Questions tagged [medieval-latin]

Questions regarding the Latin of the Medieval period, approximately 500–1400

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4
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1answer
159 views

Did "sanctifico" ever mean "to make the sign of the cross"?

The Spanish word "santiguar" means "to make the sign of the cross". So for instance, when a Catholic enters a church, s/he "se santigua" (s/he makes the sign of the cross on her/himself). According ...
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69 views

Who was the last writer of Latin who was a native speaker

I have a feeling it is Isidore of Seville. Does anyone know if he specifically commented on the language spoken by the common people around him. I'm of course aware that there is no hard boundary ...
8
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4answers
3k views

Was there a word which meant roughly the same thing as "nerd" or "geek" does today?

...That is, a word meaning someone with deep and specialized knowledge, and could be used either as a badge of pride: I'm a huge Linux nerd. I helped reoptimize some of the photonal decalcifiers ...
4
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1answer
129 views

What is the declension class of Late Latin "companiei"?

What is the grammatical case / declension class of Late Latin "companiei"? From the book “Loi Salique ou recueil contenant les anciennes rédactions de cette loi et le texte connu sous le nom ...
2
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0answers
58 views

Latin Perfect Tense and romance languages particularly Portuguese

How did the perfect tense evolve in each romance language? For example is the Preterito Perfeito functionally equivalent to the Latin Perfect Tense? Heri dormivi. Ontem dormi. Ayer dormi. Hier j'ai ...
5
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1answer
93 views

Quo negato & contrario illius admisso

How would I translate the major premise of this syllogism: Dogma, quo negato, & contrario illius admisso, omnium adhortationum ad perseverandum in fide, comminationum si non perseveremus, ...
6
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1answer
134 views

Which gender for words "Magnificum Consilium"

I would like to name a product in Latin because I find it original and attractive language. I was looking for a translation for the words "great advice" so I found "Magnificus Consilium&...
8
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1answer
122 views

Who asked whom about the cape of parchment? And who answered?

I quote this cautionary tale about the dangers of studying Scholastic logic in full because it's just too good not to, but my question is only about the part in bold face: Parisius accidit, quod ...
8
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2answers
1k views

Proper parsing of "respondeo dicendum quod"

Anyone who has read the Scholastics, such as St. Thomas Aquinas, is familiar with the basic structure of an articulus: (Here's an example.) Objections ("videtur quod...") Quote from ...
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0answers
29 views

How did people describe flags and banners using Latin?

This is my first time on the forum, so If there's any tips to get my question answered feel free to share. I have been working on a Minecraft resource pack that changes the Latin setting, hopefully ...
2
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1answer
183 views

Translation of Matthew Paris’s mediaeval Latin

Secundo firmamentum caeli in medio libravit aquarum, ipsis aquis ac terra cum caelo superiore ac virtutibus, quae in ea conditorem laudarent, ante horum sex dierum exordium creatis. This sentence is ...
5
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1answer
224 views

Latin Proverb Translation

How would I translate this Latin proverb: "Qui se instar ovis gerit hunc lupi vorant." Here's what I have: "Those who devour themselves like a sheep carries this man of a wolf."
6
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2answers
420 views

Occasus nescius

In the first line of this 12th-century conductus: Sol oritur occasus nescius what does nescius refer to? Maybe diagramming the sentence is all I need, because I don't follow the grammar. If the ...
7
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1answer
182 views

Reading a snippet of 15th century handwriting in Latin

The Lilly library has a Gutenberg bible on display and the page that it is open to varies. This week the page had a marginal comment in it, which is unusual for this particular copy, and I was hoping ...
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56 views

Implicitum esse & obsessum teneri

How would I translate the bolded sections of these lines? . . . sine pudore & reverentia intrepido animo peccare, seu facere ea quae mala sunt; propriissime tamen significat peccandi habitui ...
3
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2answers
139 views

Cantus de beata virgine quae de ea in sabbatis agitur officium in conventu

This is a rubric for the hymn Ave maris stella from a French 13th century source. Someone helped me and gave me: 'A song for the Blessed Virgin when her office is celebrated on Saturdays in the ...
6
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1answer
96 views

What role does "municipatum" play in this sentence?

The abbot Berno of Reichenau, in the opening sentence of his Prologus in Tonarium, some time between 1021 and 1036, called himself the following: licet parvus meritis, servus tamen Dei Genitricis ...
3
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1answer
73 views

Objectum quod vs objectum quo

Could use some help on this translation, especially the bolded sections. Objectum huius amoris est duplex: quod, & quo. Objectum quod est creatura sive homo, qui creatura Dei est. Objectum quo ...
3
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1answer
52 views

What is "cum supportatione"?

In Epistolae obscurorum virorum, letter 3: 'Mus miser est antro qui solum clauditur uno.’ Sic etiam possum dicere de me cum supportatione, venerabilis vir, quia essem pauper si haberem tantum unum ...
11
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1answer
949 views

Did the ancients or medievals have a word for the energy stored in plants?

If you spend a little time gardening, you soon become aware that plants store energy in their roots, which they collect from the Sun through their leaves. By the end of Autumn, perennials usually have ...
4
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2answers
523 views

Quem quaeritis?

Different versions of the Visitatio sepulchri, have different line endings. Some use Christicole whereas elsewhere I have seen Christicolae. What is the difference between Christicole/Christicoles/...
4
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1answer
79 views

Eo. . .quo se ipsa magis

How would I translate this sentence? "Eo vero minus ex hoc loco quicquam efficitur, quod Ecclesia cum rogat "Converte me Domine," rogat ut Deus quo se ipsa magis ad Deum convertat ...
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128 views

On the alleged ambiguity of the Ablative Absolute "Mutatis mutandis"

According to the wikipedia entry of Mutatis mutandis, "Mutatis mutandis is a Medieval Latin phrase meaning 'with things changed that should be changed' or 'having changed what needs to be changed'...
7
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1answer
446 views

In what sense is a university (universitas) a whole?

The word for a university in many languages (not Finnish though!) comes from the Latin word universitas. The word appears to mean roughly "the whole", but one might also analyze it along the ...
5
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2answers
204 views

Participal plunder: How should ‘animum concentū’ and ‘ex aequō dēmulcēns’ be interpreted?

I am assisting someone working on Bonifaccio’s work on dance, and the following quote from Lucian (The Dance) came up, here with my translation attempt (only on the Latin part) and notes to the same: ...
4
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2answers
102 views

Translating a reflexive pronoun in a sentence with accusative

Translating a sentence from Vieta's In artem analyticen isagoge (available here) I'm having trouble: Et hic se praebet Geometram Analysta, opus verum efficiundo post alius, similis vero, resolutionem ...
4
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1answer
139 views

Paraphrase of Matthew 11:12 Translation

Could really use some help translating this in general, and the bolded parts in particular (not the meaning of the words so much as their function and placement in the sentence). It is supposed to be ...
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0answers
44 views

Elisum nomen ab "a fortiori"

What, if anything, is the elided noun in the phrase a fortiori? A curious variant and a curious translation I had been assuming that the full phrase is a fortiori ratione, "with stronger reason&...
2
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1answer
38 views

In leviter. How to translate?

How do I translate "in leviter" in this sentence? Sensus esse videtur: ne id tantum agite ut alienorum morum censores sitis, ut facta aliorum rigide ad legem divinam exigatis & notetis, ...
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4answers
9k views

"Et in terra pax hominibus bona voluntas" [sic!]

I have a German Christmas song of the 16th century, which is bilingual, German–Latin. The lyrics go as follows (I translated the German parts into English): O how beautiful the group of ...
3
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48 views

Praeter et Supra, Si non Vires

How does my translation of this passage look, especially with respect to the bolded section(s)? Modestia in cultu ornatuque corporis, praeter & supra, si non vires, saltem dignitatem moribus ...
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2answers
968 views

Representing medieval latin abbreviation symbols in Unicode

I'm trying to understand a paragraph from the 1806 transcription of latin legal texts from 1331, while being proficient at neither law nor latin. An example: which is from page 78 of Placita de quo ...
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2answers
584 views

A medieval scribal abbreviation missing from Unicode?

Placita de quo Warranto is the 1806 printed transcription of latin legal texts from around 1300 written on vellum. There are many abbreviations. The 1806 document in its preface gives an example ...
5
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1answer
231 views

Transcription of 3 latin lines in Dutch medieval manuscript

Hi Latin Stackexchange for my masters thesis I am transcribing a 16th century Dutch manuscript about alchemy. On folio 172r there are some Latin words and a Latin sentence. Can someone help me ...
5
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2answers
520 views

"videtur quod" = "it seems that" or "it is seen that"?

I thought "videtur quod" meant "it seems that", but I've seen it also translated as "it is seen that". "To seem" ≠ "to be seen" (the latter being a ...
11
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1answer
331 views

Why is *salāta feminine? What was the original noun it is modifying?

OED traces the "salad" family of words (Portuguese salada, Fra. salate, Spa. ensalada, Ita. insalata etc.) to spoken Latin *salāta, from the verb salāre. One notices that salāta as well as ...
6
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1answer
329 views

What did bishop Rémi say to Clovis?

When Clovis, the first king of Franks, stepped into the church where we was to be baptized, he was allegedly told by Rémi, bishop of Reims Depona colla, Sicamber. We were taught at school (in ...
8
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1answer
319 views

"Causa est" in this sentence

How would I translate this sentence to make sense of the "causa est?" I feel that part of it might have to do with the best choice of word for "dicit" as well. Divinitas enim in ...
5
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2answers
449 views

The etymology of "astrigmentum"

As I understand from several sources (e.g) it's meaning is kind of lace/straps. Apparently its a of a medieval origin (encountered that word in Luis Vives 16h century). But I struggle to see how this ...
11
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2answers
745 views

What kind of scribal abbreviation for Christi is this?

These are the opening words of the "Subtrahente se famula Christi Liudmila" excerpt from Legenda Christiani (Vita et passio sancti Wenceslai et sanctae Ludmilae avae eius). However, what is ...
5
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1answer
154 views

Where does this plural come from?

I am translating a medieval Latin text about the donation of a monastery. In the text there is this sentence: Idcirco noverit omnium fidelium sanctae dei ecclesiae nostrumque praesentium scilicet ...
6
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2answers
148 views

Confusing syntax in two sentences

I seem to be confused by the constructions of these two sentences from a Medieval Latin text: Unde vocum alia suavis est illa, scilicet quae subtilis, spissa, clara et acuta est. and Multiplicem ...
3
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1answer
89 views

What are the meaning of these sentences? Christiani victores obsessi

I am trying to translate the chapter titles of four chapters in a medieval source, Caffaro's De Liberatione Civitatum Orientis. Here is the full table of contents: Here are the four chapters I wish ...
7
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3answers
586 views

Longest Text in Latin

What are the longest texts, say top 5, transmitted via manuscript from the Classical/Early Medieval period?
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5answers
304 views

How does one "imitate into everything"?

"Good King Wenceslas" is a classic Christmas song, but its melody was taken from an older song: "Tempus Adest Floridum", from the Finnish carol book Piae Cantiones ("Pious Songs"). The first few ...
15
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2answers
1k views

Why did Medieval Latin use "ad" with the accusative instead of just using the dative?

Part of Documents of Medieval Latin (page 14) states several differences between Classical Latin and Medieval Latin. One is an increased use of prepositions where Classical Latin used a simple ...
7
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2answers
318 views

How might I write a latin phrase for swapping bodies?

Putting together a small literary piece where an item is inscribed with a Latin phrase that hints that it can be used to swap bodies (or minds, depending, I suppose, on your perspective) with another ...
6
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0answers
73 views

What was the use and frequency of use of Latin "mactāre"?

In What are the key differences between the main Latin verbs meaning "to kill"? we saw a lot of verbs meaning "to kill" and the differences between them. The fun part of it is that ...
5
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1answer
102 views

Why is the Chapel in the Tower of London St Peter AD Vincula, not St Peter in Vinculis?

Why is the Chapel in the Tower of London "St Peter ad Vincula" and not "St Peter in Vinculis"
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290 views

If we say worship is only for God which latin word should we use for worship?

Latria is defined as that worship which is due only to God, unlike other forms of veneration (such as to the Virgin Mary or Saints) which is called Dulia and Hyperdulia. All three, I think, are forms ...