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Questions tagged [new-latin]

Questions regarding Latin in the modern era, approximately 1400–1900

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3 votes
1 answer
80 views

Is "Ita an non" a valid, neutral, straightfoward translation of "Yes or no"?

Asking to really, really be sure since I'm planning on getting it tattoed. I just intend that simple sentence in the more correctly latin way possible, but there are many ways to say it and I don't ...
1 vote
0 answers
36 views

Which verb number does zero take? [duplicate]

(Creating spreadsheets can lead you into unexpected directions.) As many are aware of, the number zero itself, is a fairly recent invention, but words for it of course do and did exist in Latin; ...
11 votes
2 answers
941 views

How to pronounce "Roterodamus"?

The adjective roterodamus means “of Rotterdam” (the city in Holland). To lovers of Latin, unless they entertain an unusual interest in Dutch geography, the word is familiar probably primarily because ...
10 votes
2 answers
537 views

Difficult sentence from Leibniz's Historia Inventionis Phosphori?

In Historia Inventionis Phosphori (link), I'm struggling to parse a sentence in the second paragraph. De cujus inventore anno 1692 Gallico sermone prodiit Viri Egregii & in experimentis hujus ...
3 votes
0 answers
100 views

Why is computatorium considered to be a better word than computatrum? (For the English word "computer")

I was watching a Luke Ranieri video in which he mentioned that computatrum isn't a very good word for computer, and that computatorium is much better, and that people should stop using computatrum. ...
3 votes
0 answers
116 views

What is the best translation of 'Gratus erat' in this context?

In an English manorial court record from the late 17th century we have found: Gratus erat : Thomas Stone quia egrotus erat For context, this is part of a list of individuals who were required ...
1 vote
1 answer
163 views

Is Vulgar Latin just an artificial or constructed version of Classical Latin?

According to what I researched, Vulgar Latin was not standardized like Classical Latin and it was just everyday speech and it evolved into Romance languages that used Vulgar Latin pronounciation. ...
5 votes
1 answer
243 views

Which quotation marks should I use when writing Latin?

What is the most common punctuation used by Latin authors from the Renaissance to the present day to indicate a quotation? Ørberg uses “”, while «» is more common in countries where a Romance language ...
4 votes
0 answers
39 views

Translation of the game hide-and-seek

According to Wikipedia, a kind of hide-and-seek-like games is attested in Ancient Greek as apodidraskinda. Are there attested similar games in Ancient Rome? If not, are there any good options for the ...
5 votes
1 answer
811 views

What's the story behind "vernepator cur"?

NPR and many other sources on the Internet say that vernepator cur is Latin for "the dog that turns the wheel." Apparently, the phrase vernepator cur was really in use in England at one time ...
8 votes
1 answer
659 views

John Owen's poem: Umquam or numquam?

I happened to see one of John Owen's poems, Horologium Vitae, which writes: Latus ad occasum, umquam rediturus ad ortum, Vivo hodie, moriar cras, here natus eram. and it is translated poetically as: ...
5 votes
0 answers
49 views

How would you understand this sentence from Karlstadt's commentary on Augustine's de Spiritu et littera?

In his Augustinkommentar, Karlstadt attacks the opinions of many Catholic "scholastic" theologians. In this passage, he seems to attack both the Thomists and Gabriel Biel, but I lose the ...
5 votes
1 answer
223 views

How did 15th century Dutch “Van Lanckvelt” correspond to neo-Latin “Macropedius”?

The 15th-century Dutch humanist Georgius Macropedius was originally named Joris van Lanckvelt, and his adopted Latin name is generally described as a direct Latinisation of that, without further ...
1 vote
0 answers
41 views

Feedback on my Latin note on the story of Admetus and Alcestis

I’ve written a little précis of the story of Admetus and Alcestis, and would appreciate any corrections or comments. I’m mostly concerned about whether I got the tenses of the subjunctive verbs right,...
3 votes
1 answer
198 views

Can 'superiore' mean 'previous years' (plural)?

Under the year 1558, George Buchanan writes (Rerum Scoticarum Historia, 1582): Hoc anno et superiore etiam, caussa religionis quodam modo iacuisse videbatur, quod morte... In the standard English ...
8 votes
3 answers
2k views

Is there any new published book that is written in latin?

I wondered that is there any new book that is written in latin publishing now ? Like new latin books in 21st century. If so what is the difference of new published books from the literature of ...
3 votes
3 answers
204 views

Is there a way to say "download" and "upload" in Latin?

I checked neolatinlexicon and Google and I couldn't find anything
8 votes
2 answers
2k views

Best modern translation for "Emperor"?

The word "Emperor" seems a bit hard to pin down in Latin when looking for a constant expression to use, because of its multiple synonyms that seem to have been employed frequently throughout ...
11 votes
5 answers
3k views

Tantibus: genuine Latin word, or made-up?

I came across the word tantibus while reading this page (as part of a bigger word, amalgotantibus), where it's claimed to be Latin for "nightmare"; a little bit of digging also revealed that it's the ...
11 votes
4 answers
1k views

Indeclinables: What are the strategies good Latinists use to deal with them?

I have read that the modern tendency is to translate a modern person's personal name into Latin but not his surname. So John Doe would be translated as Ioannes Doe. This seems sensible at face value, ...
0 votes
1 answer
66 views

Any idea what's going on with the middle term of this dedication?

So I think the words are clear enough—Nobilissimo Principi FREDERICO GEORGII ffilio Celsissimi, GEORGII Nep: Augustissimi, CAESARI destinato, M. BRITANNIAE spei, Delicijs, Animaq. desideratissimae, ...
0 votes
0 answers
64 views

Are there any Neo-Latin Sci-Fi or Cyberpunk (original or translation)?

Salvete omnes! I was wondering if anybody knew of any Neo-Latin original sci-fi or cyberpunk story. If not, are there any good translations for modern sci-fi or cyberpunk classics in Latin? If you ...
2 votes
1 answer
76 views

What is going on with the symbol in the weight here?

So this is an image from William Musgrave's account of the Southbroom Hoard discovered outside Devizes, Wiltshire, in England in 1714. They seem to be some local's cache hidden away around the reign ...
3 votes
0 answers
100 views

Is there a modern edition of Diophanti Alexandrini Arithmeticorum Libri?

The text Diophanti Alexandrini Arithmeticorum Libri Sex (Latin translation and commentary on the ancient work of Diophantus) has had a considerable impact on the history of mathematics. I was ...
5 votes
0 answers
78 views

Latin translation of "model"

"model", when meaning "a pattern for imitation", is expressed by Latin exemplum, exemplar, forma, proplasma, according to the dictionary. "model" comes from modulus, ...
6 votes
1 answer
272 views

Feedback on my Latin note an a passage from Ovid’s Metamorphoses

In Metamorphoses 10.728-731, just before Venus causes a flower to spring from Adonis’ blood, Ovid hints at, but doesn’t describe in detail, another metamorphosis: Mint sprouting from the crushed limbs ...
5 votes
0 answers
119 views

How would you say "root locus" (in robotics) in Latin?

"Root locus" is a diagram showing where the poles of a closed-loop system are depending on the amplification (gain) in the open-loop system. How would you say that in Latin? My attempt would ...
1 vote
0 answers
75 views

What do you think is the best way to say sharpshooter in Latin?

I'm imagining a scenario where the Roman Empire lasted a little longer through the development of firearms, and would want a word to describe the concept of a sharpshooter. I'm not sure if this sort ...
7 votes
1 answer
702 views

Is there a New Latin word for Cyborg?

Good day! Originally “cyborg” came from English cybernetic organism. In Latin that would of course be organismus cyberneticus. Given the mouthful of that, it is no wonder that people tend to simply ...
15 votes
1 answer
6k views

So what *is* the Latin word for “chocolate”?

Obviously, the Romans didn’t know anything about chocolate, since they had no access to any of the places cacao grew naturally. By the time Europe did learn of its existence, even ecclesiastical Latin ...
2 votes
1 answer
66 views

Looking for a translation of "end credits"

End credits are a namelist shown at the end of a video work. I am looking for an expression for it that is short enough for lyrics. I wonder if index finalis ("final list") is accurate and ...
0 votes
0 answers
134 views

Popcorn in latin

In Portuguese, popcorn is "Pipoca" from Old Tupi pi'poka pira(skin) pok(burst) Since latin has borrowed some words(not to mention greek) Could we have it as a borrowed word? Pipoca is a ...
5 votes
1 answer
278 views

What is the best translation for "livestreaming"?

I am looking for a brief and accurate expression to say "livestreaming" in Latin. Classical or New Latin style, or coined word are all okay. Are there any options?
2 votes
0 answers
62 views

I want to get a tattoo but I need help with translation. How would you say “for myself” in Latin? Would you say “pro/per ego/memet”?

I want to get a tattoo but I need help with translation. How would you say “for myself” in Latin? Would you say “pro/per ego/memet”?
12 votes
2 answers
3k views

Is *Moscovia* a latinists' invention?

Quoting this article on Grammatica Russica by Heinrich Wilhelm Ludolf: The Russian city of Novgorod (literally ‘new town’) becomes (in the ablative case) Novogorodio. Moscow is Moscovia, though it ...
2 votes
0 answers
108 views

Help with more neo-Latin: making sense of a Hebrew calque

Hello: I am back again with more neo-Latin from Lawrence of Brindisi. This time, it's his Latin rendering of Psalm 45:13-14 "tota gloriosa filia regis intrinsecus propter intertexturas, induta ...
23 votes
2 answers
4k views

Why did scientists abandon Latin in their publications?

Whereas the Latin language was used by almost every scientist until the 18th century, this is a fact that since then the use of Latin in scientific publication has fastly decreased: the best example ...
4 votes
1 answer
129 views

Use of the subjunctive in a quod-clause in Renaissance Latin

I am translating this sentence from Lawrence of Brindisi: "quod autem omni gratia plena fuerit Maria, Spiritus Sanctus, qui fons est totius gratiae, multis ostendit in Cantico Salominis. Primo ...
6 votes
0 answers
216 views

What does ut mean in this sentence

I'm struggling to find the right translation for 'ut' in the sentence below. For context, it's part of a property transaction in a Manorial Court Roll from circa 1700. Willelmus Taylor dedit Domino ...
5 votes
2 answers
371 views

What can be used as a Latin word for "Meltdown" (in the sense used for people with Autism)?

I have a lesser form of Autism (that generally doesn't really manifest much unless people actually live with me or in specific situations) and sometimes I can have a meltdown. I write a journal in ...
5 votes
1 answer
113 views

What is the meaning of praeprimis?

I came across the word "praeprimis" when reading some 17th century Latin (Experimenta nova, Otto von Guericke, b. 4 ch. 15 ). To my best guess, it's a combination of "praecipue" ...
5 votes
1 answer
107 views

Meaning of "pro temperiei diversitate" in Guericke's Experimenta Nova

Otto von Guericke, in Experimenta Nova (1672), is describing how a feather floats above a globe of sulphur. In this quote, I'm interested in the phrase "pro temperiei diversitate", which I ...
2 votes
1 answer
113 views

What were the typographical rules for the title pages of New Latin books?

Many New Latin book title pages look like the following: What are the rules or at least the habits followed for which part of the title is either italicized, capitalized, etc.? I guess it has ...
6 votes
1 answer
544 views

What does “per se praeclarissima videtur” mean when talking about a difficult problem?

I am translating De numeris primis valde magnis by Leonhard Euler and I am somewhat puzzled by the following phrase on the second page: “per se praeclarissima videtur”. Ac profecto natura numerorum ...
6 votes
1 answer
200 views

What does 'spatio pollicarir emotius' mean in Otto von Guericke's Experimenta Nova?

In Otto von Guericke's Experimenta Nova (1672) he says (in reference to experiments showing how a feather floats above and sometimes is reattracted to a globe of sulphur): Filum lineum, si acumini ...
2 votes
0 answers
83 views

What numbers (e.g. 0, -1, or 1.0) are plurals in Latin?

The basic question is: With which numbers should I use a plural form of the noun? Background: English In English it seems to me that the only singular number is 1 (and maybe -1), but everything else ...
4 votes
2 answers
161 views

Translating words in a Manorial Court Roll of 1699

The proceedings in Manorial Courts in England before 1733 were recorded in Latin. I'm currently transcribing and translating a set of such documents dated 1699 (to the best to my ability -- I last ...
5 votes
0 answers
75 views

Why "absolute" instead of "absolutam"?

There's a famous piece of mathematics by János Bolyai, originally published in Latin, under the title Scientiam Spatii Absolute Veram Exhibens: A Veritate Aut Falsitate Axiomatis XI Euclidei, A Priori ...
3 votes
0 answers
112 views

What is the modern day pronunciation of v in Latin as in van or as a w? And is the c soft as in cellar or hard as in cat?

What is the modern day pronunciation of v in Latin (as in van) or as a w sound? And is the c soft as in cellar or hard as in cat?
7 votes
2 answers
580 views

Help with two very simple but opaque gobbets of neo-Latin

I write again asking for help with two passages of Lawrence of Brindisi. Christus autem virga est divinae virtutis : [examples of biblical virgae]. Sed virga ista facta est diversorum colorum, albi ...