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Questions tagged [names]

For questions about personal names (Ancient and Modern) in the Latin language.

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19 votes
4 answers
584 views

Did the Romans derive verbs from names?

I know the Romans did derive verbs from nouns (laudare, finire, lucere…), but did they ever derive verbs from names? The Greeks did, for example forming homerizein (ὁμηρίζ&...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
210 views

How are "Arsaces" and "Gotarzes" declined, and why?

Declinatione nominum latinorum a nominibus graecis quae -ης finiuntur perturbor. Dictionarium L&S exhibet "Arsăces, is m." a nomine graeco Ἀρσάκης. (E in syllaba ultima de "Arsăces" longum esse ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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15 votes
1 answer
2k views

Why is Jesus inflected in such a way?

The name Iesus is declined in a very peculiar way in Latin, and no other word seems to follow similar declensions. Why is this so? Is there a way to put this broader declension in context to make some ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
9 votes
3 answers
3k views

The Names Amadeus, Amadeo, Amadei

Beloved Wikipedia says: Amadeus is a theophoric given name derived from the Latin words ama – the imperative of the word amare (to love) – and deus (god). As a linguistic compound in the form of a ...
Johan88's user avatar
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13 votes
2 answers
3k views

General principles for translating non-Latin names into Latin

I am engaged in several translation projects on the side which often involve translating names that do not have a Roman equivalent. Certain names obviously come from or have obvious equivalents in ...
brianpck's user avatar
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13 votes
1 answer
3k views

What declension is the name, Aeneas?

How would you decline this noun? It can not be 1st, 2nd, or 3rd declension. Also, how would you say "of Aeneas", which is genitive case?
Lucy A.'s user avatar
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9 votes
1 answer
259 views

Hexametric Greek names

A number of Greek names encountered in hexameter follow the syllable length pattern -vv-; consider for example Penelope, Telemachos, Calliope, Terpsichore. The pattern -v-- is absent as the metric ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
455 views

Inflections of Ζεύς

Διώνη is the name of a Titaness, a nymph, and Phoenician goddess. And according to the Wikipedia article on said Titaness, it's derived from the feminine form of the genitive of Ζεύς. And according to ...
MarqFJA87's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
787 views

Male personal names ending in -um

A number of personal names in the works of Plautus end in -um in the nominative singular, which struck me as odd when I first encountered them, since nominative singular -um is characteristically ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
129 views

How is the name "Penthesilea" formed?

The Homeric name Πενθεσίλεια seems to come from πένθος "grief" and λαός "people", presumably meaning something like "grieved by the people". This would be drawing a ...
Draconis's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
391 views

How were names ending in -ιον used in Greek?

In the plays of Plautus, there are some names ending in -um. They are generally formed as Greek names (whether genuine or pseudo-Greek), and the Latin ending -um here seems to correspond to the Greek ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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16 votes
2 answers
866 views

What is the vocative of Gnaeus?

I would like to know how to decline the name Gnaeus in vocative. I see three options: Gnaee (regular declension) Gnai (would make sense by analogy to Gai if the name is pronounced /gnaius/) Gnaeus (...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
10 votes
3 answers
5k views

Mother Earth in Latin - Personification

I'm looking for a Latin equivalent to the personification 'Mother Earth'. Does Matris Orbis or Mater Terram do the job? Do they translate in the same way?
DVCITIS's user avatar
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10 votes
2 answers
5k views

Is there a plural of Jesus in Latin?

The name Iesus has peculiar declension in Latin. The declension of this word in every source that I have seen only gives singular forms. However, I can imagine situations where a plural is needed: a ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
451 views

How did the Romans latinize foreign names (personal, place names)?

I am looking for references to linguistic work on latinization of foreign names by the Romans from the earliest days to the early centuries AD. As this is perhaps quite a wide topic, some field review ...
kkm mistrusts SE's user avatar
9 votes
3 answers
699 views

Which is the logic behind "Aloysius" Latinisation?

Wikipedia states that Aloysius is: ... a Latinisation of the names Louis, Lewis, Luis, Luigi, Ludwig, and other cognate names (traditionally in Medieval Latin as Ludovicus or Chlodovechus), ...
luchonacho's user avatar
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9 votes
2 answers
500 views

Etymology of Nausicaa?

There was an interesting question on Lit regarding a proposed meaning of Nausicaa as "burner of ships". Although I don't have an issue with the ναῦς/κάω hypothesis, I suspect κάω is more likely used ...
DukeZhou's user avatar
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9 votes
3 answers
2k views

What did the Greeks and Romans call their pets?

I know that some Greeks and Romans kept pet canēs, cattī, and even dracōnēs. My question now is: what did they name them? In other words, do we have attestations of how the ancients named their pets? ...
Draconis's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
956 views

What was Sappho's name?

I've seen the name of the famous Aeolian poet written as both "Ψαπφω" and "Σαπφω". The latter seems universal in Attic, and hence she's known as "Sappho" in English. Which of these names is "more ...
Draconis's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
6k views

What is the meaning of Satanas?

Satanas is a name I have encountered on several occasions, such as when hearing of a lost silent movie of this name by F. W. Murnau. What is the meaning of the as ending in Satanas?
Abdul Al Hazred's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
271 views

Someone of someplace

I'm wondering how someone would have said where they're from, sort of as a locational surname. To perhaps better explain, in English we might say, 'Hello, I'm Susan of London.' How would you say ...
Ali's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
135 views

Geraldus vs Giraudus

What would the Latin equivalent of Gerald (found also in French as Giraud, Géraud, etc.)? I found both Geraldus and Giraudus online.
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4 votes
1 answer
102 views

Which is correct? Eugenius or Eugenīus or both?

Checking the dictionary entries for Eugenius, I was surprised to find different vowel quantities depending on whether it was the adjective or the noun. As you can see from the screenshot above, ...
Canned Man's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
63 views

How were Greek patronymics stressed in Latin?

According to Wikipedia, the Scipios (as in Africanus) were known collectively as the Scīpiadae rather than the Scīpionēs. This was a rather poetic Greek way to say "sons of Scipio", as in the Atreïdae ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
387 views

How do you pronounce "Aeclepiadae"?

Just as the title says. Or should it really be "Asclepiadae", since it comes from "Asclepius"?
Guesty McGuestface's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
163 views

"Alēctō" or "Allēctō"?

"Alēctō" is the name of one of the Furies, made surprisingly famous in the Harry Potter books. It seems to come straightforwardly from Greek ă- "not" + lēg- "stop" + -tos "[adjective]", so "...
Draconis's user avatar
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