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Questions tagged [negation]

For questions regarding negative statements, i.e. statements involving an opposite, denial or the likes.

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Can 'non' with gerundive mean both lack of obligation and negative obligation?

If a gerundive is used with non, can it mean both lack of obligation and negative obligation? For example, can non loquendum est mean both "it is not necessary to speak" and "it is necessary not to ...
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How do I say “this must not happen”?

I'm used to translating English auxiliary "must" with a Latin gerundive: hic necandus est "this man must be killed". But what if I want to say "this man must not be killed"? I would read non necandus ...
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What would this pun mean?

In a conversation with a fellow Ancient Greek enthusiast, the name "Medusa" (Μέδουσα, "ruling") came up. I made a rather tortured pun by switching the epsilon to an eta, creating μὴ δοῦσα. Now, μή is ...
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How can you tell whether prefixed ‘in-’ is the preposition ‘in’ or Indo-European ‘in-’?

Background The verb īnsum has the prefix in-. Prefixing in/in- to words, changes their meaning to ‘in’, ‘on’ et sim., or ‘un-’, ‘non’ et sim. (ɔ:¹ negation).² However, according to Wiktionary, the ...
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Expressing English modalities of advice in Latin

English has expresses advice in the present and past through the use of the following modal constructions: present: You should [...] present negated: You shouldn't [...] past: You should have [...] ...
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If arm is 'arma', why is unarmed 'inermis' and not 'inarmis'?

I came across the Spanish word 'inerme', which comes from Latin inermis and means unarmed. Since the Latin word for arm is 'arma' and the preffix 'in' indicates negation, it is clear that the form '...
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How do I negate an ut clause of result?

Ut clauses of result are excellent for saying "so ___ that". But what if I wanted to reverse this and say "not ___ enough to"? For example, tam strenue laborābam ut epistolās centum scripserim means "...
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Equivalent of “-less”

Given a Latin noun, how does one transform it into an adjective meaning "lacking [noun]" (the equivalent of English "-less")? I know that "having (a lot of) [noun]" would be formed with the ending "-...
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How to say “Double negation affirms by accident”?

I want to know how to say, "Double negation affirms by accident" or "Double negation affirms accidentally." Would it be duplex negatio affirmat per accidens? This is in reference to the idea from ...
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How to say “Don't even…”?

The following constructions feel simple enough: "You don't even move." — Ne moveris quidem. "Don't move!" — Noli moveri! or "Ne motus sis." But what if I want to give a negative ...
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What is the difference in meaning or nuance between 'premō' and 'imprimō' in the sense of 'I press'?

Wiktionary shows that both premō and imprimō can mean (among other things) "I press." Looking at the formation of the latter word, the prefix im-, can negate the root word. How this applies to this ...