Questions tagged [new-latin]

Questions regarding Latin in the modern era, approximately 1400–1900

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2
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1answer
67 views

What are the verb conjugation names called in Latin?

What are the terms in Latin for the Latin verb conjugations? I would like to also know the Latin for the mixed conjugation (or if preferred that known as the io sub conjugation) and any term for verbs ...
8
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3answers
639 views

Is it grammatically correct to attributively use nominative forms of nouns in New Latin?

There are some muscle names in New Latin that seem to be nouns as far as I can tell, such as flexor and extensor. However, according to several Wikipedia articles for these muscles, they behave as if ...
10
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1answer
130 views

Latin for "ground meat"

Trying to translate a cooking recipe into Latin, I stumbled upon the ingredient “ground meat” and wondered how to best render this in Latin. Since ground meat is not actually, well, ground (molita, ...
3
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2answers
225 views

Does anyone know what the New Latin adaption of iens (family to eo) was?

I am guessing jens since j was the most common heading alphabet for replacing i as a first letter. Addendum for clarity: One of New Latin's nominations was the adjustment to spelling of certain words, ...
9
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1answer
1k views

How to say "black market" in Latin?

How does one say "black market" in Latin? According to the OED, this word first originated in English in 1727.
2
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2answers
87 views

Translation help: Prospero Mandosio on Ottavio Durante

Preliminary note It was suggested I could split the question into several questions. If the community thinks this is a better approach, do let me know in the comments, and I will split it into two or ...
5
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1answer
88 views

Proper way to say "Traveler's Writ/Licence/Certificate"

I am looking for more or less the 'proper' (or any good approximation) way to translate a "Traveler's Writ," as in a certificate or license given to a traveler that allows him legal access to an area. ...
10
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1answer
770 views

How to pronounce "Roterodamus"?

The adjective roterodamus means “of Rotterdam” (the city in Holland). To lovers of Latin, unless they entertain an unusual interest in Dutch geography, the word is familiar probably primarily because ...
5
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3answers
183 views

What was the decision regarding this Paris convent in 1561?

This is the decision of the General Chapter of the Dominicans regarding some trouble in the Paris convent in 1561. Fratres vero Antonium Abeli magistrum et Dominicum Sergent ut indignos denegamus, ...
4
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3answers
299 views

Why is specifically "Latin America" called that when numerous other regions' languages are also based on the Latin language?

There's an entire major region, spanning the entire South America and parts of North America, called "Latin America". People there tend to speak Spanish and closely related languages. There's also the ...
7
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1answer
168 views

Can Veneti and Antuerpiae be vocatives?

I am puzzling over: caveat veneti et antuerpiae exemplo tiri et tu lundina This was written in the margin of a sixteenth-century commentary on Isaiah at chapter 23, which is on Tyre. My translation ...
3
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1answer
84 views

Translation Help Needed in Euler's E025

Related to a previous question of mine, I'm working through the first paragraph of E025, Euler's Methodus Generalis Summandi Progressiones (available for download here). A translation has already been ...
3
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1answer
106 views

What is the ablative construction at play here?

I am reading Historia plantarvm vniuersalis. There are many sentences I do not understand, but the particular one I would like to ask about is on page 10 (page 26 in the link): Literal transcription: ...
3
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1answer
68 views

Tenses in the Christmas carol "Personent hodie"

There is a Christmas carol called "Personent hodie" written in Latin in Finland in the 16th century. In the third verse the three mages are described: Magi tres venerunt, munera offerunt, ...
5
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1answer
178 views

Is this double accusative or hyperbaton or something else?

I've only been learning Latin for a month or so, but I'm specifically learning so that I can read scientific and mathematical texts from the 17th-19th centuries. It's slow going, of course- I'm only ...
3
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0answers
83 views

Was the letter phi used in Latin?

Is there any evidence of the Greek letter phi being borrowed to write Latin words of Greek origin as φilosoφia for example? The question is not restricted to Classical Latin.
4
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2answers
893 views

"Blood for the Blood God" vs "Gloria In Excelsis Deo"

I play a scifi game where you build your own pieces and the language in the game is a derivative of Latin. I want to write a couple battle cries/prayers on the sides of one of my game pieces. The ...
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1answer
66 views

What is a latin stem for swap?

I don't know if I asked this question correctly, but what is a latin stem for swap? I don't specifically need it to be just swap. You can answer my question by saying a latin stm for switch, or ...
5
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1answer
123 views

What are the Latin translations of the mathematical terms differentiating, integrating and parameterizing?

I didn't find any site that translates these verbs in the mathematical sense. What are the Latin translations of these terms, and are there any sites that offer Latin translations of modern ...
3
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1answer
162 views

"Gaza tamen aliquoties occiput vertit"

In a footnote of Vives' Dialogs (for the word "Ad brechma"): Ad Brechma, brechma, tis; sive bregma, pars anterior capitis, synciput a Breco Graeco, quod est pluo, et irrigo; haec enim pars ...
11
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3answers
3k views

Is Thomas Hobbes' translation of "nosce te ipsum" as "read thyself" valid?

In the introduction to the original, English version of Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes says: … there is another saying not of late understood, by which they might learn truly to read one another,...
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2answers
238 views

Is there any new published book that is written in latin?

I wondered that is there any new book that is written in latin publishing now ? Like new latin books in 21st century. If so what is the difference of new published books from the literature of ...
6
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1answer
180 views

Euler passage translation (Latin in 18th century)

I would like to include a translation of a brief passage from Euler's music text Tentamen novae theoriae musicae (1739) in an article I am writing, but find the original somewhat tricky to work with. ...
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3answers
1k views

Phrase grammar, curae or curo

I have a phrase and I'm concerned with grammar. Which one would be more proper? et ego non curae or et ego non curo Phrase meaning would be "I don't care."
3
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1answer
991 views

Modification of my Scottish Clan Motto (luceo non uro)

I am in the process of planning out a tattoo, and I want to get my family's clan motto. The Mackenzie Clan motto is Luceo Non Uro Which as I understand translates to "shine not burn." That said, ...
9
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1answer
295 views

On two types of S in a text from 1759

I ended up studying this poem last year: This is a congratulatory poem in a dissertation at the Academy of Turku from 1759. It is on page 4 of the full dissertation. I also published an English ...
12
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1answer
629 views

What are New Latin's comma rules?

What are New Latin's comma rules? Specifically, where do New Latin's comma rules differ from modern English's comma rules (e.g., as documented in the 16th ed. of the Chicago Manual of Style §§6.15-6....
2
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1answer
118 views

19th century Latin textbooks?

What textbooks were used to teach Neo-Latin in primary, secondary, and higher education schools during the 19th century?
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2answers
86 views

Why is Novarupta feminine?

Today is the anniversary of the Novarupta eruption, the largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century. Nova rupta is of course good Latin for "new broken thing", where the thing in question is ...
7
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1answer
252 views

Is there a New Latin word for Cyborg?

Good day! Originally cyborg came from English cybernatic organism. In Latin that would of course be organismus cyberneticus. Given the mouthful of that, it is no wonder that people tend to simply use ...
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2answers
216 views

What can be used as a Latin word for "Meltdown" (in the sense used for people with Autism)?

I have a lesser form of Autism (that generally doesn't really manifest much unless people actually live with me or in specific situations) and sometimes I can have a meltdown. I write a journal in ...
6
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1answer
188 views

Mountains and Mountain Ranges: Names

I have been recently enjoying Mark Walker's delightful translation of Professor Tolkien's masterpiece, The Hobbit (Hobbitus Ille). I was especially charmed by Tolkien's maps, translated into Latin (...
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3answers
218 views

Is there a descriptive modern Latin grammar?

There is a lot of Latin grammars out there, but here I am looking for a specific kind: a descriptive modern Latin grammar. By modern Latin I mean the Latin of our own era. I would like it to be as ...
3
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1answer
113 views

Can I conclude something about pronunciation from I/J and U/V variation?

I reread the inscription in this question about the abbreviation D. O. M. dated to 1749: The variation between I and J caught my eye. It seems to me that: J is used in all consonantal positions. J ...
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3answers
2k views

How do you say "online" and "offline" in Latin?

Good day! How would you go about saying the expression "online" or "offline" in Latin? Maybe something like Portuguese Conectado and Desconectado (connected and disconnected)? Couldn't find it ...
4
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2answers
111 views

Quippe+quod (Early Modern period)

Looking at other posts on quippe+relatives (particularly, at this link:1), there seems to be a consensus that it will usually show up with qui... but not with quod, but I'm currently looking at a ...
3
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1answer
95 views

How does one say lowlands in contemporary Latin?

How would one write the expression "lowlands" in contemporary Latin? Would it be like in Spanish, terra bassa, or would it be something like terra subiecta or even terra infera? I would prefer an ...
3
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0answers
58 views

How to properly convey non-Latin words in a practical Latin text?

My question here is firmly in regards to contemporary Latin, in the sense of Latin to be used not as a dead language (in other words, I am not looking for a Nosoponian answer that invalidates anything ...
6
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1answer
2k views

Latinisation of a surname. Seeking advice from expert Latinists

I have a need to Latinise a surname (details about that name are provided further down in my question) rather urgently, but with my miniscule knowledge of Latin I cannot do that myself well. I hope ...
2
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0answers
64 views

Learning from scratch [duplicate]

I am interested in learning Latin. I have tried to find good resources to do this online but have found a great deal of noise. Does anyone have any good recommendations of how to properly learn Latin ...
7
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2answers
2k views

How to parse "semper eadem" grammatically?

The phrase semper eadem, "always the same", is a fairly popular motto. It is easy enough to interpret semantically, but I could not convince myself about the exact grammatical interpretation of the ...
6
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1answer
124 views

Formation of words like "essive" or "adessive"

In modern linguistic terminology there are grammatical cases named essive and adessive. However, from a Latinate point of view those formations look abnormal: Usually, the ending -ivus is attached to ...
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2answers
1k views

What is the superlative of ipse?

In later Latin, as ipse started to lose its force, Petronius uses ipsimus for emphasis: Tamen ad delicias ipsimi [domini] annos quattuordecim fui. Nec turpe est, quod dominus iubet. Ego tamen et ...
3
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1answer
450 views

Variation in the spelling of word-final M

I recently visited the museum of the main monastery of the Carthusian order near Grenoble. I saw this in an open book on display in a former chamber of a monk: What took me by surprise is the ...
8
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1answer
122 views

Gender and number in medieval composite active perfect

I am not sure of correct terminology, but let me call the medieval perfect tenses like amatum habeo — as opposed to the classical amavi — the "composite active perfect". One would expect ...
14
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2answers
521 views

Is there a semantic difference between the two perfect tenses in medieval Latin?

In medieval Latin active perfect forms started to use the auxiliary verb habere with perfect participle. Thus amavi would be replaced with amatum habeo. These two constructions must have coexisted for ...
14
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2answers
1k views

Constructing Latin diminutives

In the course of trying to construct an accurate diminutive form of the word abdomen - which for the record is Latin in origin (in the form abdōmen), having been borrowed by English via Middle French -...
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2answers
790 views

How to say "Promethean"

My aim is to express "Promethean man" and "Epimethean man" (as in the brothers Prometheus and Epimetheus) in the style of "homo sapiens" and "homo erectus".
3
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3answers
152 views

Monumentum spelled as monimentum

I saw a great number of Latin inscriptions in a cathedral on Malta, dating roughly between 1500 and 1800 CE. There were at least a couple of instances of the word monimentum, but saw no monumentum. Is ...
12
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3answers
363 views

Help with Latin translation from a 17th century ecclesiastical Latin book

The book is Panoplia Clericalis, and the passage I'm having difficulty with (which I suspect is much easier than I think) is, from page 602: De colorum mixtione, qui differunt, ex varia eorum ...