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Questions tagged [new-latin]

Questions regarding Latin in the modern era, approximately 1400–1900

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2answers
296 views

Need help translating a 16th century inscription

The following inscription is on a flagstone in the wall of Schloss Bühl, a 16th century chateau in southern Germany. It was built by David vom Stain ("David from the Stone"), who is named in the text. ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

Can “libella maris” be “sea level”?

I came across the expression libella maris in a scientific text from 19th century. There are many ways to parse it in the context, and one option that occurred to me is that maybe it stands for "sea ...
5
votes
2answers
115 views

Tantibus: genuine Latin word, or made-up?

I came across the word tantibus while reading this page (as part of a bigger word, amalgotantibus), where it's claimed to be Latin for "nightmare"; a little bit of digging also revealed that it's the ...
5
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1answer
84 views

“Blood for the Blood God” vs “Gloria In Excelsis Deo”

I play a scifi game where you build your own pieces and the language in the game is a derivative of Latin. I want to write a couple battle cries/prayers on the sides of one of my game pieces. The ...
11
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2answers
767 views

What is “parecbolae”?

Researching an answer for this question, I found a book of regulations of the University of Oxford, dating from the early 19th century. The title is: I cannot find the meaning of Parecbolae anywhere. ...
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0answers
25 views

Quippe+quod (Early Modern period)

Looking at other posts on quippe+relatives (particularly, at this link:1), there seems to be a consensus that it will usually show up with qui/... but not with quod, but I'm currently looking at a ...
6
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2answers
75 views

Quōmodo rēctē “derivative of f(x)” dīcere?

I am currently struggling to figure out how to translate the following phrase: [...] derivative of f(x) [...] I had a couple of initial ideas, namely: dēductīva [fūnctiō] dē f(x) dēductīva ...
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3answers
217 views

A phrase of L. Euler on functions

I'm trying to understand the following sentence from Leonhard Euler's Institutionum calculi integralis Vol. III Chap. 2, bottom of p.40: Huiusmodi functiones arbitrarias, prouti hic feci, eiusmodi ...
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2answers
1k views

Abbreviation “D. O. M.” on tombstones

To finish my Maltese question series before boarding a plane off the island, here is another question about Latin inscriptions in tombstones in St. John's co-cathedral at Valletta. In many tombs, ...
4
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1answer
65 views

Heic instead of hic in a Maltese tomb

Continuing my series of questions about Malta (locative vs. in and monumentum/monimentum), I would like to ask about an inscription I saw in St. John's co-cathedral in Valletta. The floor was tiled ...
2
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3answers
86 views

Monumentum spelled as monimentum

I saw a great number of Latin inscriptions in a cathedral on Malta, dating roughly between 1500 and 1800 CE. There were at least a couple of instances of the word monimentum, but saw no monumentum. Is ...
6
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1answer
69 views

What is an academic fellow?

What is the Latin word used for a fellow of a college or an academic society? In particular, are there attested uses somewhere to be found? I am looking for a translation of "fellow" which is or has ...
2
votes
2answers
48 views

Flags flying at half-mast

A well-known mathematician passed away recently, and I happened to be in the Trinity College on the day after. As any Cambridge college undoubtedly would, they mourned the loss of a fellow by flying ...
2
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1answer
50 views

“Implied Power”

I am looking for a way to say "Implied Power" in Latin. When I say "Implied Power" I mean to say "Implicit Political Authority." Here is an example to walk readers through what I am trying to get at: ...
8
votes
1answer
72 views

How do you say “imply” in Latin?

I need to know how to say the present, past and future tense of "imply" in Latin. I don't know much Latin, I just need the grammatically correct way to say: "Implied ______" For example, for "Implied ...
5
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1answer
113 views

Was “dominus” or similar used with a title?

If a person is addressed formally with a title, it seems to vary from language to language (and to some extent within a single language) whether a word like "Mr" or "Herr" (German) is used. In Finnish ...
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0answers
56 views

Does Latin offer a single word referring back to the preceding *two* names mentioned?

Background. The following is correct standard English: (0) He read the poems of Catullus, Juvenal, Horace, and Virgil. He intentionally memorized only poems of the latter two. The following uses ...
11
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4answers
3k views

How would you say “cafe” in Latin?

I would like to say, "I'm going to the cafe" in Latin, but the best I can come up with is "Eo ad cafe." What would be a good choice for "cafe"? I'm not sure if a similar concept existed in Ancient ...
5
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1answer
100 views

About Spinoza's Latin

As Spinoza wrote in post-Renaissance times, I would imagine that his Latin was inspired by that of the humanists, which in turn was inspired by that in which Cicero himself wrote. Is my logical ...
10
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1answer
152 views

Should motum be translated as emotions?

Calvin's commentary on Romans 1:18 (Latin, English translation by MacKenzie): Ira, ἀνθρωποπαθῶς, more Scripturae pro ultione Dei: quia Deus puniens, prae se fert (nostra opinione) irascentis faciem....
11
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1answer
118 views

What does Q.B.V.D. stand for on the title page of a dissertation?

I have seen Q.B.V.D. as the first line of titles pages of academic dissertations, like this one: https://books.google.nl/books?id=YmpZAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA3&lpg=PA3&dq=Q.B.V.D&source=bl&...
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2answers
109 views

What does the Latin abbreviation “Form.” stand for?

I came across a medal commemorating the coronation of Charles XV in 1860. The inscriptions on the medal are all in Latin. I am aware of a few latin abbreviations centered around the creators of medals ...
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0answers
64 views

Which one is better: “sunt aequivalentes” or “aequivalent”?

If I want to say that two things are equivalent in Latin, I can imagine two ways using essentially the same word: X et Y sunt aequivalentes. X et Y aequivalent. Googling for the first option (...
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2answers
142 views

Is filius necessarily a biological descendant?

I saw a Latin inscription in a church in Rome years ago, and there was an interesting feature. It mentioned a pope and his filius. We were a couple of Latinists and we agreed that so it said, but we ...
6
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5answers
582 views

The English Gentleman

Here is The English Gentleman as depicted by Richard Braithwait in 1630: This is a thirty-part question. Can you tell: (a) What are the Latin words in each box? (b) What do they literally mean? (c)...
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2answers
230 views

English “Master” vs. “Mister” translated in Latin

I'm writing a novel in which Latin-speaking students at Oxford in 1560's are talking. In English, they'd be referring respectfully to gentlemen who weren't noblemen as "master," and noblemen as "lord....
4
votes
1answer
113 views

Superscript/suffix “ti”

Gauss wrote in his Ph.D. dissertation: Si quis e. g. in art. 3, aliaque incognitarum tamquam cognita spectata, reliquas per hanc et coefficientes datos rationaliter exprimere tentat, facile ...
14
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2answers
561 views

Constructing Latin diminutives

In the course of trying to construct an accurate diminutive form of the word abdomen - which for the record is Latin in origin (in the form abdōmen), having been borrowed by English via Middle French -...
7
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0answers
149 views

On two types of S in a text from 1759

I ended up studying this poem last year: This is a congratulatory poem in a dissertation at the Academy of Turku from 1759. It is on page 4 of the full dissertation. I also published an English ...
7
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2answers
134 views

Why is perfect passive participle from 'enuntio' - 'enunciatus'?

In my dictionary enuntio is first conjugation verb, enuntio, avi, are Now in Spinoza there came up this word - 'enunciatum', which is said to be (source - Wictionary) coming from enuntio, as ...
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1answer
146 views

Translating Scientific Latin

For my high school English class, which is a translation "workshop," we're all expected to give class-long, individual sessions focusing around a translation we've performed from whatever language we ...
8
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1answer
134 views

What is the exact translation of 'solummodo'?

What is the exact meaning of 'solummodo'? I take it is an adverb, perhaps? Encountered this in new Latin, more precisely in Spinoza's Ethics. It is translated as 'only', but it is not in my dictionary,...
4
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1answer
96 views

Infinitive ' habere ' usage in this sentence

How to understand a meaning of the infinitive 'habere' here, is it here as a subject (The Infinitive as a Subject, Gildersleeve & Lodge, page 275)? Nam cum posse existere potentia sit, sequitur ...
6
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1answer
268 views

'…quo plus…, eo plus … ' translation?

Here is a really complicated sentence, I am trying to understand how to translate it: Nam cum posse existere potentia sit, sequitur quo plus realitatis alicujus rei naturæ competit eo plus virium a ...
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3answers
600 views

Phrase grammar, curae or curo

I have a phrase and I'm concerned with grammar. Which one would be more proper? et ego non curae or et ego non curo Phrase meaning would be "I don't care."
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1answer
222 views

What is the Nominative of 'uniuscuiusque'?

This is taken from Spinoza's Ethics: notandum est Iƒ veram uniuscujusque rei definitionem nihil involvere neque exprimere præter rei definitæ naturam. As I can see, it is Adjective in Genitive and ...
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2answers
2k views

Latin words for “engineer”

While I was reading La révolution industrielle au Moyen Âge (The Medieval Machine: The Industrial Revolution of the Middle Ages) by Jean Gimpel, I’ve read: In the old texts, James of Saint George ...
7
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1answer
283 views

'idem hercle esset' meaning?

What could be the meaning of hercle in this context? Si quis ergo diceret se claram et distinctam hoc est veram ideam substantiæ habere et nihilominus dubitare num talis substantia existat, idem ...
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2answers
414 views

“Non possunt dari” translation

Please could someone explain what I am missing here? In Spinoza's The Ethics, Proposition V is said: PROPOSITIO V: In rerum natura non possunt dari duæ aut plures substantiæ ejusdem naturæ sive ...
11
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1answer
69 views

Rupes Recta, The Straight Wall, Correct Translation

Rupes recta is the name given to a feature on the Moon. This feature is also known as the straight wall or straight cliff. Is rupes recta the correct Latin phrase for straight wall or straight cliff? ...
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1answer
380 views

Why did scientists abandon Latin in their publications?

Whereas the Latin language was used by almost every scientist until the 18th century, this is a fact that since then the use of Latin in scientific publication has fastly decreased: the best example ...
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1answer
214 views

Interpretation of circumflex in a poem from 1621

A poem from 1621 contains one ô and one â. The ô is the interjection ô and the â is in the relative pronoun quâ. No circumflexes are used elsewhere in the poem. Does the circumflex (or caret or ...
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1answer
113 views

Short vowels in lucubrando

I came across a poem from 1621 written in Sapphic stanza. It contains this line: pervigil Christi, lucubrando sudans To scan that, the third word must be lŭcŭbrandŏ. L&S ...
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0answers
60 views

Gender and number in medieval composite active perfect

I am not sure of correct terminology, but let me call the medieval perfect tenses like amatum habeo — as opposed to the classical amavi — the "composite active perfect". One would expect ...
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2answers
210 views

Help with Latin translation from a 17th century ecclesiastical Latin book

The book is Panoplia Clericalis, and the passage I'm having difficulty with (which I suspect is much easier than I think) is, from page 602: De colorum mixtione, qui differunt, ex varia eorum ...
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1answer
107 views

Latin names of Cambridge terms

The academic year at the University Cambridge consists of three terms: Michaelmas, Lent and Easter. For more details, consult the term date pages of the university. What are these terms called in ...
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1answer
192 views

Use of ß (“eszett”) in Latin text

I am translating a medical text from the late 16th century. The author is Swiss. The text uses the ß character (like the German eszett). Example: toti amplißimo conseßui Is this character being ...
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0answers
256 views

What are New Latin's comma rules?

What are New Latin's comma rules? Specifically, where do New Latin's comma rules differ from modern English's comma rules (e.g., as documented in the 16th ed. of the Chicago Manual of Style §§6.15-6....
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1answer
460 views

How to parse “semper eadem” grammatically?

The phrase semper eadem, "always the same", is a fairly popular motto. It is easy enough to interpret semantically, but I could not convince myself about the exact grammatical interpretation of the ...
7
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1answer
71 views

What does 'ad tantam mollem' refer to in this context?

This is from an explanation of the six Ptolemaic statements, the one that concludes that the world is round (terram esse rotundam). Terra tamen ob duritiem non potuit perfectam rotunditatem ...