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Questions tagged [noun]

For questions about nouns.

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Is -is the feminine singular nominative endings of third-declension adjectives with three or two nominative singular forms?

Learn to Read Latin says on p151 in Section 74 Third-Declension Adjectives: To find the stem of third-declension adjectives with three or two nominative singular forms, take the feminine singular ...
Tim's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
89 views

What if a name is male but ends (-a)?

I have a friend which his name is Darma. A sanskrit name, should I use first declension? I doubt it because first declension is female noun.
William Sukaryo Prasetyo's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
376 views

Which Latin declension do feminine nouns in -o (gen. in -us) belong to?

While the answer should be obvious because of the genitive in -us is for the fourth declension, my question is why they are classified as the fourth declension, seeing that they are all Greek nouns ...
Davide's user avatar
  • 175
4 votes
1 answer
243 views

Reimagining the logical gates in Latin

Boolean logic has logical gates which have the following truth tables: NON gate: Input Output 0 1 1 0 AND gate: Input A Input B Output 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 NAND gate: Input A Input B ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
135 views

How to say "Mitmathematiker" (fellow mathematician?) in latin?

I am looking for a general strategy for translating German substantives like "Mitmathematiker" into Latin. My interest in general, and I would like to give some thoughts in some example for ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
501 views

Should these "vellus" be "vellerum"?

I read the following text in the book Método de Latín I by Santiago Segura Munguía, published by the University of Deusto (emphasis mine on the words that cause me difficulty): Multas fabulas a ...
Charo's user avatar
  • 2,092
0 votes
2 answers
151 views

¿Cómo se dice "valor" de ser apreciado en alguna manera por algún observador?

(English version below.) Quiero escribir en latín un pequeño ensayo sobre los diferentes tipos del valor que uno le da a las cosas, pero mi diccionario español-latín me esta dando solamente para ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
207 views

Verb splitting noun and adjective [duplicate]

The concluding prayer of the prime office says: ℣. Dóminus nos benedícat, ✠ et ab omni malo deféndat, et ad vitam perdúcat ætérnam. Why does the verb (perdúcat) split the noun (vitam) and the ...
Geremia's user avatar
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-3 votes
2 answers
260 views

Are vir and fémina counterparts of each other?

pater means father, and mater means mother, and the two words have similar forms. vir means "man; husband", and fémina means "woman; wife". But the two words look very different ...
Tim's user avatar
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-5 votes
1 answer
99 views

Why is virtis a feminine noun, when it can mean "manliness"? [duplicate]

Keller's Learn to Read Latin says virtis, virtutis f. is an abstract noun formed by the addition of the suffix -tis to the stem of the noun vir. Its specific sense is thus "manliness" or “...
Tim's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
210 views

Is there a noun in latin for "failure"?

I'm translating a song and its title is "failure"(the opposite of success) I could find some verbs with a similar meaning but I couldn't find a noun for "failure"
user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
541 views

Adjectives vs nouns and the meaning of a sentence in Familia Romana

Perhaps this is obvious, but I am self-taught at this point. I want to get some basic understanding before I start paying a teacher. I have started reading Familia Romana. I am still looking for the ...
Katie33kate 's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
665 views

Is "levor" a Latin word?

Is "levor, levoris" officially a real word? It has no entry on Wiki or other known sources.
user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
1k views

Why does canis have both masculine and feminine forms?

Most nouns in Latin (and e.g. Spanish) have only one gender. Some other have two (epicene nouns). canis is one example (Separate Q: are there more examples?) I wonder why is that the case for canis. ...
luchonacho's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
371 views

How do you say, "Boy, you got a good scald on that chicken," in Latin?

Ed Couch once complimented his wife's cooking, saying: Boy, you got a good scald on that chicken! I'd really like to be able to say that in Latin, so here's my attempt: Euge, frigimentum pulchrum ...
Expedito Bipes's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is there a Latin word for 225th anniversary?

If bicentennial is the Latin word for the 200th anniversary, what word would one use for the 225th anniversary?
Michael Barnett's user avatar
10 votes
2 answers
3k views

Is there a suffix that means "like", or "resembling"?

What would be the appropriate suffix to add to a word to say that it resembles the noun? In English, we have the example of "Roguelike" (or Rogue-like), which is a style of video game. It's ...
Adam's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
265 views

How do I create an agent noun from velle?

In a previous question, I asked how to make an agent noun from volo, with the intended verb volare. In the comments, it was mentioned that volo is also a form of the irregular verb, velle. Is there an ...
Adam's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
380 views

How do I create an agent noun from volo?

I'd like to create an agent noun from the verb volo (volare), meaning "one who flies". For some additional context, this will be used as a name for an animal that flies but has ...
Adam's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
169 views

Double (identical) subject

What does one call a construction like; The father works as a physician. which becomes: Pater medicus laborat. Where we have multiple subjects. Now I now "medicus" would be the predicate ...
Ruh Muhaccer's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
316 views

why all tree names in Latin are femininum? [duplicate]

Why most of the tree names in Latin are femininum? Is there any historical/etymological reason for it? quercus [quercūs, f.] betula [betulæ, f.] alnus [alni, f.] fraxinus [fraxini, f.] populus [...
Petr Chloupek's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
76 views

Ancient Greek - Adverb functions as Noun

Aristotle's Metaphysics, 994a,26-7: ἀεὶ γάρ ἐστι μεταξύ, ὥσπερ τοῦ εἶναι καὶ μὴ εἶναι γένεσις, οὕτω καὶ τὸ γιγνόμενον τοῦ ὄντος καὶ μὴ ὄντος Reeve's translation: for there is always an intermediate,...
Ali Nikzad's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
457 views

Concrete 4th and 5th declension nouns

I am having a hard time finding fourth and fifth declension nouns for teaching, because the common examples represent abstract concepts (like spēs). The common example domus is irregular. What are ...
Dan R.'s user avatar
  • 283
11 votes
2 answers
1k views

Gen. 1:20 is reptile ablative?

In Genesis 1:20 in the Vulgate: Dixit etiam Deus : Producant aquae reptile animae viventis, et volatile super terram sub firmamento caeli. why is it not reptiles animas?
Stephen Perencevich's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
168 views

Are Κηφάς (a Greek proper name), κεϕαλή (head), and πέτρος (rock) etymologically related?

Saint Peter was named Cephas by Jesus, which is recorded in the gospels as the Greek translation Πέτρος. Are Κηφάς (a Greek proper name < Aramaic כיפא‎, kēp̄ā, "rock"), κεϕαλή (head), and ...
Geremia's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
195 views

Creating place names from Latin verbs?

Latin words like crematorium and vomitorium seem to be made from verb + -torium Is there a pattern to this I can follow for arbitrary verbs? Furor + -torium = furotorium Or Farcio + -torium = ...
AncientSwordRage's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
118 views

Are pignus, pinguedo, & piger etymologically related?

Are pignus (pledge), pinguedo (fat), and piger (lazy person) etymologically related? de Vaan p. 465 says: The etymology [of pignus] is uncertain, since one can imagine a meaning "pledge, surety&...
Geremia's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
534 views

Why is there no case agreement between "magni" and "poetae"?

Shouldn't "magni" be "magnae" as it is modifying "poetae"? Fīliae vestrae dē libris magnī poētae saepe cogitābant. The quote is from Wheelock's Latin, chapter 6.
Antichrist's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
681 views

Is the dative plural of anima animis or animabus?

Some paradigms I have seen give the dative plural of anima as animis. However, other word lists claim that anima, filia, famula and dea are irregular and that the dative and ablative plural are ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 7,077
4 votes
1 answer
67 views

How do you translate "herbarium of peril" into Latin?

Is "herbaria pericula" an accurate translation? What is the grammatically correct way to express "peril herbaria/herbarium of peril"? Compound words This question is for a name of ...
tiina's user avatar
  • 41
9 votes
3 answers
775 views

Is it grammatically correct to attributively use nominative forms of nouns in New Latin?

There are some muscle names in New Latin that seem to be nouns as far as I can tell, such as flexor and extensor. However, according to several Wikipedia articles for these muscles, they behave as if ...
Vun-Hugh Vaw's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
281 views

Second declension feminine plants

Is there any reason why some well-known plant names, especially tree names, are feminine, but 2nd declension? (now interested in classical, not scientific ones). For example: Trees: aesculus alnus ...
Vladimir F Героям слава's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
64 views

Were Etruscan words such as "avil" (year) and "sum" (foot, measurement of length) singularia tantum or pluralia tantum?

Were Etruscan words such as "avil" (year) and "sum" (foot, measurement of length) singularia tantum or pluralia tantum? Would adjectives applied to them be declined in singular or ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
187 views

Are "pater", "parens", "parturitio", & "partitio" etymologically related?

Are pater (father), parens (procreator), parturitio (parturition), and partitio (partition) etymologically related? Phonetic and semantic similarities lead me to think they might be related. I can't ...
Geremia's user avatar
  • 3,700
8 votes
1 answer
327 views

What are the precise meaning of "in-law" terms?

What is the exact definition of the in-law terms? Note that Latin terms do not necessarily align with English terms. For example, Latin patruus, and avunculus are both English "uncle" (on ...
Joshua Fox's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
525 views

Latin suffixes in the noun "vertebra"?

I find it hard to remember the suffixes in the word vertebra: -e arcus vertebrae, lamina arcus vertebrae, pediculus arcus vertebrae, corpus vertebrae vertebrae thoracicae, vertebrae lumbalis -lis ...
hhh's user avatar
  • 171
4 votes
1 answer
331 views

Nouns in locative in connection to adjectives (Does every adjective have a locative?)

I've did a bit of research on locatives and which words can form a locative. On a German website (Link) I found an explanation which words can have a locative: geographical names (like cities and ...
Cyb3rKo's user avatar
  • 626
3 votes
0 answers
177 views

What are the differences between "demens" and "insanus"? Are there any single Latin words (nouns) for "insane person"?

First, I'm struggling with understanding the difference between demens and insanum. My understanding is that demens is an adjective (insane). I've also seen insanum in a few online dictionaries (here'...
mig81's user avatar
  • 263
13 votes
1 answer
658 views

Why are so many Latin men's names (cognomina) in the usually-feminine first declension?

The first declension, with the -a ending, is usually feminine. Why are so many men's names (cognomina), however, in the first declension -- Seneca, Cinna, Aggrippa, Sulla, and more? This is far out of ...
Joshua Fox's user avatar
12 votes
3 answers
967 views

How to decline a whale?

The Latin word cētus (a whale or some other major sea creature) behaves peculiarly. In singular it is a normal-looking masculine cētus, but in plural it is a neuter cētē. The ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
1k views

How should one latinize this name?

A friend of mine, whose name is Raoni (he's brazilian, his name comes from a native root, also the tonic vowel is the very last [i]), started learning latin and I've been studying for a while. I ...
Ergative Man's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
531 views

How to determine the ending of a Latin noun?

In LLPSI, I have seen Latin be Latina, Latinum, and Latinae. What are the differences of these words and how do I determine which to use?
James's user avatar
  • 529
2 votes
1 answer
177 views

Is the word nihilanus/nihilumanus properly constructed? (From "nihil/nihilum" meaning "nothing" and the suffix "-anus" to denote origin)

I've been reading that the word silvanus comes from Latin silva (“forest”) +‎ -ānus (“from, of the”). So, "silvanus" literally means something like "who comes from the forest" or something similar. I ...
G. Cuticchia's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
265 views

masculine and feminine form of παῖς and μαθηματικός

As in a previous question, I'm wondering what is the feminine form of a noun, and this time it is not a word for an animal but for human. In words like ὁ παῖς and ἡ παῖς, only their article ...
kore's user avatar
  • 517
4 votes
1 answer
267 views

feminine form of λύκος

λύκος is the Ancient Greek word for 'wolf' in singular masculine form. What is then the feminine form of wolf? I've guessed it as λύκη but what I've found in a dictionary is that it means 'light'. Is ...
kore's user avatar
  • 517
8 votes
3 answers
694 views

Is there a diminutive form for agent nouns?

I recently read a joke about the use of Latin -tor and -trix nouns in modern English. The punchline was that "trix is for kids". This got me wondering: Is there a way to make diminutives from agent ...
Dhi's user avatar
  • 83
5 votes
1 answer
201 views

How did vāti-s become vātēs?

To my understanding, vātēs "bard" started out as an i-stem noun, built on the stem vāti- (probably from something like *weh₂t-i-). So I would expect the nominative to look something like *vāti-s. ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 68.1k
11 votes
1 answer
387 views

Why "per capita"?

I don't speak Latin and I can't think of a non-dumb way to ask this. But my understanding is that capita is the plural form of caput. So I'm wondering how "per capita" makes any sense, then, as it ...
ЯegDwight's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
275 views

Where does the word "tudes" 'hammer' show up in texts?

Lewis and Short has an entry for a noun tŭdes, with the genitive singular given as "is (ĭtis, acc. to Fest. p. 253 Müll.)". It is defined as "a hammer, mallet". The two citations in the entry show the ...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 29.5k
3 votes
2 answers
250 views

Can "ave, vire" be used colloquially as "hey, bro"?

There's a Spanish webcomic called ¡Eh, tío!, an expression that can be translated into English as hey, man or maybe as hey, bro. The webcomic had some time ago a story arc set in an alternate universe ...
Charlie's user avatar
  • 2,219