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Questions tagged [names]

For questions about personal names (Ancient and Modern) in the Latin language.

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An adjective for Seneca

A particular passage in Cicero's works is a locus Ciceronianus, a work written in the style of Vergil is an opus Vergilianum etc. But which adjective should I use for Seneca? There exists apparently ...
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5 votes
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Was the name "Sasan/Sassan" often spelled with a double S in Latin or Greek?

A question on ELU (“Sassanian” vs. “Sasanian”) brought up the fact that the name of Sāsān has often been spelled in English with a double S in the middle: "Sassan". (The same goes for related words ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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What part of the name should be used to refer to someone?

When we want to talk about someone without giving their full name, in contexts where in English we would use the family name, what part of the name should we use? I'm confused since adjectives are ...
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How often were names ending in -um used in real life?

There seem to be a number of examples of personal names ending in -um in the works of Plautus (apparently, they also show up in Terence1). In a discussion on Wiktionary, I found an interesting comment ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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How were Greek patronymics stressed in Latin?

According to Wikipedia, the Scipios (as in Africanus) were known collectively as the Scīpiadae rather than the Scīpionēs. This was a rather poetic Greek way to say "sons of Scipio", as in the Atreïdae ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes
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Did Romulus and Remus have other names?

Throughout Classical times, Romans would often have several names: one person might be identified by praenomen, nomen gentilicum, cognomen, agnomen, signum, and patronymic, all together. Were Roman ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes
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Gender and etymology of name "Herena"

I found that Herena is the name of a Christian saint from the 3rd century. Virtually nothing is known about Herena's life, but my question is about the name: Is it a feminine name or masculine, or ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
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"Alēctō" or "Allēctō"?

"Alēctō" is the name of one of the Furies, made surprisingly famous in the Harry Potter books. It seems to come straightforwardly from Greek ă- "not" + lēg- "stop" + -tos "[adjective]", so "...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes
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Did the Romans give names to instances of natural disasters?

It is common to name storms. For example, a hurricane called Harvey is now over Texas. On the other hand, ancient people named deities related to various places and natural phenomena. There might be a ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
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Welsh/British names containing the root ARTO

I am looking for historic Latin-British names similar to "Arthur", like Artomaglus ("bear prince"). This example seems to me to be a Medieval translation by Geoffrey Monmouth .
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Latinizing the surname "De Vincenzo"

Hello how would someone Latinize this surname? De Vincenzo Any assistance would be appreciated. Thank you.
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