Questions tagged [new-latin]

Questions regarding Latin in the modern era, approximately 1400–1900

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3
votes
1answer
157 views

“Gaza tamen aliquoties occiput vertit”

In a footnote of Vives' Dialogs (for the word "Ad brechma"): Ad Brechma, brechma, tis; sive bregma, pars anterior capitis, synciput a Breco Graeco, quod est pluo, et irrigo; haec enim pars ...
6
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2answers
114 views

Is there any new published book that is written in latin?

I wondered that is there any new book that is written in latin publishing now ? Like new latin books in 21st century. If so what is the difference of new published books from the literature of ...
7
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0answers
134 views

Can Veneti and Antuerpiae be vocatives?

I am puzzling over: caveat veneti et antuerpiae exemplo tiri et tu lundina This was written in the margin of a sixteenth-century commentary on Isaiah at chapter 23, which is on Tyre. My translation ...
6
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1answer
171 views

Euler passage translation (Latin in 18th century)

I would like to include a translation of a brief passage from Euler's music text Tentamen novae theoriae musicae (1739) in an article I am writing, but find the original somewhat tricky to work with. ...
2
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2answers
76 views

Why is Novarupta feminine?

Today is the anniversary of the Novarupta eruption, the largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century. Nova rupta is of course good Latin for "new broken thing", where the thing in question is ...
2
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1answer
87 views

19th century Latin textbooks?

What textbooks were used to teach Neo-Latin in primary, secondary, and higher education schools during the 19th century?
4
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2answers
199 views

What can be used as a Latin word for “Meltdown” (in the sense used for people with Autism)?

I have a lesser form of Autism (that generally doesn't really manifest much unless people actually live with me or in specific situations) and sometimes I can have a meltdown. I write a journal in ...
6
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1answer
80 views

Mountains and Mountain Ranges: Names

I have been recently enjoying Mark Walker's delightful translation of Professor Tolkien's masterpiece, The Hobbit (Hobbitus Ille). I was especially charmed by Tolkien's maps, translated into Latin (...
7
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1answer
137 views

Is there a New Latin word for Cyborg?

Good day! Originally cyborg came from English cybernatic organism. In Latin that would of course be organismus cyberneticus. Given the mouthful of that, it is no wonder that people tend to simply use ...
3
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3answers
137 views

Why is specifically “Latin America” called that when numerous other regions' languages are also based on the Latin language?

There's an entire major region, spanning the entire South America and parts of North America, called "Latin America". People there tend to speak Spanish and closely related languages. There's also the ...
9
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3answers
2k views

How do you say “online” and “offline” in Latin?

Good day! How would you go about saying the expression "online" or "offline" in Latin? Maybe something like Portuguese Conectado and Desconectado (connected and disconnected)? Couldn't find it ...
3
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1answer
86 views

Can I conclude something about pronunciation from I/J and U/V variation?

I reread the inscription in this question about the abbreviation D. O. M. dated to 1749: The variation between I and J caught my eye. It seems to me that: J is used in all consonantal positions. J ...
3
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1answer
279 views

Modification of my Scottish Clan Motto (luceo non uro)

I am in the process of planning out a tattoo, and I want to get my family's clan motto. The Mackenzie Clan motto is Luceo Non Uro Which as I understand translates to "shine not burn." That said, ...
3
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0answers
55 views

How to properly convey non-Latin words in a practical Latin text?

My question here is firmly in regards to contemporary Latin, in the sense of Latin to be used not as a dead language (in other words, I am not looking for a Nosoponian answer that invalidates anything ...
3
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1answer
83 views

How does one say lowlands in contemporary Latin?

How would one write the expression "lowlands" in contemporary Latin? Would it be like in Spanish, terra bassa, or would it be something like terra subiecta or even terra infera? I would prefer an ...
5
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1answer
489 views

Latinisation of a surname. Seeking advice from expert Latinists

I have a need to Latinise a surname (details about that name are provided further down in my question) rather urgently, but with my miniscule knowledge of Latin I cannot do that myself well. I hope ...
2
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0answers
59 views

Learning from scratch [duplicate]

I am interested in learning Latin. I have tried to find good resources to do this online but have found a great deal of noise. Does anyone have any good recommendations of how to properly learn Latin ...
6
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1answer
111 views

Formation of words like “essive” or “adessive”

In modern linguistic terminology there are grammatical cases named essive and adessive. However, from a Latinate point of view those formations look abnormal: Usually, the ending -ivus is attached to ...
10
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2answers
1k views

What is the superlative of ipse?

In later Latin, as ipse started to lose its force, Petronius uses ipsimus for emphasis: Tamen ad delicias ipsimi [domini] annos quattuordecim fui. Nec turpe est, quod dominus iubet. Ego tamen et ...
3
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1answer
441 views

Variation in the spelling of word-final M

I recently visited the museum of the main monastery of the Carthusian order near Grenoble. I saw this in an open book on display in a former chamber of a monk: What took me by surprise is the ...
4
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3answers
178 views

Is there a descriptive modern Latin grammar?

There is a lot of Latin grammars out there, but here I am looking for a specific kind: a descriptive modern Latin grammar. By modern Latin I mean the Latin of our own era. I would like it to be as ...
4
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1answer
68 views

Proper way to say “Traveler's Writ/Licence/Certificate”

I am looking for more or less the 'proper' (or any good approximation) way to translate a "Traveler's Writ," as in a certificate or license given to a traveler that allows him legal access to an area. ...
6
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2answers
777 views

How to say “Promethean”

My aim is to express "Promethean man" and "Epimethean man" (as in the brothers Prometheus and Epimetheus) in the style of "homo sapiens" and "homo erectus".
4
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2answers
397 views

Need help translating a 16th century inscription

The following inscription is on a flagstone in the wall of Schloss Bühl, a 16th century chateau in southern Germany. It was built by David vom Stain ("David from the Stone"), who is named in the text. ...
3
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1answer
96 views

Can “libella maris” be “sea level”?

I came across the expression libella maris in a scientific text from 19th century. There are many ways to parse it in the context, and one option that occurred to me is that maybe it stands for "sea ...
6
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2answers
907 views

Tantibus: genuine Latin word, or made-up?

I came across the word tantibus while reading this page (as part of a bigger word, amalgotantibus), where it's claimed to be Latin for "nightmare"; a little bit of digging also revealed that it's the ...
4
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2answers
677 views

“Blood for the Blood God” vs “Gloria In Excelsis Deo”

I play a scifi game where you build your own pieces and the language in the game is a derivative of Latin. I want to write a couple battle cries/prayers on the sides of one of my game pieces. The ...
11
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2answers
794 views

What is “parecbolae”?

Researching an answer for this question, I found a book of regulations of the University of Oxford, dating from the early 19th century. The title is: I cannot find the meaning of Parecbolae anywhere. ...
4
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2answers
101 views

Quippe+quod (Early Modern period)

Looking at other posts on quippe+relatives (particularly, at this link:1), there seems to be a consensus that it will usually show up with qui... but not with quod, but I'm currently looking at a ...
6
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2answers
88 views

Quōmodo rēctē “derivative of f(x)” dīcere?

I am currently struggling to figure out how to translate the following phrase: [...] derivative of f(x) [...] I had a couple of initial ideas, namely: dēductīva [fūnctiō] dē f(x) dēductīva ...
8
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3answers
278 views

A phrase of L. Euler on functions

I'm trying to understand the following sentence from Leonhard Euler's Institutionum calculi integralis Vol. III Chap. 2, bottom of p.40: Huiusmodi functiones arbitrarias, prouti hic feci, eiusmodi ...
5
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2answers
3k views

Abbreviation “D. O. M.” on tombstones

To finish my Maltese question series before boarding a plane off the island, here is another question about Latin inscriptions in tombstones in St. John's co-cathedral at Valletta. In many tombs, ...
4
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1answer
120 views

Heic instead of hic in a Maltese tomb

Continuing my series of questions about Malta (locative vs. in and monumentum/monimentum), I would like to ask about an inscription I saw in St. John's co-cathedral in Valletta. The floor was tiled ...
3
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3answers
145 views

Monumentum spelled as monimentum

I saw a great number of Latin inscriptions in a cathedral on Malta, dating roughly between 1500 and 1800 CE. There were at least a couple of instances of the word monimentum, but saw no monumentum. Is ...
6
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1answer
88 views

What is an academic fellow?

What is the Latin word used for a fellow of a college or an academic society? In particular, are there attested uses somewhere to be found? I am looking for a translation of "fellow" which is or has ...
2
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2answers
59 views

Flags flying at half-mast

A well-known mathematician passed away recently, and I happened to be in the Trinity College on the day after. As any Cambridge college undoubtedly would, they mourned the loss of a fellow by flying ...
2
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1answer
117 views

“Implied Power”

I am looking for a way to say "Implied Power" in Latin. When I say "Implied Power" I mean to say "Implicit Political Authority." Here is an example to walk readers through what I am trying to get at: ...
9
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1answer
97 views

How do you say “imply” in Latin?

I need to know how to say the present, past and future tense of "imply" in Latin. I don't know much Latin, I just need the grammatically correct way to say: "Implied ______" For example, for "Implied ...
7
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3answers
330 views

Was “dominus” or similar used with a title?

If a person is addressed formally with a title, it seems to vary from language to language (and to some extent within a single language) whether a word like "Mr" or "Herr" (German) is used. In Finnish ...
5
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0answers
75 views

Does Latin offer a single word referring back to the preceding *two* names mentioned?

Background. The following is correct standard English: (0) He read the poems of Catullus, Juvenal, Horace, and Virgil. He intentionally memorized only poems of the latter two. The following uses ...
12
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4answers
4k views

How would you say “cafe” in Latin?

I would like to say, "I'm going to the cafe" in Latin, but the best I can come up with is "Eo ad cafe." What would be a good choice for "cafe"? I'm not sure if a similar concept existed in Ancient ...
5
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1answer
189 views

About Spinoza's Latin

As Spinoza wrote in post-Renaissance times, I would imagine that his Latin was inspired by that of the humanists, which in turn was inspired by that in which Cicero himself wrote. Is my logical ...
10
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1answer
173 views

Should motum be translated as emotions?

Calvin's commentary on Romans 1:18 (Latin, English translation by MacKenzie): Ira, ἀνθρωποπαθῶς, more Scripturae pro ultione Dei: quia Deus puniens, prae se fert (nostra opinione) irascentis faciem. ...
11
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1answer
263 views

What does Q.B.V.D. stand for on the title page of a dissertation?

I have seen Q.B.V.D. as the first line of titles pages of academic dissertations, like this one: https://books.google.nl/books?id=YmpZAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA3&lpg=PA3&dq=Q.B.V.D&source=bl&...
8
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2answers
153 views

What does the Latin abbreviation “Form.” stand for?

I came across a medal commemorating the coronation of Charles XV in 1860. The inscriptions on the medal are all in Latin. I am aware of a few latin abbreviations centered around the creators of medals ...
4
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0answers
89 views

Which one is better: “sunt aequivalentes” or “aequivalent”?

If I want to say that two things are equivalent in Latin, I can imagine two ways using essentially the same word: X et Y sunt aequivalentes. X et Y aequivalent. Googling for the first option (...
7
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2answers
240 views

Is filius necessarily a biological descendant?

I saw a Latin inscription in a church in Rome years ago, and there was an interesting feature. It mentioned a pope and his filius. We were a couple of Latinists and we agreed that so it said, but we ...
6
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5answers
784 views

The English Gentleman

Here is The English Gentleman as depicted by Richard Braithwait in 1630: This is a thirty-part question. Can you tell: (a) What are the Latin words in each box? (b) What do they literally mean? (c)...
8
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2answers
486 views

English “Master” vs. “Mister” translated in Latin

I'm writing a novel in which Latin-speaking students at Oxford in 1560's are talking. In English, they'd be referring respectfully to gentlemen who weren't noblemen as "master," and noblemen as "lord....
4
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1answer
129 views

Superscript/suffix “ti”

Gauss wrote in his Ph.D. dissertation: Si quis e. g. in art. 3, aliaque incognitarum tamquam cognita spectata, reliquas per hanc et coefficientes datos rationaliter exprimere tentat, facile ...