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Questions tagged [motto]

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13 votes
3 answers
996 views

A Dios rogando y con el mazo dando

tl;dr I want a Latin motto conveying the idea that you have to ask God for something while at the same time pursuing it. I have two Spanish sayings that work pretty well I have a couple of Latin ...
Rafael's user avatar
  • 11.5k
11 votes
2 answers
2k views

Joke variant of US motto

As a joke, I'm imagining someone being confused about the US motto, and thinking it was "e unum pluribus", which hypothetically might mean "out of the one, many" or similar. But I bet that isn't ...
Loren Rosen's user avatar
9 votes
3 answers
6k views

I make/create therefore I am

I'm trying to find the most valid translation for "I make, therefore I am". The closest I've seen is "ego creo ergo sum" But have also seen just "creo ergo sum". Also seen many places stating that "...
Adam Haile's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
3k views

Does this Latin make sense?

I want to use a motto "always seize the future" as a company slogan. Does "capere semper in posterum" make sense? I got it from Google Translate and based on Spanish-English translations from that ...
Wayneio's user avatar
  • 173
6 votes
1 answer
3k views

What’s the difference between meminisse and memini?

I’d love to get a tattoo saying ‘remember’ in Latin, but would rather not use memento. Would it be possible to either use meminisse or memini? I’d like remember to be like a reminder for myself to ...
Sylvia's user avatar
  • 141
3 votes
2 answers
3k views

How to say "Born to Heal" in Latin?

I'm planning a motto for a medical squad: "Born to Heal". I want to know it's Latin translation. Google says its "Sana natus est", but there is no way to verify that, without an expert's help.
Kalle H. Väravas's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
322 views

"No virtue in being a humankind" into Latin

For a cartoon project about a veterinary office, I need to translate below phrase into Latin. The shorter, better as it’s going to be the slogan/motto. "No virtue in being a humankind." It literally ...
AL Y.'s user avatar
  • 31
1 vote
3 answers
337 views

“We are triumphant while our enemy sleeps” in Latin

Salvete! How would one say, “We are triumphant while our enemy sleeps.”? Gratias vobis ago!
SELDOM SCENE's user avatar
16 votes
4 answers
6k views

What is "Winter is Coming" in Latin?

I'm an avid follower of the TV-show "Game of Thrones", and wonder what a Latin translation of the Stark's families motto — "Winter is Coming" — would be? It's used in the form of a ...
Baard Kopperud's user avatar
14 votes
2 answers
17k views

Ars gratia artis

I would like to know the meaning of the following Latin expression, as well as a grammatical analysis of the individual words in this context: ARS GRATIA ARTIS as it appears in the following logo ...
Jack Maddington's user avatar
12 votes
2 answers
2k views

Hogwarts Motto from J.K. Rowling's "Harry Potter" series

Hogwarts, the School of Witchcraft and Wizardry in the Harry Potter books, has the following Latin motto: Draco dormiens numquam titillandus. Most online sources translate this as "Never tickle a ...
Sapphira's user avatar
  • 2,103
9 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is it acceptable/regular to use diacritics (macron) in written texts?

I'm building the brand for a web development company, and I'm using Latin for the name and slogan. However, as I am not familiar with the language, I would like some help clarifying meanings to avoid ...
GregKos's user avatar
  • 235
8 votes
3 answers
1k views

"Nil virtus generosa timet"

The phrase "NIL VIRTUS GENEROSA TIMET", sometimes also found as "Nihil virtus generosa timet", was, supposedly, the divise or motto of Bertrand du Guesclin, French knight during the Hundred Years' War....
Rodia's user avatar
  • 405
7 votes
1 answer
1k views

Reservoir Dogs: "Let's go to work" in Latin

I'm a programmer and I regularly write small utility programs for friends and family. Since I like a joke, all those programs have help/about forms that describe the program as having been produced by ...
Spratty's user avatar
  • 173
6 votes
1 answer
2k views

What would be the correct translation for "Out of few, many"?

I'm looking for a modification of the famous slogan E pluribus unum which translates to Out of many, one and is the traditional motto of the United States. Instead I want to say Out of few, many. What ...
mcExchange's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
600 views

How to say “Go all the way” in Latin?

I want to know how I can say Go all the way in Latin. What I found is Ut omni modo. Is it correct? I’ll use it to say something like: Go all the way what ever this will cost you, when we are talking ...
Sven's user avatar
  • 51
5 votes
3 answers
346 views

Fake family motto from English to Latin

Apologies, but could anyone translate the following to Latin, in the style of a family motto? "God loves those whom the fiend pursues" I tried Google translate, but, judging by the reverse ...
Tom Melly's user avatar
  • 153
5 votes
1 answer
1k views

Translation: Out of my death, new life

I took a Latin course a few years ago, and now I'm trying my hand for a friend's tattoo. Is my translation of the title correct? English: Out of my death, new life. Latin attempt: Ex mei mortis ...
Alexander Skage's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
2k views

Latin Translation for "Death to the enemies of mankind"

I'd like to translate "Death to the enemies of mankind" into Latin. How can I do that? If there are multiple ways of saying it, I would like it structured as close to a motto as possible, since that's ...
Budhaditya Ghosh's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
324 views

"Malo" in Motto Maelstrom

The motto for Concordia University Saint Paul (MN) reads: "In litteris proficere volo, malo diligere Jesum." The CSP website, magazine (Spring 2009), and various internet sources offer these ...
Verbiwhore's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
448 views

Seeking simple Latin translation for motto "fire, flow, transcendence"

I am in a community of flow artists and fire performers. I'm putting together a "coat of arms" of sorts for this community, and would like to include a motto in Latin. The motto in English would be ...
Matt Storer's user avatar
4 votes
4 answers
42k views

What is the Latin equivalent of “Ever Forward” as a motto?

In the workplace environment, I don’t think it is productive to dwell on what happened or keep score on who did what to whom. In English I would summarize my motto as: Ever Forward Now I am ...
Tony Ennis's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
742 views

"If you can breath, you can stand. If you can stand, you can fight."

I'm trying to help my sister. She heard this phrase that she like to have tattooed but she wanted it to be in Latin. Now I haven't been practicing for a few years so I could use with some help. The ...
Anna Consony's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
462 views

Translation of ‘I am, therefore I thank’

Please could you help me to create a Latin motto which means ‘I am, therefore I thank.’ I’ve thought of sum ergo laudo, but perhaps laudo is closer to ‘I praise’. I’m looking for a word with a nuance ...
Christopher's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
1k views

"Contra felicem vix deus vires habet" - Need advice on replacing the word "Felicem"

For context, this is for a tattoo I'd like to get but I want to make sure it's syntactically correct as best as possible. I think the phrase is a great one, however I would very much prefer it to be ...
Faz's user avatar
  • 41
2 votes
2 answers
195 views

Frightened but not surprised

For purposes of a motto, what is the grammatically correct way of saying "Frightened but not surprised" in Latin? Best effort so far is "Petrificata sed non sorpresa". What are ...
DVCITIS's user avatar
  • 609
2 votes
2 answers
753 views

"Luck is for the unprepared"

"Luck is for the unprepared" is my personal motto. I have tried to translate it but I'm not confident that it has not been translated as "Luck is a gift to the unprepared", whereas I am looking for a ...
stevemarvell's user avatar