Questions tagged [medieval-latin]

Questions regarding the Latin of the Medieval period, approximately 500–1400

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6
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0answers
78 views

What was the use and frequency of use of Latin "mactāre"?

In What are the key differences between the main Latin verbs meaning "to kill"? we saw a lot of verbs meaning "to kill" and the differences between them. The fun part of it is that ...
5
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1answer
104 views

Why is the Chapel in the Tower of London St Peter AD Vincula, not St Peter in Vinculis?

Why is the Chapel in the Tower of London "St Peter ad Vincula" and not "St Peter in Vinculis"
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315 views

If we say worship is only for God which latin word should we use for worship?

Latria is defined as that worship which is due only to God, unlike other forms of veneration (such as to the Virgin Mary or Saints) which is called Dulia and Hyperdulia. All three, I think, are forms ...
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3answers
348 views

What does "angelorum planta agmini" mean?

I at least partially understand all the invocations in Litaniae in omni tribulatione, but one stays mysterious: "Angelórum planta ágmini" It's quite Google-proof, a quoted search for it returned only ...
6
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270 views

How old is Ecclesiastical Latin Pronunciation?

Salvete, I have trying to research how old the Ecclesiastical Pronunciation of Latin is. To be more precise, I mean the Italianate pronunciation, called 'La Pronuncia Scolastica' in Italian. Many ...
6
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1answer
211 views

Mountains and Mountain Ranges: Names

I have been recently enjoying Mark Walker's delightful translation of Professor Tolkien's masterpiece, The Hobbit (Hobbitus Ille). I was especially charmed by Tolkien's maps, translated into Latin (...
3
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1answer
209 views

Why does Ecclesiastical Latin pronounce "au" as written?

Salvete, Ecclesiastical Latin, by which I mean here the Italian Traditional Pronunciation seems to have preserved some characteristics of rustic Roman pronunciation despite the spelling remaining ...
4
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1answer
80 views

Non obstante eo

What is the translation of "non obstante eo" in the context of this sentence? Also, is the rest of my translation accurate? This is the original text: De Gentilibus dicitur passim, quod rejectis ...
8
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2answers
366 views

Deciphering Latin words from a very old book (printed in 1544)

I'm trying to decipher the text in a paragraph from an old Latin book (De facultatibus partium animalium, Basileae, 1544) and it's very difficult. This is my result of the first line and I would like ...
3
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1answer
78 views

Pronunciation of ngi in Italianate Pronunciation

Salvete, Does anyone know how people schooled in the Italian style of pronunciation would pronounce diphthongi, the plural of diphthongus? I have seen some examples of books printed circa 1700 where ...
4
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1answer
70 views

ad sextam in tertiis et totis duplicibus

This is a rubric (instruction) for when to sing a hymn. I translated it as "At Sext on third and all doubles." This doesn't seem right to me because the 'third' is redundant. I would like to know ...
4
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1answer
114 views

Item versi in laude Christi editi a juvenco presbytero. can[untur] quando reversi fuerint et appropinquant regias ecclesie (sic)

This is a rubric for the hymn Gloria, laus, et honor from an 11th century manuscript. I've asked several people for help on it. Some said it is partly in Italian. I'm not sure why the (sic) is ...
3
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1answer
101 views

Dative/Ablative Substantive Translation?

Is this translation accurate? Qui viam dicit qua ad illam perveniri non tantum potest sed et debet, dicit id quod optimo et optatissimo in vita proximum est. Qui hanc viam ignorat, caetera omnia ...
9
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1answer
203 views

Which ancient Latin works survived into the Middle Ages or later but are now lost?

While reading Saint Aldhelm's 'Riddles' I saw a reference to Lucan's Orpheus, a Latin poem written in the first century AD. The seventh century writer Aldhelm had a copy of Orpheus, but it is now lost ...
2
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1answer
87 views

Instructional book for the Medieval philosophy student

I'm seeking for a book which contains several fragments of the medieval philosophical works, literally translates them and explains the obscure points for who wants to improve his Latin.
15
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2answers
311 views

Can there be double diminutives in Latin?

I've been reading some Latin of the 17th and 18th centuries and am wondering if it is possible for there to be "double diminutives." As I understand it, the word "cerebellum" (Oxford Latin = "brain") ...
6
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1answer
131 views

finding a Latin quote

I am reading the book "6/5" by Alexandre Laumonier, in French about high-frequency trading in electronic financial markets (bear with me). Near the end of "5", he says Pour autant, comme l'écrivit ...
6
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1answer
2k views

Latinisation of a surname. Seeking advice from expert Latinists

I have a need to Latinise a surname (details about that name are provided further down in my question) rather urgently, but with my miniscule knowledge of Latin I cannot do that myself well. I hope ...
2
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1answer
180 views

Online text of the Officium Parvum

What version do you have of the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Officium Parvum Beatae Mariae Virginis)? I have the one posted on Play Books but it has some errors. Can you show me where the ...
4
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1answer
125 views

Help with a medieval Latin sentence

I am trying to translate a sentence in medieval Latin (see below). It comes from a document that concernes an estate that is given to a monastery. Below you can see the relevant excerpt, I bolded the ...
1
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1answer
49 views

What do "inexquisitum" and "supramemorati" mean?

In a medieval document I am reading the words "inexquisitum" and "supramemorati" appear. I do not know these words, can not find them on Google and they are not in my dictionary. Does anyone know what ...
3
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1answer
98 views

How to translate this medieval sentence

I am trying to translate the following sentence: Si liberalitatis nostrae munere de beneficiis a deo nobis conlatis locis ecclesiasticis quiddam conferimus, id nobis procul dubio as aeternae ...
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2answers
599 views

What did "quid pro quo" originally mean?

The phrase quid pro quo means "what for what" in Latin, but that makes very little sense to me. Wikipedia hints at the original meaning having to do with substitutions. That makes sense, as pro can ...
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2answers
2k views

What is a "robot" in Latin?

I read in Wikipedia the word robotum and robotor. Also, there is automaton, and androides. I don't see such a word in the [short online version of the] Lexicon Recentis Latinatis by the Vatican (which ...
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1answer
73 views

Which word best translates spark as in a spark of energy?

Any latin, my tags aren't a mistake. The more variations the better thanks
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1answer
118 views

Latin expression for "carrying something on one's back"

In Spanish, the word cuesta is nowadays used as slope. Nonetheless, the etymology of the word indicates that it comes fom Latin costa, ae meaning "a side" but also "a rib". In fact, an old meaning for ...
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2answers
147 views

The meaning of 'belgicare' in Notker Balbulus

What is the meaning of the obscure verb belgicare or belgico? Background Notker Balbulus of St. Gall (c. 840 to 912) writes this verb in a letter/epistle to a certain Lantbert, wherein Notker defines ...
3
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1answer
453 views

Variation in the spelling of word-final M

I recently visited the museum of the main monastery of the Carthusian order near Grenoble. I saw this in an open book on display in a former chamber of a monk: What took me by surprise is the ...
6
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1answer
213 views

What does a red v with a dot above mean in the Misal rico de Cisneros (Spain, 1518)?

What do the red v. mean? Manuscript: http://bdh-rd.bne.es/viewer.vm?id=12826&page=246 page 675 As stated in my other question, I've been making the manuscript into a font.
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75 views

Zeugma on a genitive noun: extraordinary or prosaic?

This Reddit comment points out that there is a zeugma on a genitive noun in this sentence from the conductus "Sol oritur occasus nescius"* in the Hortus Deliciarum: Et filiæ fit pater filius I'd ...
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1answer
900 views

What do three diagonal dots above a letter mean in the "Misal rico de Cisneros" (Spain, 1518)?

I can't seem to find this in any books about medieval scribal abbreviations. Manuscript: http://bdh-rd.bne.es/viewer.vm?id=12826&page=246 page 223/1613 They can be found all throughout the ...
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1answer
309 views

Why does the Misal rico de Cisneros uses the word "Qiſſa", and what is it supposed to mean? Why not "Miſſa" (Missa)?

The Misal rico de Cisneros, produced by archbishop Cisneros, the archbishop of Toledo, Spain, in the early sixteenth century, is a Latin Catholic missal also known as the Missale secundum ...
3
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1answer
89 views

Does this adverb phrase apply to one or both verbs separated by 'vel'?

The quote below is from the Instituta Patrum de modo psallendi, an anonymous Carolingian or more likely High Medieval document on singing psalms in Gregorian chant. (I've seen one commenter on this ...
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1answer
127 views

Gender and number in medieval composite active perfect

I am not sure of correct terminology, but let me call the medieval perfect tenses like amatum habeo — as opposed to the classical amavi — the "composite active perfect". One would expect ...
4
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1answer
209 views

Meaning and etymology of 'vinnola' or 'vinola' or 'vinnus' (music term)?

I stumbled onto the word 'vinola' or 'vinnola' and the allegedly related 'vinnus' in treatises on medieval chant. I don't see these words in Wiktionary or any online dictionaries. Does anybody know ...
2
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1answer
87 views

What is the Tinctura Physica?

This question quotes an alchemical text by Sendivogius, which mentions the Tinctura Physica as equivalent to the Lapis Philosophorum, i.e. the Philosopher's Stone. But what exactly was the Tinctura ...
14
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2answers
545 views

Is there a semantic difference between the two perfect tenses in medieval Latin?

In medieval Latin active perfect forms started to use the auxiliary verb habere with perfect participle. Thus amavi would be replaced with amatum habeo. These two constructions must have coexisted for ...
4
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1answer
297 views

What is the "apparatus fontium"?

I have encountered with apparatus fontium for example in this reference: Gundissalinus, De divisione philosophiae, apparatus fontium ad pp. 36 –7 What is it and what is it's the literal meaning?
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4answers
314 views

Meaning of "individuandum"

What is the meaning and structure of individuandum? I guess that it is an accusative gerund of unknown verb to me. For example in this context: (Siger de Brabant, Quaestiones in metaphysicam, 1981, p....
10
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1answer
275 views

The medieval abbreviation eccƚie

The abbreviation eccƚie is common in medieval latin texts, like this: which is from page 78 of Placita de quo Warranto. It can also be seen in this text and this text. There is a horizontal bar ...
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2answers
524 views

How can the use of "-aeus" as an adjective suffix in "Herculaeus" be explained?

Apparently, the English word "Herculean" has an old spelling variant "Herculæan". This seems to correspond to a Latin variant of the adjective "herculeus/Hercŭlĕus" spelled "Herculæus" (example: "...
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3answers
3k views

When to use j and when to use i?

I know that in Medieval Latin i and j were interchangeable in sound. Was the choice of the letter arbitrary, or were there rules dictating which letter to use depending on the situation?
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2answers
856 views

What sort of grammatical construct is ‘Quod per sortem sternit fortem’?

In the poem ‘O Fortuna’ (anon., 13th c., but made famous by Carl Orff’s setting), there is this verse: Quod per sortem sternit fortem mecum omnes plangite! This is typically translated as ‘...
3
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1answer
384 views

Which Latin verb was closer to the current meaning of English "solve"?

Nowadays the English verb solve means: Find an answer to, explanation for, or means of effectively dealing with (a problem or mystery). The etymology of the word indicates that it comes: from ...
6
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1answer
107 views

Help with paleography in a 16th century grant

I'm transcribing/translating a 16th century document relating to my ancestors, but struggling with a few words. One in particular is proving difficult - the contracted last word on the 1st line of the ...
8
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3answers
445 views

Was "dominus" or similar used with a title?

If a person is addressed formally with a title, it seems to vary from language to language (and to some extent within a single language) whether a word like "Mr" or "Herr" (German) is used. In Finnish ...
6
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1answer
3k views

Translations of "ad nutum"

According to this post "ad nutum" can be used to mean "instantly." However, in this translation of a text of Thomas Aquinas, the translator uses the word "blindly" to translate "ad nutum." Aquinas's ...
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2answers
14k views

Motto of Sir Francis Drake

The motto of Sir Francis Drake is: Sic parvis magna It is usually translated as "Greatness from small beginnings", but what is the literal translation? Would be be something like "Thus from ...
6
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1answer
106 views

Contradictory interpretations of a charter by King Robert the Bruce circa 1314 in medieval Latin

The Charter can be found in Registrum Magni Sigilli Regum Scotorum Vol 1, Appendix i, #71. It reads: "Carta Malcolmi Comitis de Levenax. Robertus etc. Cum concessimus Malcolmo comiti de Levenax ...
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5answers
6k views

What is a Latin version of Inshallah?

Anyone who served in the military in Iraq (and probably anyone who has done business in the Gulf) in the last 15 years is familiar with the term 'Inshallah.' I suppose it means 'God willing,' as in, "...