Questions tagged [new-latin]

Questions regarding Latin in the modern era, approximately 1400–1900

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21
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1answer
2k views

Why did scientists abandon Latin in their publications?

Whereas the Latin language was used by almost every scientist until the 18th century, this is a fact that since then the use of Latin in scientific publication has fastly decreased: the best example ...
19
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3answers
279 views

What is the meaning of "suffragio" at the time of Calvin?

In the 1559 edition of Calvin's Institutes, he writes: Quare dum illam recipit, ac suffragio suo obsignat, non ex dubia aut alioqui controversa authenticam reddit Ford L. Battles renders it this ...
17
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1answer
591 views

Was "mendicus" a term for the impotent or idle poor?

I came across the term mendicus in a 16th century English parish register. According to Lewis & Short it means: "beggarly, needy, in want, indigent". I understand the word derives from menda ...
14
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2answers
1k views

Constructing Latin diminutives

In the course of trying to construct an accurate diminutive form of the word abdomen - which for the record is Latin in origin (in the form abdōmen), having been borrowed by English via Middle French -...
14
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2answers
532 views

Is there a semantic difference between the two perfect tenses in medieval Latin?

In medieval Latin active perfect forms started to use the auxiliary verb habere with perfect participle. Thus amavi would be replaced with amatum habeo. These two constructions must have coexisted for ...
13
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2answers
280 views

Translation of a Jodocus Hondius map inscription

Could anyone help me understand the meaning of the Latin in this Jodocus Hondius map from the early 1600s? Exquisita & magno aliquot mensium periculo lustrata et iam retecta Freti Magellanici ...
13
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2answers
258 views

Why were some medieval maps made in Latin?

Documents in Medieval Latin states that (page 18) Large numbers of maps, from small areas such as the English counties to world maps, were published from the early 16th century onwards. Many ...
13
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1answer
383 views

Use of ß (“eszett”) in Latin text

I am translating a medical text from the late 16th century. The author is Swiss. The text uses the ß character (like the German eszett). Example: toti amplißimo conseßui Is this character being ...
12
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4answers
4k views

How would you say "cafe" in Latin?

I would like to say, "I'm going to the cafe" in Latin, but the best I can come up with is "Eo ad cafe." What would be a good choice for "cafe"? I'm not sure if a similar concept existed in Ancient ...
12
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3answers
363 views

Help with Latin translation from a 17th century ecclesiastical Latin book

The book is Panoplia Clericalis, and the passage I'm having difficulty with (which I suspect is much easier than I think) is, from page 602: De colorum mixtione, qui differunt, ex varia eorum ...
12
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1answer
144 views

'Quae pars anterior quae posterior jure habeatur in toto genere non liquet': taxonomical description of Antarctissa denticulata (Ehrenberg 1844)

In one of his 1844 manuscripts, C. G. Ehrenberg described the radiolarian species Lithobotrys(?) denticulata (now known as Antarctissa denticulata) and, as it was customary at the time, did so in ...
12
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1answer
4k views

The many forms of William?

In my genealogical research in England I have come across many different spellings of the name William in Latin documents: Gulielmus, Guglielmus, Wilhelmus, Willelmus, to name just a few. I know that ...
12
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1answer
646 views

What are New Latin's comma rules?

What are New Latin's comma rules? Specifically, where do New Latin's comma rules differ from modern English's comma rules (e.g., as documented in the 16th ed. of the Chicago Manual of Style §§6.15-6....
11
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3answers
3k views

Is Thomas Hobbes' translation of "nosce te ipsum" as "read thyself" valid?

In the introduction to the original, English version of Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes says: … there is another saying not of late understood, by which they might learn truly to read one another,...
11
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2answers
800 views

What is "parecbolae"?

Researching an answer for this question, I found a book of regulations of the University of Oxford, dating from the early 19th century. The title is: I cannot find the meaning of Parecbolae anywhere. ...
11
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2answers
391 views

Quid a "hic", "munere" significat Linnæus?

These words are inscribed over the entrance to the University of Pavia: Quid hic? Intueri naturam. Quo munere? Curiosum esse. They're translated here into Italian, which I'll translate into English ...
11
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1answer
368 views

What does Q.B.V.D. stand for on the title page of a dissertation?

I have seen Q.B.V.D. as the first line of titles pages of academic dissertations, like this one: https://books.google.nl/books?id=YmpZAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA3&lpg=PA3&dq=Q.B.V.D&source=bl&...
10
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3answers
2k views

How do you say "online" and "offline" in Latin?

Good day! How would you go about saying the expression "online" or "offline" in Latin? Maybe something like Portuguese Conectado and Desconectado (connected and disconnected)? Couldn't find it ...
10
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2answers
1k views

What is the superlative of ipse?

In later Latin, as ipse started to lose its force, Petronius uses ipsimus for emphasis: Tamen ad delicias ipsimi [domini] annos quattuordecim fui. Nec turpe est, quod dominus iubet. Ego tamen et ...
10
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2answers
580 views

"Non possunt dari" translation

Please could someone explain what I am missing here? In Spinoza's The Ethics, Proposition V is said: PROPOSITIO V: In rerum natura non possunt dari duæ aut plures substantiæ ejusdem naturæ sive ...
10
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1answer
117 views

Rupes Recta, The Straight Wall, Correct Translation

Rupes recta is the name given to a feature on the Moon. This feature is also known as the straight wall or straight cliff. Is rupes recta the correct Latin phrase for straight wall or straight cliff? ...
10
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1answer
333 views

Interpretation of circumflex in a poem from 1621

A poem from 1621 contains one ô and one â. The ô is the interjection ô and the â is in the relative pronoun quâ. No circumflexes are used elsewhere in the poem. Does the circumflex (or caret or ...
10
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1answer
772 views

How to pronounce "Roterodamus"?

The adjective roterodamus means “of Rotterdam” (the city in Holland). To lovers of Latin, unless they entertain an unusual interest in Dutch geography, the word is familiar probably primarily because ...
10
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1answer
134 views

Latin for "ground meat"

Trying to translate a cooking recipe into Latin, I stumbled upon the ingredient “ground meat” and wondered how to best render this in Latin. Since ground meat is not actually, well, ground (molita, ...
10
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1answer
142 views

Interpreting symbol at the end of entries in Latin probate act book?

While transcribing entries in a 16th century Latin probate act book, I have come across a symbol that commonly appears at the end of entries, and sometimes within entries: What does it represent? Is ...
10
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1answer
122 views

How do you say "imply" in Latin?

I need to know how to say the present, past and future tense of "imply" in Latin. I don't know much Latin, I just need the grammatically correct way to say: "Implied ______" For example, for "Implied ...
10
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1answer
248 views

Translating Scientific Latin

For my high school English class, which is a translation "workshop," we're all expected to give class-long, individual sessions focusing around a translation we've performed from whatever language we ...
10
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1answer
193 views

Should motum be translated as emotions?

Calvin's commentary on Romans 1:18 (Latin, English translation by MacKenzie): Ira, ἀνθρωποπαθῶς, more Scripturae pro ultione Dei: quia Deus puniens, prae se fert (nostra opinione) irascentis faciem. ...
10
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0answers
95 views

the kiskis and kankan debate: primary sources

There's a very famous story about how in the middle of the sixteenth century the Sorbonne University filed a legal claim to the Parlement de Paris re: the correct pronunciation of qu- in Latin, viz. ...
9
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3answers
688 views

Is it grammatically correct to attributively use nominative forms of nouns in New Latin?

There are some muscle names in New Latin that seem to be nouns as far as I can tell, such as flexor and extensor. However, according to several Wikipedia articles for these muscles, they behave as if ...
9
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2answers
4k views

Latin words for “engineer”

While I was reading La révolution industrielle au Moyen Âge (The Medieval Machine: The Industrial Revolution of the Middle Ages) by Jean Gimpel, I’ve read: In the old texts, James of Saint George ...
9
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1answer
1k views

How to say "black market" in Latin?

How does one say "black market" in Latin? According to the OED, this word first originated in English in 1727.
9
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1answer
295 views

On two types of S in a text from 1759

I ended up studying this poem last year: This is a congratulatory poem in a dissertation at the Academy of Turku from 1759. It is on page 4 of the full dissertation. I also published an English ...
8
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3answers
442 views

Was "dominus" or similar used with a title?

If a person is addressed formally with a title, it seems to vary from language to language (and to some extent within a single language) whether a word like "Mr" or "Herr" (German) is used. In Finnish ...
8
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3answers
300 views

A phrase of L. Euler on functions

I'm trying to understand the following sentence from Leonhard Euler's Institutionum calculi integralis Vol. III Chap. 2, bottom of p.40: Huiusmodi functiones arbitrarias, prouti hic feci, eiusmodi ...
8
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2answers
794 views

What does the word "recusus" mean in book titles?

A bit of a mystery here (for someone not very well-versed in Latin at least). I often encounter the word recusus in book titles of the post-classical period, usually but not always in conjunction with ...
8
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2answers
617 views

English "Master" vs. "Mister" translated in Latin

I'm writing a novel in which Latin-speaking students at Oxford in 1560's are talking. In English, they'd be referring respectfully to gentlemen who weren't noblemen as "master," and noblemen as "lord....
8
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1answer
285 views

What is the exact translation of 'solummodo'?

What is the exact meaning of 'solummodo'? I take it is an adverb, perhaps? Encountered this in new Latin, more precisely in Spinoza's Ethics. It is translated as 'only', but it is not in my dictionary,...
8
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2answers
169 views

What does the Latin abbreviation "Form." stand for?

I came across a medal commemorating the coronation of Charles XV in 1860. The inscriptions on the medal are all in Latin. I am aware of a few latin abbreviations centered around the creators of medals ...
8
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1answer
123 views

Gender and number in medieval composite active perfect

I am not sure of correct terminology, but let me call the medieval perfect tenses like amatum habeo — as opposed to the classical amavi — the "composite active perfect". One would expect ...
7
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3answers
1k views

Phrase grammar, curae or curo

I have a phrase and I'm concerned with grammar. Which one would be more proper? et ego non curae or et ego non curo Phrase meaning would be "I don't care."
7
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2answers
265 views

Is filius necessarily a biological descendant?

I saw a Latin inscription in a church in Rome years ago, and there was an interesting feature. It mentioned a pope and his filius. We were a couple of Latinists and we agreed that so it said, but we ...
7
votes
1answer
358 views

'idem hercle esset' meaning?

What could be the meaning of hercle in this context? Si quis ergo diceret se claram et distinctam hoc est veram ideam substantiæ habere et nihilominus dubitare num talis substantia existat, idem ...
7
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2answers
154 views

Why is perfect passive participle from 'enuntio' - 'enunciatus'?

In my dictionary enuntio is first conjugation verb, enuntio, avi, are Now in Spinoza there came up this word - 'enunciatum', which is said to be (source - Wictionary) coming from enuntio, as ...
7
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1answer
162 views

Short vowels in lucubrando

I came across a poem from 1621 written in Sapphic stanza. It contains this line: pervigil Christi, lucubrando sudans To scan that, the third word must be lŭcŭbrandŏ. L&S ...
7
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2answers
2k views

How to parse "semper eadem" grammatically?

The phrase semper eadem, "always the same", is a fairly popular motto. It is easy enough to interpret semantically, but I could not convince myself about the exact grammatical interpretation of the ...
7
votes
1answer
204 views

What does 'ad tantam mollem' refer to in this context?

This is from an explanation of the six Ptolemaic statements, the one that concludes that the world is round (terram esse rotundam). Terra tamen ob duritiem non potuit perfectam rotunditatem ...
7
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1answer
168 views

Can Veneti and Antuerpiae be vocatives?

I am puzzling over: caveat veneti et antuerpiae exemplo tiri et tu lundina This was written in the margin of a sixteenth-century commentary on Isaiah at chapter 23, which is on Tyre. My translation ...
7
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1answer
265 views

Is there a New Latin word for Cyborg?

Good day! Originally cyborg came from English cybernatic organism. In Latin that would of course be organismus cyberneticus. Given the mouthful of that, it is no wonder that people tend to simply use ...
6
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5answers
889 views

The English Gentleman

Here is The English Gentleman as depicted by Richard Braithwait in 1630: This is a thirty-part question. Can you tell: (a) What are the Latin words in each box? (b) What do they literally mean? (c)...