Questions tagged [motto]

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8
votes
2answers
702 views

How do you say “under an angel's wing” in Latin?

How do you say "under an angel's wing" in Latin? Should it be sub ala angelus or sub ala angeli? A friend of mine has a tattoo (using the 1st option), and she's afraid it's not correct.
10
votes
3answers
945 views

Is “mens semita tua” the correct translation for “mind your path”?

I love the phrase mind your path and thought it’d be even cooler in Latin. The translation I have is: Mens Semita Tua Is this correct; like, good enough to tattoo? To add context, I feel that a lot ...
4
votes
1answer
66 views

Motto request: “Forgiveness, not permission”

Anyone who's ever worked on a project where Kafka-esque bureaucracy/red tape threatens to derail progress before one's even begun will be familiar with the following phrase... "It is better to ...
4
votes
1answer
104 views

Seize your future

What would "Seize your future/the future" be in Latin? I've got Carpe futurum, but my latin is quite poor. I want to use it as a motto for an educational company. I want to use it as it ...
6
votes
1answer
169 views

Translation of “auxilium nullum secundum”

I have tried to translate "auxilium nullum secundum" to English through Google but it doesn't appear to capture the true meaning. This is an organizational motto on a patch (military patch) ...
4
votes
2answers
125 views

How to say “Go all the way” in Latin?

I want to know how I can say Go all the way in Latin. What I found is Ut omni modo. Is it correct? I’ll use it to say something like: Go all the way what ever this will cost you, when we are talking ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Is “transfigurā penitus” the proper conjugation of the verb “transfiguro” in the context of a motto to mean “change internally”?

I am trying to describe the internal change which takes place as a person gets older or goes through a spiritual process. transfiguro and penitus are the best words I can find, transfigurā penitus is ...
3
votes
1answer
57 views

Tam quam magnum mundum est is grammatically correct?

I translated the sentence “ Tam quam magnum mundum est” from the Italian sentences “tanto quanto è grande il mondo” (as big ad the world is, in English) I wanted to know if the Latin sentence was ...
2
votes
2answers
143 views

I'm trying to translate or verify a quote from Terry Pratchett: “Ab Hoc Possum Videre Domum Tuum - I Can See Your House From Here”

The What and a bit of Why, in short: I'm trying to translate the phrase "I can see your house from (up) here" to use it as a motto for a "Lodge"/"Order" I'm a member of, ...
1
vote
1answer
477 views

Translation of US Army motto “This We'll Defend”

I am looking for a good translation of the US army motto, which is: This We'll Defend There are three variants of translation I have found: 1 Haec protegimus 2 Is nos mos vallo 3 Hoc defendam ...
2
votes
1answer
278 views

How to translate a variant of 'Per aspera ad astra'

How would you translate 'through the will of man to the stars' or 'through the indomitable human spirit to the stars'(more accurately, the latter)? Of course, I'm not looking for a literal translation,...
5
votes
1answer
211 views

Is “Nihil Labore Difficile” good grammar?

The slogan adopted by my old school had adopted was the Latin phrase nihil labore difficile. They claimed that it meant that "nothing is difficult with hard work". However, is this slogan ...
5
votes
1answer
171 views

Creating a Latin motto

I want to craft a Latin motto for a literary work. This motto would mean "I seek peace, I make war by duty". I thought about this: "Pacem adfecto, officiosus bellum gero". I have ...
2
votes
1answer
986 views

Space Force Motto: Semper supera or semper supra?

This came up recently and as far as I understand it, supera is correct, not supra. Partly because supera has the dual meaning of above (preposition) and space, or celestial (neutral noun). Supra on ...
4
votes
2answers
325 views

What is the latin phrase for knowing a mistake and doing it anyway

I am trying to remember a Latin quote that says something like I know I am wrong but I do it anyway. I remember reading it in a book. It's not much to go on, but if someone knows it, it will be nice ...
2
votes
2answers
435 views

How do I say, “In pursuit of Truth, Beauty, and Goodness”?

I know "Truth, Beauty, Goodness" is "Veritas, Bonitas, Pulcritudo." But do I need an "et" before "Pulcritudo"? When do you use and's in Latin? And how would ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Latin Translation for “Death to the enemies of mankind”

I'd like to translate "Death to the enemies of mankind" into Latin. How can I do that? If there are multiple ways of saying it, I would like it structured as close to a motto as possible, since that's ...
3
votes
1answer
701 views

Modification of my Scottish Clan Motto (luceo non uro)

I am in the process of planning out a tattoo, and I want to get my family's clan motto. The Mackenzie Clan motto is Luceo Non Uro Which as I understand translates to "shine not burn." That said, ...
4
votes
2answers
164 views

Motto — All Debts Will be Paid

Looking for use of this in a motto, like below a family coat of arms. No matter what, we will pay our debts to those we owe. Thanks!
1
vote
0answers
44 views

Translate into Latin: “To will the impossible” and “with will and sacrifice”

Hello and thank you in advance. Two phrases I am interested being in Latin: "To will the impossible" and "With will and sacrifice" First one being similar to "If there is a will, there's a way." ...
2
votes
2answers
307 views

“Thus is the Way of God”

In order to write "Thus is the Way of God" in Latin I have penned, SIC DEUS ITER Is it grammatically correct?
1
vote
2answers
136 views

Would this make sense?

So soon I'm getting a tattoo to say live without regret. I've pottered around on the internet a bit and found Sine Paenitentia Vive / Vive sine Paenitentia for this. I assume this is correct. I also ...
0
votes
1answer
83 views

Translation for “Mortal willpower” (Tattoo idea!)

Or anything to a similar effect! I was also considering something along the lines of Strength beyond Gods or Willpower beyond Gods/Willpower that transcends the gods But, the original title phrase ...
3
votes
1answer
88 views

Latin for “vexatious Litigant”

My days of decent knowledge of Latin are a little in the past since I passed my Latinum, and I am trying to get a good translation for what modern US courts call "vexatious litigant" into ...
2
votes
3answers
141 views

Only By Giving in Latin

How do I write "Only by Giving" in Latin, trying to nurture a 'Spirit of Giving', for example, "Only by Giving can we fulfill the purpose of life." What would be the best option? Would it be, SOLUM ...
5
votes
3answers
225 views

Fake family motto from English to Latin

Apologies, but could anyone translate the following to Latin, in the style of a family motto? "God loves those whom the fiend pursues" I tried Google translate, but, judging by the reverse ...
1
vote
0answers
157 views

Translating “win against all odds”

Does the phrase "non obstante omnes, vinco" have a coherent meaning? I wanted it to mean something like "in spite it all (or) against all odds, win/conquer!". I want to get this phrase engraved in ...
1
vote
1answer
156 views

How would I translate “Lead the way” or “Pathfinder”, “Leadership”

This is for a tattoo, so I want the meaning to be accurate. My friend who passed was an Aiborne Ranger and they had the motto of "Lead the Way" as they were the first into battle. It will be next to "...
2
votes
2answers
514 views

“Contra felicem vix deus vires habet” - Need advice on replacing the word “Felicem”

For context, this is for a tattoo I'd like to get but I want to make sure it's syntactically correct as best as possible. I think the phrase is a great one, however I would very much prefer it to be ...
5
votes
2answers
740 views

Origin of Auspicium Melioris Aevi

Auspicium Melioris Aevi, commonly translated to “Augur/Omen/Hope of a Better Age” serves as the motto of the Order of Saint Michael and Saint George. Does it have any ancient origin? Or is it's ...
5
votes
3answers
5k views

Translation of “Love makes it grow” in Latin for my tattoo

Thank you very much for all your replies. However the answers do not exactly match the meaning. "Love makes [anything] grow." — This anything can be anything — a person, work, condition, ...
2
votes
4answers
197 views

“No virtue in being a humankind” into Latin

For a cartoon project about a veterinary office, I need to translate below phrase into Latin. The shorter, better as it’s going to be the slogan/motto. "No virtue in being a humankind." It literally ...
3
votes
1answer
379 views

“If you can breath, you can stand. If you can stand, you can fight.”

I'm trying to help my sister. She heard this phrase that she like to have tattooed but she wanted it to be in Latin. Now I haven't been practicing for a few years so I could use with some help. The ...
3
votes
2answers
119 views

Latin words over this door?

We took our son to college and this was written over one of the doors on campus. I cannot figure out what it means! Can anyone here help? I assume it is Latin, but...
12
votes
4answers
4k views

Request for a Latin phrase as motto “God is highest/supreme”

I'm looking for someone that can help me produce a correct, coherent Latin phrase for a school project to be used as a motto, similar to the Marine Corps motto Semper Fidelis, etc. I would like the ...
1
vote
3answers
201 views

“We are triumphant while our enemy sleeps” in Latin

Salvete! How would one say, “We are triumphant while our enemy sleeps.”? Gratias vobis ago!
5
votes
2answers
7k views

“Per aspera ad astra” or “Ad astra per aspera”?

The title sums it up, but I think this could be a tricky question. I first stumbled upon this expression through a song by the German band Haggard, called "Per Aspera ad Astra" (from an album inspired ...
2
votes
2answers
333 views

“Luck is for the unprepared”

"Luck is for the unprepared" is my personal motto. I have tried to translate it but I'm not confident that it has not been translated as "Luck is a gift to the unprepared", whereas I am looking for a ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

“Never/do not forget, always remember” in Latin

I've looked around some forums and the translation I've got so far is: Ne Obliviscaris, Semper Commemoras I'm still not sure if this is correct. The context of the phrase that I wish to get the ...
1
vote
3answers
343 views

Translate “Strong by Choice”?

I would like to translate "Strong by Choice" to Latin as a motto for a charity. We have tried per arbitrium fortis but want to know if this can be improved.
7
votes
2answers
3k views

What does “enim et” mean?

A couple days ago, a friend sent me an excerpt from a new game, asking about a Latin phrase in it: Contra Diabolus enim et alii Daemones (In the game, this is the motto of a group of Catholic ...
4
votes
4answers
244 views

How to correctly translate phrase “knowledge builds upon knowledge”?

I would like to translate "knowledge builds upon knowledge" into Latin. Google Translate is obviously not good as it gives very different words depending on the structure of the English version, so I ...
3
votes
1answer
502 views

Translate “Quiet your mind”

I want a proper translation for the English sentence: "Quiet your mind" and also "Quiet yourself" I mean this in the sense of calming your mind and yourself. I want this to be translated as a ...
3
votes
2answers
397 views

Trying to translate 'Blood promises glory'

I'm trying to translate 'blood promises glory' into Latin. Google translate provided me with Sanguinis Promissa Gloria and I like it, sounds good, but I really want to run it past someone who actually ...
4
votes
1answer
3k views

Phrasing “I am enough” in Latin

Can someone help me distinguish between "ego satis" vs "sum satis" vs "Ego satis superque sum"? I want to say "I am enough" as in "good enough as a person".
2
votes
2answers
207 views

What does “Pulchre vive, vehementer somina, ardenter ama” mean?

I am getting a Latin tattoo so want to ensure that the Latin phrase is accurate before I get it inked! The Latin phrase is: Pulchre vive, vehementer somina, ardenter ama. Apparently, this means "...
3
votes
2answers
224 views

Translation of ‘I am, therefore I thank’

Please could you help me to create a Latin motto which means ‘I am, therefore I thank.’ I’ve thought of sum ergo laudo, but perhaps laudo is closer to ‘I praise’. I’m looking for a word with a nuance ...
3
votes
2answers
143 views

Translation of “It's not my job, I'm not paid to do that.”

I want to translate: "It's not my job, I'm not paid to do that." From English into Latin. (I work somewhere where I hear the phrase every day and I'm going to have a mug printed.) Automatic ...
5
votes
3answers
362 views

“Semper” in the beginning of a sentence

This is my first attempt at a translation for a motto. My intent is to convey "Always be good" as an advice. I think it is "Semper bonus esto". A quick digression on the motto I'm ...
2
votes
1answer
283 views

How to translate “from nothing to existence” preferably keeping ambiguity

What's a possible Latin motto meaning roughly "from nothing to existence/reality/something"? I'd like it to be ambiguous if possible, preferably implying "(something) comes into being from nothing" ...