Questions tagged [motto]

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15
votes
4answers
4k views

What is “Winter is Coming” in Latin?

I'm an avid follower of the TV-show "Game of Thrones", and wonder what a Latin translation of the Stark's families motto — "Winter is Coming" — would be? It's used in the form of a ...
13
votes
3answers
566 views

A Dios rogando y con el mazo dando

tl;dr I want a Latin motto conveying the idea that you have to ask God for something while at the same time pursuing it. I have two Spanish sayings that work pretty well I have a couple of Latin ...
12
votes
2answers
9k views

Ars gratia artis

I would like to know the meaning of the following Latin expression, as well as a grammatical analysis of the individual words in this context: ARS GRATIA ARTIS as it appears in the following logo ...
11
votes
4answers
3k views

Request for a Latin phrase as motto “God is highest/supreme”

I'm looking for someone that can help me produce a correct, coherent Latin phrase for a school project to be used as a motto, similar to the Marine Corps motto Semper Fidelis, etc. I would like the ...
11
votes
2answers
897 views

Hogwarts Motto from J.K. Rowling's “Harry Potter” series

Hogwarts, the School of Witchcraft and Wizardry in the Harry Potter books, has the following Latin motto: Draco dormiens numquam titillandus. Most online sources translate this as "Never tickle a ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

Latin translation for “Remember calmness”

I have anger management issues, and am currently working on a tattoo I'd like to have done. So I'm thinking of a good Latin phrase which carries the same spirit as Memento Mori. What I'd like to have ...
10
votes
2answers
1k views

Translating “Father knows beer best” into Latin

I'm making a label for my dad's homebrew as a Christmas gift and I'd love to include "Father knows beer best" in Latin as the motto of his company. Could anybody help translate that for me?
10
votes
1answer
300 views

Tastes Like Chicken

What Latin I know I've sort-of assimilated from being fluent in Spanish and having some knowledge of French, as well as a life-long interest in English etymology (not a strong foundation for Latin, I ...
9
votes
2answers
2k views

Joke variant of US motto

As a joke, I'm imagining someone being confused about the US motto, and thinking it was "e unum pluribus", which hypothetically might mean "out of the one, many" or similar. But I bet that isn't ...
9
votes
2answers
743 views

Is it acceptable/regular to use diacritics (macron) in written texts?

I'm building the brand for a web development company, and I'm using Latin for the name and slogan. However, as I am not familiar with the language, I would like some help clarifying meanings to avoid ...
9
votes
2answers
219 views

Translating “destroy the bad” for a tattoo

I am considering a tattoo in Latin, and I want it to say "destroy the bad", or perhaps "get rid of the evil". I want the translation to be short due to space constraints. I looked online and I found ...
9
votes
1answer
3k views

Semper Veritas, Semper Veritatem, or something else?

I'm considering getting a tattoo with the phrase "Always Truth" or "Always the Truth" in Latin, but I'm not 100% how to translate it, because I don't really understand Latin noun declension. My first ...
8
votes
3answers
895 views

“Nil virtus generosa timet”

The phrase "NIL VIRTUS GENEROSA TIMET", sometimes also found as "Nihil virtus generosa timet", was, supposedly, the divise or motto of Bertrand du Guesclin, French knight during the Hundred Years' War....
8
votes
3answers
4k views

I make/create therefore I am

I'm trying to find the most valid translation for "I make, therefore I am". The closest I've seen is "ego creo ergo sum" But have also seen just "creo ergo sum". Also seen many places stating that "...
8
votes
3answers
277 views

Translating “dangerous together” for a ring

I would like to have the phrase "NN and NN — dangerous together" inscribed in a ring in Latin. Google Translate suggests periculosum simul and simul ancipitia, but I'm not sure if they make any ...
8
votes
1answer
163 views

Yet another question about translation… Four words

I am currently studying Latin (3rd year in high school); so I do have a mild understanding of the language. I would like to know whether this translation is correct, makes sense and sounds at least a ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

What does “enim et” mean?

A couple days ago, a friend sent me an excerpt from a new game, asking about a Latin phrase in it: Contra Diabolus enim et alii Daemones (In the game, this is the motto of a group of Catholic ...
7
votes
3answers
2k views

Velocitas eradico — “get rid of speed” or “with speed, eliminate”

The US Navy's railgun project's badge (see this YouTube video at timecode 00:14) has the motto "Velocitas Eradico" — I have no formal instruction in Latin, but my familiarity with Romance ...
7
votes
3answers
221 views

Translation of “May Change Nourish Me”

I'm just looking for an accurate translation before getting a tattoo. I don't trust Google Translate completely. "Let Change Guide Me" to is also a contender. Google says it's "Mutatio Et Enutries Me"...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

Does this Latin make sense?

I want to use a motto "always seize the future" as a company slogan. Does "capere semper in posterum" make sense? I got it from Google Translate and based on Spanish-English translations from that ...
7
votes
3answers
205 views

How would you translate “Not a second wasted”?

In the sense of "every second employed productively" as a motto, so brevity is important. It's a little tongue-in-cheek. I don't mean something like "every second between now and then is important". ...
7
votes
1answer
421 views

Is “scholaris opus, scholaris vox” a correct translation of “student work, student voice”?

Some students of mine are creating a school publication featuring student work, and the proposed subtitle of their publication is: Scholaris Opus, Scholaris Vox The intended meaning is "student ...
7
votes
1answer
248 views

Is “urgeo inurgor” a correct Latin phrase, meaning “to squeeze the unsqeezable”?

As a tongue-in-cheek joke, I'm trying to make a motto out of Russian phrase "впихнуть невпихуемое", which is literally translated as "to squeeze unsqueezable". 'Squeeze' being used in this context as ...
7
votes
1answer
517 views

God is Vengeful Translation Help

I'm looking at getting a Latin phrase/quote on my arm and I'd like to know if the translation I'm thinking about using is correct. I've pulled some translations from this website (Protected By God - ...
7
votes
1answer
803 views

Reservoir Dogs: “Let's go to work” in Latin

I'm a programmer and I regularly write small utility programs for friends and family. Since I like a joke, all those programs have help/about forms that describe the program as having been produced by ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Translation from the English Apex Predator?

I am doing a project for a logo that intends to use the Latin translation for the term "Apex Predator". From the various web sites if have visited it appears that "Apicem Rapax" is one possible ...
6
votes
2answers
380 views

“Every Branch Shares The Same Root” - having trouble translating “Shares”

I'm having trouble translating "every Branch Shares The Same Root" into Latin for a school emblem. so far I have "OMNE GENERE CONSOCIARE QUOD IDEM RADIX" also this is a bit long for a school emblem ...
6
votes
2answers
10k views

Motto of Sir Francis Drake

The motto of Sir Francis Drake is: Sic parvis magna It is usually translated as "Greatness from small beginnings", but what is the literal translation? Would be be something like "Thus from ...
6
votes
1answer
505 views

What is the correct meaning of “Disciplina sollerti fingitur ingenium”?

This is the motto inscription placed above the entrance to an old elementary school which was build in the year 1816. I presume it can mean something like: With great effort, the spirit is ...
6
votes
1answer
103 views

Latin translation for “Forwards, into a standardized world”

I'm currently doing a project for which I'd love to use some Latin phrases as mottos. One of these would be "Forwards, into a standardized world". Using some dictionaries and wild guesswork, the best ...
6
votes
1answer
156 views

“Promise nothing” motto for a coat of arms

I'm looking for a motto for a coat of arms which would be an impersonal sentence (as it should be in a coat of arms) and read something like "Never promise anything" or "Promise nothing". Right now I'...
6
votes
1answer
39 views

Translating “order of protection and conservation”

An author friend recently asked me for help with a Latin name: in his book, a group calls itself the "order of protection and conservation", but in Latin to be pretentious (altum videtur…). My ...
6
votes
2answers
92 views

Translating: “Know and understand this king. Be sure that you make yourself a disciple of Christ the ruling King.”

I am trying to write a motto and my knowledge of Latin is not very profound. I wish to state using Latin to the effect of, and using king rather than man: Know and understand this king. Be sure ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Latin translation of ‘Strength, love and light’

I know people tend to advise against having tattoos in other languages but I have given it a lot of thought and definitely want it doing. I am hoping to have a tattoo that translates into ‘strength (...
5
votes
3answers
5k views

Translation of “Love makes it grow” in Latin for my tattoo

Thank you very much for all your replies. However the answers do not exactly match the meaning. "Love makes [anything] grow." — This anything can be anything — a person, work, condition, ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Latin Translation for “Death to the enemies of mankind”

I'd like to translate "Death to the enemies of mankind" into Latin. How can I do that? If there are multiple ways of saying it, I would like it structured as close to a motto as possible, since that's ...
5
votes
4answers
23k views

What is the Latin equivalent of “Ever Forward” as a motto?

In the workplace environment, I don’t think it is productive to dwell on what happened or keep score on who did what to whom. In English I would summarize my motto as: Ever Forward Now I am ...
5
votes
3answers
154 views

Does Tolle fidem, culpam dare convey the correct meaning?

I've looked up the translation of "Take Credit, Assign Blame" (a pseudo-motto for managers) and I got 'Sume fidem, culpam dare', and then later I found 'Tolle fidem, culpam dare'. Does this faux-...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

What is the preferred translation of “A leader serves” into Latin?

Dux servit? Dux ministrat? Something else? I would like to use this as a motto for a club. I am using leader in the sense of "Someone in a leadership position serves" or "One of the characteristics ...
5
votes
3answers
183 views

Fake family motto from English to Latin

Apologies, but could anyone translate the following to Latin, in the style of a family motto? "God loves those whom the fiend pursues" I tried Google translate, but, judging by the reverse ...
5
votes
3answers
219 views

“Semper” in the beginning of a sentence

This is my first attempt at a translation for a motto. My intent is to convey "Always be good" as an advice. I think it is "Semper bonus esto". A quick digression on the motto I'm ...
5
votes
4answers
190 views

“Over promise under perform” motto

As this is the time when we're all coming up with wacky mottos, I thought I'd try my hand at our department's private motto. Having run a few variants through Google Translate, and coming out with a ...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

“Per aspera ad astra” or “Ad astra per aspera”?

The title sums it up, but I think this could be a tricky question. I first stumbled upon this expression through a song by the German band Haggard, called "Per Aspera ad Astra" (from an album inspired ...
5
votes
1answer
221 views

Translation: Out of my death, new life

I took a Latin course a few years ago, and now I'm trying my hand for a friend's tattoo. Is my translation of the title correct? English: Out of my death, new life. Latin attempt: Ex mei mortis ...
5
votes
1answer
159 views

Excelsior aude?

I came across the phrase "excelsior aude" which seems to translate to courageously onward and upward? Is this accurate and would be it better reversed to aude excelsior or excelsior aude? Any thoughts?...
5
votes
2answers
253 views

Translating “do the next thing” to Latin

I would like to use the phrase "do the next thing" as a motto for some literature. Does the translation FACITE DEINDE REM work? The thought is basically this: we should get active with the next thing ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

What’s the difference between meminisse and memini?

I’d love to get a tattoo saying ‘remember’ in Latin, but would rather not use memento. Would it be possible to either use meminisse or memini? I’d like remember to be like a reminder for myself to ...
5
votes
1answer
142 views

Three (very similar) mottoes and a general grammar question

Hope you guys don't mind helping me. I'm looking to translate three mottoes into Latin, and I think these are beyond my capability to naturally translate: Do not be too kind; do not be too angry; ...
5
votes
1answer
532 views

Translation and context of 'faciam ut potero'

What is the most accurate translation to English of this expression FACIAM UT POTERO I think this appears in some Ovidius's poem and is a motto of an school of lawyers in Spain.
5
votes
1answer
61 views

Ex Occulto Unitas — is that the correct syntax for a motto?

I have little knowledge of Latin grammar — and few resources in Japan. I am attempting to create a fictional agency in a novel and its accompanying motto: From Secrecy, Unity. My attempted ...