feminine natural gender for trees in classical Latin?

It is a well known fact of Latin grammar, that trees follow natural gender and are always feminine, even when the word form would suggest masculine gender, as in populus "poplar". What does motivate ...
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2answers
943 views

What is a romance in Latin?

The word "romance" seems to come from Latin, but no similar Latin word appears to mean anything related. Is there a good Latin word for a romance, a kind of an intimate relationship? I cannot think of ...
6
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1answer
244 views

When were different agent noun endings used in Ancient Greek?

In Ancient Greek, it seems that there were various endings for agent nouns. Thomas Dwight Goodell's School Grammar of Attic Greek (1902) mentions -τηρ, -τωρ, -της, -εύς, -τειρα, -τρια, -τρις (-τριδ-), ...
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1answer
122 views

Genitives like "axeos"

I recently encountered a text written in Latin in Finland about two centuries ago using the form axeos. From context it was clear that it was a genitive, and it looks just like the Greek genitive of ...
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3answers
233 views

Do any non-second-declension neuter nouns end in m?

I have the impression that the ending -m appears on neuter nouns (in the nominative/accusative form) only in the second declension, but I don't know whether there are any exceptions. Is there any ...
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3answers
376 views

What did σκάλα exactly mean in Byzantine Greek?

In Spanish we have a word escala that means "stopover" as "a break in a journey", specially when travelling by sea. According to the dictionary by the Royal Spanish Academy, the word comes from ...
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2answers
192 views

Did the word "citione" meaning "bump in the head" exist in Latin?

In the Spanish language site someone asked about the etymology of the word chichón (link in Spanish), meaning bump (typically in the head as a result of a hit). The most common theory is that it is ...
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1answer
3k views

Why did "cattus" replace Latin "feles"?

The word for cat is now, in almost every European language, derived from Latin cattus, as stated in Etymonline. It also says that the word was [...] in general use on the continent by c. 700, ...
2
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1answer
111 views

Is the third person passive perfect of a verb a source of nouns, e.g. "benedictus" from "bendico"?

I always get confused with benedictus. It Christian prayers, it is found both as a noun and as a (passive) verb, e.g. benedictus est. When est is omitted (not uncommon in Latin, it seems), both look ...
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4answers
770 views

Could "essentia" be understood in Latin as "the act of being"?

Almost every verb has a noun that implies "the act and effect of" whatever the verb is. So, an existence is the act of existing. Nonetheless, the most simple verb, to be seems to lack such a noun, at ...
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2answers
107 views

Was there any difference between "grātĭa" and "făvor"?

The Lewis & Short dictionary defines gratia as: grātĭa, ae, f. gratus; lit., favor, both that in which one stands with others and that which one shows to others. I. Favor which one finds ...
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2answers
129 views

How do you address someone in a case other than the vocative?

Suppose I'm talking to someone directly, and use a pronoun to refer to someone. I would use tu or vōs with an appropriate case based on its role in the sentence: for example, sciō tē adesse, "I know ...
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2answers
120 views

What categories of substantives of the second declension are feminine?

Some categories of substantive nouns are always feminine, even when they are of the second declension, such as trees. What other categories are there? And are there also many exocategorical examples? ...
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3answers
448 views

Noun adjuncts in Latin

So this question asks about forming adjectives from nouns, but no clear answer is really given for a general method. In english, you can just use a noun as a adjective without any modification by ...
5
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1answer
79 views

What sort of Greek words are regularly distinguished only by tone?

In the postscript to this answer, Varro comments: …the L&S entry for ἰχθυβολος shows two possible accents, a paroxytone ἰχθυβόλος for an active meaning, and a proparoxytone ἰχθύβολος for a ...
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1answer
283 views

Latin etymology of Spanish "tarde"

In Spanish, the word "tarde" has two different meanings: The part of the day between noon and dusk. Equivalent to the English noun "afternoon". Happening after the due, usual, or proper time. ...
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2answers
2k views

Tantibus: genuine Latin word, or made-up?

I came across the word tantibus while reading this page (as part of a bigger word, amalgotantibus), where it's claimed to be Latin for "nightmare"; a little bit of digging also revealed that it's the ...
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1answer
1k views

Does the word "negotium" literally mean "not otium"?

Spanish word ocio (English: 'leisure') and negocio (English: 'business` among other meanings) come from Latin otium and negotium. Spanish ocio also gave ocioso, as in estar ocioso (English: 'to be ...
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2answers
1k views

Do plural names referring to a singular thing require a plural verb?

Another question related to my geography of the Roman Empire which I am writing has arisen: during the time of Trajan, 117 AD, there were several provinces which had names in the plural, especially ...
13
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1answer
3k views

Etymology of "salarium" and its connection to salt

It has been asked before both in the English Language & Usage site and the Spanish Language site about the etymology of salary and salario, respectively. In both cases, this site was mentioned as ...
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3answers
296 views

Why νώ (rather than νῶ) from νόω? (Greek)

Consider these masculine nominative singular and masculine nominative dual forms: νοῦς, νώ κανοῦν, κανώ μνᾶ, μνᾶ γῆ, γᾶ I understand that the circumflex in these forms represents an acute ...
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1answer
174 views

Interchange between u- and o-stem forms in suffixed derivatives (e.g. "lectus", "lectuarius")

A little while back, I asked a question about the alleged Latin word "tribalis" (which it seems was not actually used), and I mentioned that it seemed to me that it would be an irregular formation ...
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6answers
2k views

Was "oscŭlum" a cultured word in Latin?

The Spanish language has two words for kiss: Beso, from Latin basium. Ósculo, from Latin oscŭlum. The second one is very seldom used, and only in literature as it is a cultured word. Nonetheless, it ...
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2answers
130 views

What is the diminutive of κῆτος?

A classic diminutive suffix in Ancient Greek is -ίδιον, which forms a neuter second noun. But what happens when this is applied to a noun with a vowel in the stem? For a concrete example, if I wanted ...